Changes to Phoenix Forward Dashboard

Mentioned Thursday in the weekly COVID-19 Digest, UW-Green Bay has been making continual modifications to the Phoenix Forward website and the COVID-19 dashboard. The biggest change is the reporting of tests. Antigen tests are used for asymptomatic residential students (and others who request) as a surveillance measure every two weeks. PCR tests are for symptomatic students who tested at The Wellness Center. In the previous dashboard, antigen tests and PCR tests were lumped together. However, because the campus requires that students with a positive antigen test receive a follow-up PCR test to confirm their diagnosis, the previous dashboard was double counting some students. If you noticed any recent changes in numbers, this was the reason why. Thank you to all members of the four-campus community for working to keep each other safe.

Concern with non-compliance of COVID-19 policies? There’s a form for that.

The UW-Green Bay community takes seriously the protection of its faculty and staff, and the University is following the advice of local health officials and the CDC during the pandemic. The Dean of Students Office reminds the campus community that there is a form to report those on campus who are non-compliant of COVID-19 policies. Find the form, here.

 

Photo of the Covid-19 virus magnified.

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 5—I’m young! Why should I care?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. In this video Prof. Merkel discusses how we can get back to the life we remember.

Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care?

Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology, talking about why COVID-19 matters to you.

A big part of what we want to talk about is in terms of empowering you to be a part of this collective effort, to reduce the problem that is COVID-19.

We all want the economy to get back to where we want it to be. We all want to return to the lives that we used to know. So, even though you as a younger individual may have a lower risk in terms of disease and dying from COVID-19, you play a vital role in preventing the virus from being spread to someone else that have may have may have more dire consequences should they become infected.

And so, the more individuals that become infected that can’t handle the disease the greater the impact that’s going to have on the economy, The greater the burden that’s going to have on hospitals, and the harder it’s going to be for us to return to a life that we remembered before COVID-19 became a problem that it is.

So, related to all that we have to start thinking about how the virus is transmitted. This is generally thought as thought of as a respiratory disease. And what that means here is that the virus can contaminate surfaces so, we have to be mindful of washing our hands. The virus can be released when we exhale, when we sing, when we cough, when we sneeze. And the reason why those realities are important because that is the reason why we talk about face coverings. Those are the reasons why we talk about hand hygiene and keeping our hands clean. And the more we do that the greater and harder time we’re going to give the virus to continuing to infect other individuals.

And as more and more of us that do that while we wait for a vaccine, the quicker we’re going to get to be able to return to a life that we remember.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Video: Dr. Ashok Rai, CEO and president of health partner Prevea Health shares the proper way to wear masks

In this video, Dr. Ashok Rai, President and CEO of Prevea Health—UW-Green Bay’s health partner—discusses the proper way to wear a mask, and why. Don’t forget that first important step… make sure your hands are clean!

Video by Prevea Health

Video text:

Hi everyone, my name is Dr. Ashok Rai and I’m the President and CEO here at Prevea Health, and I’m going to talk to you briefly about how to put a mask on.

Now, the most important first step that a lot of people forget is to make sure your hands are clean before you even start touching your mask. So a little hand sanitizer here. Going to go ahead and get us started with that.

Next thing is you want to know what kind of mask you’re wearing and I’m going to demonstrate today the ones that go around your ears, the ones with ear loops. So you want to make sure you know what the front side is and what the mouth side is. You never want to touch the inside of the mask which would be the mouth and the nose side.

Grab it by the ear loops and then go ahead and start to place it over your nose and your mouth and firmly make sure it’s sitting on your ear loops nice and comfortable. Now if you need to adjust it you adjust it from the front once again never touching the inside.

If you have a little bendable piece of metal in the front you want to form that around your nose and you want to make sure you got a good seal around your nose and right here underneath the chin to make sure respiratory droplets aren’t going to escape. Not that hard to wear not that hard to put on.

Now let’s talk about taking it off. Once again repeating those steps somewhat backwards, taking it off the ear loops making sure I’m not touching the inside.

If I need to store it I’m going to fold it, making sure the inside’s touching the inside, and keep it very carefully, maybe putting it back inside a plastic bag so no other dirt or viruses can get to it.

I hope that helps, and I hope you remember to wear your mask. Take care.

Photo of the Covid-19 virus at a microscopic level.

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

 

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask?

Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology, talking about Why COVID-19 matters to you.

COVID-19 is a respiratory agent and what that means and why that’s important is that it can contaminate surfaces, so we have to be mindful about keeping our hands clean and washing our hands for 20 seconds.

It also means that when we breathe and exhale and when we yell or when we talk and when we cough and we sneeze because this is a respiratory disease, those are all opportunities for the virus to get out in the environment and infect someone else. Given those realities, that’s why hand washing becomes very important and it’s considered to be 20 seconds to be effective. And face coverings very very clearly when both the infected and uninfected when both parties as much face covering and face and mask wearing as we can have the better off we’re going to be. Because it reduces the ability for the virus to be transmitted and to infect other people.

COVID-19 Why it Matters Video Series:

  • Video Series Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q
  • Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs
  • Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s
  • Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4
  • Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Video: See what COVID testing will look like on the Green Bay Campus

Hi, I’m Jeremy Cleven, and today we’re going to walk through the testing process for those of you being tested on the Green Bay campus.

We’re outside the Kress Event Center right now, near the turf gym. This will be your entrance that you take to come in for the test.

Turf gym entrance

Once you make your testing appointment on the MyPrevea app, you will arrive to the Kress Center at your appointment time. You’ll enter at the first door of the turf gym, come on in wait in the socially distanced staging area, on the assigned spot.

From there you will be asked to proceed to one of the check-in stations. There you will show your ID, verify who you are, and provide us with your student ID number.

