Faculty invited to Inclusivity and Equity Conference

Faculty members are invited to attend the Inclusivity and Equity Conference, from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, March 4 in the Christie Theatre. This faculty conference offers insights and suggestions on enhancing classroom inclusivity. This faculty career development is provided via collaboration with the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the Dean of the College of Professional Studies; Inclusive Excellence; Pride Center; American Intercultural Center and Human Development. Faculty will have the opportunity to listen to and ask questions from: 1) a guest panel of diverse students who will discuss their experiences and insights on what an inclusive classroom means to them; 2) Deborah Furlong, Ph. D., senior policy/programming analyst, who is presenting current student enrollment data; and 3) a faculty panel consisting of members Kristin Vespia (Human Development/Psych), Adrianne Fletcher (Social Work) and Stacie Christian (Human Development/Psych); Adult Degree Program who will discuss online practices/online equity scorecard; self-reflection; and tips concerning students who are transgender and the use of pronouns. This is an excellent opportunity to hear students and faculty talk about their classroom experiences.

Register Online

Regents approve more dynamic administrative model for UW-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin Board of Regents voted Friday (Dec. 11) to approve a UW-Green Bay request for the first major restructuring of academic administration at the University in two decades.

“I am extremely pleased the Board has supported our proposal to reorganize,” said UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller. “This will help our ability to be more responsive to state and regional needs. It creates an administrative structure that is more in line with our peers. It gives us the flexibility to prosper in what is a dynamic higher education environment.”

With the restructuring, UW-Green Bay will move away from the two-colleges model currently in place to one in which academic majors, faculty, staff and resources will be aligned in four distinct colleges (or schools).

The four divisions will be:

  • The College of Health, Education and Social Welfare
    (formerly the College of Professional Studies)
  • The Austin E. Cofrin School of Business
    (formerly housed in the College of Professional Studies)
  • The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
    (created from the existing College of Liberal Arts and Sciences)
  • The College of Science and Technology
    (created from the existing College of Liberal Arts and Sciences)

Miller says the move from two colleges to four — to be accomplished in 2016 — is cost neutral but growth positive. The structure should enable deans to be more active and effective in targeting enrollment, outside grants and fundraising along with new partnerships and community engagement specific to their programs.

At its founding in the late 1960s, UW-Green Bay employed a five-college model but budget cuts and consolidation reduced that number during the 1970s. With the exception of 1990-1996 (when there were three), the University has had two colleges through most of its history.

Miller calls that model outmoded, given the rising expectation for universities and their administrators to expand programming and generate revenue. Noting the four-college model approved Friday is common for institutions of UW-Green Bay’s size and scope, Miller says 10 of 13 UW System universities have four or more deans, only Superior has fewer than UW-Green Bay’s two, and only one has three.

The new academic structure has been endorsed by governance groups including UW-Green Bay’s Faculty Senate and its executive council, the University Committee.

“The reorganization proposal was a community effort,” Miller says. “I am deeply grateful to the faculty, staff and student leadership for their great wisdom and courage in a time of great change.”

The Chancellor also credited the University’s Council of Trustees for endorsing the plan and its vision of an outward-oriented and entrepreneurial University, where deans are empowered to be more accountable for programs in their areas.

“We are most fortunate to have an extremely active and informed Council,” Miller says. “That group of business leaders helped us develop the proposal and advocate for it to the Board of Regents. I want to thank Council of Trustees Chairman Lou LaCalsey and Advocacy Committee Chair Craig Dickman for their work.”

At present, the two deans reporting to the University’s primary academic administrator, Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor Greg Davis, are Scott Furlong, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; and Sue Mattison, dean of the College of Professional Studies. Major programs in Mattison’s area are Business, Education, Social Work and Nursing, while most other academic programs at UW-Green Bay report through Furlong.

It is expected that searches aimed at identifying candidates for the newly created deanships will begin in spring 2016.

15-128

Business grad will receive Outstanding Student Award at UW-Green Bay

Emily Blaha of Sturgeon Bay has been chosen the December 2015 recipient of the Outstanding Student Award presented by the UW-Green Bay Alumni Association.

Emily Blaha
Emily Blaha

The Business Administration senior with an emphasis in marketing and a minor in design arts will receive her diploma at UW-Green Bay’s mid-year commencement ceremony scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 19, at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

The Alumni Association, which has been designating a single Outstanding Student Award recipient for each graduating class since 1976, recognized Blaha from among approximately 450 graduating seniors eligible to receive diplomas at December commencement.

