Supercharging the future by growing | Eagle Herald

“UW-Green Bay is meeting the demand for engineers due to the manufacturing growth in the Green Bay area and the NEW North region,” said UW-Green Bay’s Dean of Science, Engineering and Technology, John Katers. “As the economy continues to shift toward one of innovation and technology—even in historically important manufacturing sectors like the paper industry—electrical engineers are in high demand. Because we have such a strong employer base in the area who can offer internships and other hands-on experiences, we can grow that kind of talent right here. It’s very exciting to be able to meet this demand.”

Source: Supercharging the future by growing | Eagle Herald

Prof. Forsythe publishes paper on juvenile northern pike ecology in Green Bay

Prof. Forsythe (NAS) published a paper on juvenile northern pike ecology in Green Bay. A co-author on the paper includes former undergraduate Amy Cottrell (Biology), now a Ph.D. student at Clemson University. Abstract: Production and outmigration of young‐of‐year (YOY) northern pike from natal sites in Lower Green Bay, WI, USA, were documented over three consecutive years (2013–2015). We tested the hypothesis that spawning success and outmigration characteristics of YOY northern pike would vary among natural and anthropogenically modified habitats. Sixteen focal study locations were surveyed, including a restored natural wetland, agricultural drainage ditches, a flooded forested wetland and several unimpounded tributaries. We collected 1469 YOY northern pike with most individuals (N = 1163) originating from a flooded forested wetland on the east shore. Most sites produced YOY in all years (range N = 2–1145 individuals among study years). Outmigration ranged between 1 and 40 days during 2013–2015. Greater production and extended outmigration times occurred at most sites in 2014 (range 17–40 days) when the region experienced a late spring with heavy precipitation. In contrast, the lowest production and shortest outmigration period occurred at most sites in 2015 (range 14–23 days) when environmental conditions reflected regional averages. Outmigration began nearly 3 weeks earlier in 2015 (5/8) than in other study years (8 June 2013 and 25 May 2014). Total length (TL) of outmigrating northern pike ranged between 17 and 138 mm. Total length of YOY was significantly different among sites in 2013 and 2014, with the smallest fish (17 mm TL) outmigrating from agricultural ditches in both years. There were no significant variations in size among sites in 2015 (range 21–95 mm TL). Our results indicate significant variation in YOY northern pike outmigration characteristics within Lower Green Bay that may reflect the interplay between adult spawning site selection and annual weather patterns. Our findings highlight the importance of quantifying overlooked habitats in regions of mixed development.

Ag Briefs: UWGB designated ‘Bee Campus USA’

GREEN BAY, WI—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has been designated a campus affiliate of the Bee City USA program, a recognition given to schools and cities that make efforts to support bee populations, Wisconsin Public Radio reported.Awarded by the international nonprofit Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, the designation underscores UW-Green Bay’s work to conserve native pollinators and healthy ecosystems, said Amy Wolf, a professor of natural and applied sciences at UW-Green Bay and an expert on the state’s native pollinators. In Wisconsin, UW-Green Bay joins Northland College in Ashland, Lawrence University in Appleton and the UW-Stevens Point as Bee City USA campus affiliates.

Source: Ag Briefs: UWGB designated ‘Bee Campus USA’

UW-Green Bay launching electrical engineering program | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

GREEN BAY–The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will expand its engineering offerings by adding a degree in electrical engineering. They started in 2015 with engineering technology degrees, mechanical, electrical and environmental, and expanded to mechanical engineering in fall 2018.

“UW-Green Bay is meeting the demand for engineers due to the manufacturing growth in the Green Bay area and the NEW North region,” said John Katers, UW-Green Bay’s dean of Science, Engineering and Technology. “As the economy continues to shift toward one of innovation and technology–even in historically important manufacturing sectors like the paper industry–electrical engineers are in high demand. Because we have such a strong employer base in the area who can offer internships and other hands-on experiences, we can grow that kind of talent right here. It’s very exciting to be able to meet this demand.”

Source: UW-Green Bay launching electrical engineering program | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

What’s the buzz about? The cicadas are coming

The cicadas (suh·kei·duhz) are coming! That’s the talk around the country. Cicada Brood X is expected to emerge across several states in the U.S. this year after 17 years living underground. Brood X is one of the largest and most broadly distributed groups of periodical cicadas. What does it mean for Northeast Wisconsin? Resident insect and spider expert Mike Draney says Northeast Wisconsin will likely not see much of a change from years past, while Brood X will emerge across a large portion of the eastern United States this summer, spanning 15 states from Georgia all the way to eastern Illinois and Indiana. Draney will appear on Fox 11 on Thursday, May 13 to talk about the emergence. In the south and east, this will be a bonanza for predators, including copperhead snakes, as well as birds, squirrels, bats, wasps, spiders and other insects.

NERR virtual kick-off events can be accessed at NERR website

UW-Green Bay and its partners, hosted two virtual kick-off events in April to educate the public about NERR and what it could mean to the region and state. The kick-off was highlighted by a video describing the importance of protecting our freshwater resource — not only for our physical livelihood, but for commerce, recreation, and pure enjoyment. Watch the video. The one-hour kick-off events can now be accessed at the UW-Green Bay NERR website.