Once you appropriately check in you’ll be headed to the collection area. We have three collection areas. Just go to which one you’re called. The collection will involve you just verifying who you are and having a cotton tip swab inside your nostril. It doesn’t go very deep so it shouldn’t bother you too much.

Once your collection is taken you’ll be free to go. We will handle the testing on the back end and you should know your results through the MyPrevea app within a day.

Once we collect your sample you will follow the pathway to exit the building. It’s important to follow the path so we don’t have people running into each other and we can maintain socially distanced interactions. You will be required to leave the building through the door behind me, heading out towards the soccer stadium. You will not be able to re-enter the Kress Center unless you head around to the fitness center area.

This testing process is an important part of keeping you safe and keeping a healthy campus. Thank you for following instructions. Thank you for making the appointments.

Thank you for masking. Thank you for socially distancing.

This is meant to help you have a fun and safe experience while you’re on campus.

Information regarding My Prevea.com

Visit My Prevea.com or use the MyPrevea app. If you do not have an account, you will need to create one. Once an account is set-up, click on COVID-19 Test on the right side of your screen. Follow the process detailed below in Steps 1-7 to schedule a COVID-19 antigen test. Please allow yourself 20-30 minutes for testing. The test will be administered in the Kress Center Turf Gym.

If you have questions about antigen testing, please reach out to the Office of COVID-19 Response at covidresponse@uwgb.edu or by calling 920-465-5060.

Photo of the coronavirus that is green and round with spikes.

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 3 – Why is this virus so serious?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

 

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 3: Why is this virus serious?

Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology, talking about why COVID-19 matters to you.

COVID-19 is a very serious disease. It carries a high fatal case fatality rate much higher than seasonal influenza. It is highly transmissible, which means it spreads around very quickly and efficiently. And for people like me who study public health there are really two things that become important when we think about what makes something very serious and a threat. And the two things that are particularly are important, number one is what the case fatality rate and for this one it’s high and how transmissible or how contagious it is.

This particular disease is serious in terms of those two things. The other thing to become serious too is that as a consideration is that we don’t have drugs to treat the infection and we don’t have a vaccine to prevent the population from becoming infected. And so, what that means is for those individuals that are particularly at high risk, there’s a high risk for those individuals suffering severe disease and or death. And so, as we continue with these video clips we’re going to talk about what you can do to try to help and what our collective responsibility is.

Other videos from the series you may have missed:

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Clarification on personal travel, self-assessment

A question (or related) often asked in UW-Green Bay’s Coffee Break on Monday, August 24, 2020 is answered here regarding travel and the self-assessment form:

The CDC and Wisconsin Department of Health Services has recently changed recommendations pertaining to personal travel. The daily self-assessment form (if you are going to be on campus) has been updated to address this new standard. Specifically;

In the past 14 days have you traveled where you were required to remain in close contact with unknown individuals for periods of time beyond 30 minutes; for example, airline or other mass transit; use of hotels in which CDC Travel Guidelines were not required to be complied with?

Intrastate and interstate travel to private points specific (e.g. to see family members) which is done using private transportation and where lodging occurs at a private residence shall not restrict presence on campus, subject to confirmation that the individual did not have contact with any individual who they know to be COVID-19 infected.

In most cases, if an individual has complied with the linked CDC recommendations, they will not be subject to isolation from campus upon their return.

This item continues to be examined by the CDC and WDHS and may be subject to immediate change based on prevalence of COVID-19 spread in geographic areas.

The Learning Center (TLC) services can be accessed virtually

The Learning Center (TLC) is an essential academic resource for all students as they persist in earning a UWGB degree. Due to COVID-19 TLC services for fall can be accessed in two easy ways:

No. 1 — Student tutors will use learning platforms like Blackboard Collaborate Ultra, Microsoft TEAMS or Messenger apps to connect with students. FREE Tutoring appointments are scheduled using EAB-Navigate Download the Student Navigate app today! Contact TLC Virtual Front Desk to request assistance in scheduling appointments.

No. 2 — Students can access online tutoring offered through Brainfuse by registering for a FREE account. Use UW-Green Bay email and contact info to begin using six hours of Brainfuse tutoring per month.

Visit  The Learning Center websites or Contact Sherri Arendt The Learning Center director to learn more about these two types of free tutoring options provided.

 “Whether earning an A, or trying to boost your GPA, seek support from The Learning Center today!”

For more information about TLC services, find them on the web or follow on Facebook or Twitter.

Tips for students starting the semester on campus

Face Coverings Required Indoors

Face coverings are required once inside UW-Green Bay campus buildings, which includes the concourse system. The University will be providing each student with two cloth facemasks.

Mask Pick-up Locations

On the Green Bay Campus, masks can be picked up at the University Ticketing and Information Center (UTIC) in the University Union and the Community Center at Residence Life. At the Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan Campuses, masks can be picked up at or near Student Services. Additional locations may be added. Students unable to wear a face covering, should contact Disability Services before classes begin regarding accommodations.

Other tips for students:

  • Plan ahead. Whether it is ordering lunch, a workout at the Kress Center, or talking to a Career Services advisor, you will need to do a little planning to make it all come together. Scheduling appointments and ordering ahead will be a big part of navigating life this fall.
  • You will see frequent cleaning of high-touch areas such as doors, stairwells and restrooms. Please give staff the time and space they need to get the job done, and thank them for their efforts.
  • Expect to see markers on many floors indicating proper social distancing in reception areas, student hang outs or anyplace a line may form.
  • Hand sanitizer will be placed by most entrances to buildings as well as some throughout campus.
  • Water bottle filling stations are available (they’re touchless), drinking fountains will be closed, so bring a water bottle.