A 2012 graduate of Southern Door High School, Blaha will complete her degree requirements on an accelerated, three-and-a-half-year timetable.

Additionally, Blaha will be part of the platform party at commencement as student speaker for the ceremony. She was chosen to deliver remarks on behalf of her class by a committee of UW-Green Bay faculty members and administrators. She was nominated by Management Prof. Lucy Arendt, who describes her as “an exceptional asset to the Austin E. Cofrin School of Business, UW-Green Bay and the greater Green Bay community.”

Through work and paid employment, Blaha has served as a marketing and communication assistant for the University Union, and as marketing coordinator and social media specialist for UWGB’s College of Professional Studies. Her independent study topic was “Managing Culture in a Small Business,” and her senior year placement was a product-strategies internship with Schreiber Foods, Inc., headquartered in Green Bay.

She was one of a dozen standout students appointed an inaugural member of the Cofrin School of Business Student Advisory Board, providing input on curriculum and programming.

Blaha is the recipient of academic merit scholarships and dean’s list honors, and is a member of the Phi Kappa Phi academic honor society. She has been active in a range of programs across campus, including service as advertising manager for The Fourth Estate, the weekly student newspaper. When she increased advertising sales by 20 percent, she was selected to serve as the organization’s business manager.

15-125

UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary presents ‘Last Lecture Series’

UW-Green Bay has announced its lineup for a “Last Lecture Series” during the 2015-16 academic year in celebration of the University’s 50th anniversary. Presenters were asked to convey what lecture they would give, if it were to be their last. The monthly lectures will take place Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the University Union’s Christie Theatre. The lectures are free and open to the public. The lineup:

Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies, “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance, “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing, “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary presents ‘Last Lecture Series’

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has announced its lineup for a “Last Lecture Series” during the 2015-16 academic year in celebration of the University’s 50th anniversary.

Each month, a UW-Green Bay faculty member will give a public presentation on a topic of his or her choice. Presenters were asked to convey what lecture they would give, if it was to be their last. The monthly lectures will take place Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

UW-Green Bay Humanistic Studies Prof. Derek Jeffreys, who specializes in the study of philosophy, ethics and religion, will deliver the first lecture, “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison,” on Sept. 23. A professor at UW-Green Bay for 15 years, Jeffreys is the author of books offering information and insight on religion, ethics and torture.

Jeffreys said he became interested in torture in American prisons, particularly the effects of shelter and confinement. To gain further understanding, he visited and spent time in prisons and now volunteers teaching philosophy and religion with the Green Bay Correctional Institution and the Brown County Jail.

“I am passionate about the subject of my Last Lecture because I find teaching prison inmates deeply rewarding,” Jeffreys says. “Inmates have few educational opportunities, and are hungry for knowledge. They are eager to engage in philosophical and religious discussions. I am enriched by these conversations, and in my lecture I will share with the University community what I’ve experienced in the Green Bay Correctional Institution. By teaching in this prison, I’ve gained insights into the nature of the person. Prison inmates live in a difficult and often brutal environment, yet they can make remarkable personal changes. Their example can lead us to reflect on the mystery of the person.”

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:
Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies, “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance, “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing, “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies, “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences, “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

More information on 50th Anniversary activities can be found at 50.uwgb.edu.

15-87

New early childhood partnership with NWTC announced

Exciting news for the UW-Green Bay Professional Program in Education. Early Childhood Education programs at UWGB and NWTC will soon be bridged to allow Early Childhood Education Associate Degree Program graduates from NWTC to transfer seamlessly into the licensure and non-licensure education programs at UWGB. Additionally, faculty from both institutions will work hand-in-hand, designing a course to help transition these NWTC graduates to a four-year institution. This project is funded by Wisconsin Department of Children and Families, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Wisconsin Early Childhood Association, and TEACH Early Childhood Wisconsin.

UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary will feature faculty lecture series

The lineup is set for the UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary “Last Lecture Series” for the 2015-16 academic year. Each presentation is a Wednesday event beginning at 7 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre.

