Water view of the bluffs of Baraboo Hills

UW-Green Bay science faculty go the extra distance to provide high-impact practices during Covid-19

UW-Green Bay professors and instructors, including John Luczaj (Geoscience, Water Science) is accommodating field trips this season for Natural and Applied Sciences, transforming existing and new trips into virtual interactive experiences because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In Spring and Summer 2020, virtual field trips were offered in at least four classes two new excursions are planned for this fall. Students can virtually visit De Pere Lock and Dam, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, Baraboo Hills and the Metro Boat Launch, to name a few.

John Luczaj
John Luczaj

Modern technology allowed for COVID-19 friendly virtual adaptations of the Geoscience program’s signature field trips. The goal, according to Luczaj, is for students to experience what they might have gotten in an outdoor laboratory or field trip pre-pandemic, and to give them the exposure and confidence to visit the sites on their own one day.

Assistant Prof. Shawn Malone (NAS) and lecturer Bill Jacobson (NAS) are assisting in the creation of the virtual field trips.

Luczaj explains, “Geology of the Lake Superior Region field course (spring ’20), for instance, is normally a four-day field trip in the spring. Students had seven lectures/trips on different topics throughout the region. While not all trips had video associated with them, I was able to incorporate online tools, mapping, and other information into the photo/video part of the trip for an enhanced experience.”

During the summer, Professor Luczaj was able to take his catalog of photos from past field trip stops to incorporate in the online version. For the new Water Science program, he traveled to all field trip stops around Green Bay and was able to record the footage with his cell phone. He recorded his computer screen for relevant website tools like the Great Lakes Dashboard, aerial photographs, and maps to provide videos of things students would not actually see on a bus trip.

Water Science Field Trip Fall 2020

Watch the UW-Green Bay Water Science Field Trip Fall 2020.

“The Water Science trip demonstrates various water related natural and engineered structures in Brown County,” he explains. The trip starts at the De Pere Lock and Dam along the Fox River. A full cycle of operation of the lock is demonstrated so students can see how the boats can pass through. The next few stops describe the East and Fox River systems and associated flooding.  The last stops are at the Metro Boat Launch to show the geography, shipping, and erosion from high water, followed with a discussion on sewage treatment. We make a quick stop at Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary to look at their deep irrigation well.”

The new Geoscience Field Trip to the Baraboo Hills trip will cover an overview of the major mountain building events that assembled Wisconsin, how the original sandstone was deposited in Baraboo before it was turned into quartzite, site specific structural geology where students can view structural fabrics on the rocks during folding and tectonic compression and Paleozoic history. Prof. Luczaj mentored Malone, a new addition to the Geoscience program, to highlight the links between familiar tectonic processes from around the world and Wisconsin’s geologic history while introducing him to the program’s field experiences.

Luczaj says that field experiences are critical for students in the department. Keeping COVID-19 in mind, he didn’t want students who were graduating soon to miss out on opportunities they had before the pandemic.

Story by UW-Green Bay Marketing and University Communication intern Charlotte Berg.

Photos submitted by John Luczaj

 

Video: A lesson on fall bugs from UWGB professor Mike Draney

This time of year you are probably seeing more bugs take shelter in your home. But if you are curious as to which ones may be harmful or even what they’re called, Professor of Natural Sciences at UW-Green Bay and Chair of the department, Mike Draney stopped by Local 5 Live with a lesson.

Source: A lesson on fall bugs from UWGB professor Mike Draney – wearegreenbay.com

Prof. Michael Draney discusses mosquito population | WLUK

University of Wisconsin Green Bay Natural and Applied Sciences professor Michael Draney says there are about 50 different mosquito species in the state.

“There’s a reasonable number of mosquitoes, especially this mosquito called the Northern House mosquito,” Draney said. “[It] is kind of a small mosquito that flies and bites in the daytime, and it seems to be pretty abundant in this neighborhood.”

Draney says this year seems to be worse than average, because we’ve had a wet spring.

“They sometimes are attracted to your car, if your engine is running, because it’s warm and it’s giving off carbon dioxide,” Draney said.

Source: Mosquito population in Wisconsin increases after a wet spring | WLUK

Earth Week and Virtual Earth Day 50 at UW-Green Bay

A cross-University committee has compiled online Earth Week Events and educational resources as well as an online/virtual event on April 22, 2020, Earth Day 50 at UW-Green Bay. The day includes presentations and discussions from the University community, including live videos and panels to celebrate the 50th Earth Day, together, virtually for the Eco U community.

See all virtual opportunities.