UW-Green Bay and area partners are leading the charge to establish a National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) for the Green Bay watershed—home to the largest freshwater estuary in the world. The NERR system is a national network of 29 sites across the coastal U.S., designed to practice and promote stewardship of coasts and estuaries. Established through the Coastal Zone Management Act, the reserves represent a partnership program between the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the coastal states. NOAA provides funding and national guidance, and each site is managed on a daily basis by a lead state agency or university with input from local partners.

The regional NERR designation would promote a coordinating force to manage, restore and protect the Green Bay ecosystem, with a programmatic focus on four sectors—research, education, stewardship, and training.

UW-Green Bay and its partners, hosted two virtual kick-off events in April to educate the public about NERR and what it could mean to the region and state. The kick-off was highlighted by a video describing the importance of protecting our freshwater resource — not only for our physical livelihood, but for commerce, recreation, and pure enjoyment. Watch the video.

The one-hour kick-off events can be accessed at the UW-Green Bay NERR website.

Next steps will be to review relevant geography being considered for a site, draft criteria to be used in the site selection process, and identify 3-5 optimal candidate locations for the Green Bay NERR.

 

Patrick Forsythe and students tagging a northern pike.

Students and faculty in the Aquatic Ecology and Fisheries program featured on Discover Wisconsin

Beginning on Saturday, May 15, 2021 and going through the following week these news outlets will be airing a Discover Wisconsin segment about UW-Green Bay’s Aquatic Ecology and Fisheries Lab. On Monday, March 15, 2021, a Discover Wisconsin crew visited campus and followed UW-Green Bay students and staff in the field. Discover Wisconsin is highlighting the impacts of the University of Wisconsin System on people and regions throughout Wisconsin. The segment featuring UWGB is on the University’s Aquatic Ecology and Fisheries Lab ideally situated on the world’s largest freshwater estuary. Crews interviewed Interim UW System President Tommy Thompson,  student researchers and faculty members Christopher Houghton and Patrick Forsythe, before gathering footage of student researchers and faculty in the field, as they worked on their Northern Pike research. Watch for the segment:

Milwaukee WITI Fox Sunday 7:30-8:00am
Lacrosse/Eau Claire WXOW/WQOW ABC Saturday 6:30-7:00am
Wednesday 5:00-5:30pm
Thursdays 6:00-7:00am
Madison WKOW ABC Saturday 6:30-7:00am
Duluth KBJR NBC Saturday 6:30-7:00am
Green Bay WFRV CBS Sunday 7:00-7:30am
Wausau/Eagle River WAOW/WYOW ABC Saturday 6:30-7:00am

 

UW-Green Bay Launching Electrical Engineering Program in Fall 2021 | Seehafer News

The University of Wisconsin Green Bay is preparing to begin their brand new Electrical Engineering Program next school year.What started in 2015 with Engineering Technology degrees (mechanical, electrical and environmental) expanded to Mechanical Engineering in fall 2018, and now, the university is accepting freshman to their Electrical Engineering program. UW-Green Bay engineering students are able to test their skills in the 63,00 square foot, $15-million, state-of-the-art Brown County STEM Innovation Center at UW-Green Bay which houses the Resch School of Engineering, The Einstein Project, Brown County Extension and Brown County Land & Water Conservation.For more information visit https://www.uwgb.edu/goal/supercharge/.

Source: UW-Green Bay Launching Electrical Engineering Program in Fall 2021 | Seehafer News

Two students set by an electronic board as they figure out calculations in one of the engineering labs inside the new STEM Center for UW-Green Bay's Mechanical Engineering Program.

Video: UW-Green Bay’s Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Craig Brecheisen knew most of his life that he wanted to become a mechanical engineering because of his love of race cars and always trying to figure out how things work. If you love to design or dig into machinery—take things apart, put things back together, and figure out how and why they work—you have it in you to become a mechanical engineer. UW-Green Bay’s Mechanical Engineering Program is the only one of its kind in Northeast Wisconsin and provides you with state-of-the-art technology and hands-on experiences in the brand-new Brown County STEM Innovation Center’s engineering labs on the Green Bay Campus. See the website for more.

Video Transcript: When you realize that you are smart enough and the whole time you were smart enough and you just needed to learn how to work. That’s where the benefit came from. I remember that aha moment that I had when I was at the tech school. Realizing that you had it in you the whole time, you just needed to do the work.

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, gave me a chance to earn my Mechanical Engineering degree without having to leave Green Bay. Wow, moment I had, it’s the first time that I ever stepped foot into the new STEM building. Technology is state-of-the-art, top-notch, and brand new. Thermodynamics would be one of my favorite classes. The other class that I really enjoyed was Finite Element Analysis. In this class, you get to create different projects i.e., front-end geometry for race cars. And then put different forces on it to see how it acts. To see if it will hold up, what your design in your head, put in a computer with real-life forces on it, will it last. You actually get something physical to see.

I feel like my instructors are more of mentors than they are the traditional professor to students. The ratio of a student to professor is really low, which allows you to build a rapport with them. They’re always willing to help you and if you’re willing to put in your time, they will help you achieve what you’re looking to achieve.

This campus will always be a huge part of me because this is the beginning of the second half of my life. Like another chapter, where I started from scratch, grew up, learned things, and then went out into the world to apply them. This university gave me a chance to achieve one of my greatest lifetime goals and that’s being a Mechanical Engineer.