Earth Day Events

Here is the current line up for Earth Day 50 at UW-Green Bay, Wednesday, April 22, 2020:

10:30 a.m. – Historical Perspectives on Earth Day, Panel Discussion with Faculty Emeriti

UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus H.J. “Bud” Harris (Biology and Environmental Science) 2020 Wisconsin Academy Fellow, Prof. Emeritus Robert Wenger (Mathematics and Environmental Science) and long-time collaborator with the School of the Environment at Beijing Normal University, Prof. Emeritus  Michael Kraft, (Political Science and Public and Environmental Affairs)  and U.S. environmental policy expert, Prof. Emeritus John Stoll (Economics and Public and Environmental Affairs) was as UW-Green Bay student at the time of the first Earth day and the co-founder of  Environmental Business & Management Institute (EMBI) and Prof. Kevin Fermanich (Environmental Science and Water Science) and soil and water resources extension specialist, serving as moderator.
Join the discussion via Blackboard Collaborate


Noon – A Virtual Nature Walk

Join Prof. Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges live on Facebook


1 p.m. – ‘Earth Talks’

  • Michael Draney, “My life with Earth Day”
    I was 2 ½ years old during the first Earth Day in 1970 so Earth Day and I have gone through life together. I want to reflect on how it’s doing as we enter our fifth decade together.
  • Vicki Medland, “Is nature slipping away?
    Earth Day was in part a response to an environment that the organizers no longer recognized. Today, we are shocked by what seems to be a sudden and massive loss of biodiversity and natural landscapes. Why do we not notice these massive changes to our environment?  
  • David Voelker, “Earth Day 2020 in Perspective”
    How can we understand the 50th Earth Day and the environmental movement that it helped launch in historical perspective, and in light of the Covid-19 pandemic?
  • Bill Davis, “A New Water Agenda for Wisconsin.”
    What would a system look like that could achieve our human health and ecology goal regarding water?
  • Kevin Fermanich, Moderator

‘Earth Talks’ Speaker Biographies:

  • Michael Draney is professor of Biology and chair of the Department of Natural & Applied Sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay.
  • Vicki Medland is the Associate Director of the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and teaches courses related to environmental science and sustainability.
  • David Voelker is a Professor of Humanities & History at UW–Green Bay. He teaches courses in environmental history and humanities, and he is the program coordinator for the 2020 Common CAHSS conference, which will focus on the theme “Beyond Sustainability.”
  • Bill Davis is currently the senior legal analyst for the River Alliance of Wisconsin. He has worked in the environmental movement since 1987. He has an undergraduate degree in Wildlife Ecology and a law degree both from the University of Wisconsin. He has served as the executive director of three environmental advocacy organizations: Wisconsin’s Environmental Decade (now Clean Wisconsin), Citizens for a Better Environment, and the State Environmental leadership program.

Join the discussion on Blackboard Collaborate.


2 p.m. Sustainability in Action – What are you doing?

Guest speakers include Kevin Fermanich, Vicki Medland, John Arendt and Ericka Bloch
Join “Sustainability in Action” via Blackboard Collaborator

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus Assistant Prof. Renee Richer seeks election to 108th Michigan House seat | Daily Press

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) is seeking election to represent Michigan’s 108th State House District. Read more about Prof. Richer’s desire for election and her qualifications via Richer seeks election to 108th Michigan House seat | Daily Press.

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus Assistant Prof. hosts public talk on Jan. 22 | The Daily News

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus’s Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) hosted a public lecture on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 on the relationship between water quality and neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimers and Parkinson’s disease. More via Bay hosts public lecture on Wednesday | The Daily News.

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Assistant Prof. selected to attend residency | The Daily Press

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) has been selected to attend fully funded residency held at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Md. The seminar will focus on how faculty can develop a more equity-based mindset and educational experience for students. Read more via Renee Richer selelcted to attend residency | The Daily Press. 

Stocking stuffer? Associate Prof. Steve Meyer provides salsa exchange for scholarship contributions

Looking for that perfect stocking stuffer (albeit you will need a really sturdy stocking)? Are you hosting a holiday party and have not decided on the appetizers/snacks (hint: red is the perfect color this holiday season)? Thinking about what to serve your guests when you host your “Fill-in-the-blank” Bowl Game party?  How about some of Associate Prof. of Natural and Applied Science Steve Meyer’s salsa?

Meyer always has a supply of mild, medium, hot and “hot +” salsa in his office. For a contribution to the Katie Hemauer Memorial Scholarship, you can take home a pint or two (or an entire case) of salsa. Mix and match various levels of salsa hotness and see who can tolerate the “hot +” salsa at your New Year’s Eve party! It is all for a great cause—UW-Green Bay students—while remembering and honoring one of our outstanding alums!

 

Assistant Prof. Renee Richer selected to participate in Deep Teaching Residency

Renee Richer
Renee Richer

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) was recently selected to participate in the Deep Teaching Residency in January 2020. The Deep Teaching Residency analyzes how an instructor’s ability to provide an inclusive teaching experience in a STEM classroom can be impacted by various components. The Residency will be from Jan. 5 to Jan. 8, 2020 at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Maryland.