The lineup of distinguished faculty lecturers:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit”

List of student exhibitors at Academic Excellence Symposium 2015

The 14th annual Academic Excellence Symposium, showcasing the talent and research ability of some of UW-Green Bay best students, took place April 7. The list of Academic Excellence Symposium projects, students, faculty advisers:

Reaching Out Through Girl Scouts 

Brittany Pyatt
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

Western Policy and Influences on Middle Eastern Terrorism: Al-Qaeda
Alexander Girard
Eric Morgan, Democracy and Justice Studies

Funding the Southern Door County School District: A Policy Analysis 

Jared Spude
David Helpap, Public and Environmental Affairs

Assessing the Effects of Media Exposure
Shelby Vanhouten, Meghan Baker, Kayla Blochowiak, Sarah Wick
Regan AR Gurung, Human Development

Freedom House: Early Childhood 
Coordinator 

Morgan Bolli
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

A Policy Analysis: Phosphorus Loading 
the Bay of Green Bay
Gina Vlach
David Helpap, Public and Environmental Affairs

Maternal Education and SES Effects on Creativity During Joint Engagement Reading
Cassandra Bartlett
Sawa Senzaki, Human Development

London Post-War Housing and the 
Festival of Britain
Joseph Taylor, Benjamin Dudzik, Hannah Giesick
Caroline Boswell and Heidi Sherman, Humanistic Studies

In-home Therapy with Children on the Autism Spectrum 

Kelly Berth
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

The Lost Connection: Benefits of Being a Bilingual Professional in the U.S. Healthcare System
Julia Rose Shariff
Cristina Oritz, Humanistic Studies

Efforts Directed Toward the Synthesis of Obolactone
Lauren Anderson, Noel Craig, Kristin Short
Julie Wondergem, Natural and Applied Sciences

Improving Engagement within the Psychology and Human Development Majors
Kortney Krajewski, Kathryn Doll, Michelle McChesney, Chad Osteen, Amanda Schartner
Jenell Holstead, Human Development

Attitudes and Perceptions of Mental Illness
Olyvia Kuchta
Ryan Martin, Human Development

Positive Body Image Program Analysis
Mackenzie Wink, Haily Hummelmeier
Kristin Vespia, Human Development

15 Locus of Control and the Stress Response
Sarah Londo
Ryan Martin, Human Development, Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Effects of Coping Style and Age on Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention Behaviors
Hollis Reynolds
Dean VonDras, Human Development

A Meta-analysis of Mindfulness Training as a Therapeutic Intervention for Externalizing Disorders
Destany Calma-Birling, Emily DiNatale
Dean VonDras, Human Development

On Broadway District Neighborhood Master Plan
Rebecca Ellenbecker, Sadie DiNatale
Marcelo Cruz, Urban and Regional Studies Ashley Heath, Center for Public Affairs

Children’s Edible Garden Intern with the Brown County Central Library
Sarah Tomasiewicz
Sara Schmitz, Human Biology

Meme Impressions
Chad Osteen
Kathleen Burns, Human Development

Science of Sexy? An Empirical Test of 
Dressing Recommendations
Sarah Wick, Meghan Baker, Kayla Blochowiak, Shelby VanHouten
Regan AR Gurung, Human Development

Emotions in Sports Performance 

Kayla Hucke
Ryan Martin, Human Development

Impact of Phonology and Number on Children’s Novel Plural Productions 

Katharine Bright, Kayla Hucke
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

Exploring the Significance of Faults and Fractures in the Confined Aquifer in Northeastern Wisconsin (Brown and Outagamie Counties): Insights From Stable Isotope Patterns 

Amanda Hamby
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences

Comparison of Analytical Methods for 
the Determination of Chlorophyll a 

Ryan Badeau
Michael Zorn, Natural and Applied Sciences

Extracurricular Group Impact 

Kathryn Doll
Jenell Holstead, Human Development

The Physiologic Effects of Video and Audio Stimuli on the Human Body

Ryan Hass, Travis Ladwig, Mary Pappas, Kaitlyn Pilarzyk, Crystal Remsza, Aimee Schaefer, Bridget Schedler
Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Impact of Music Tempo on Perceived Exertion During Exercise
Katrina Schumann, Alisha Maciejewski, Hailey Mohrfeld
James Marker and Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Decisions and Personality: Self-Regulation and the Big Five
Kari Kovacs
Kathleen Burns, Human Development

Perceptions of Abuse
Monica Wysocki
Kathleen Burns, Human Development
Emergence of Cross Cultural Difference in Moral Development in Infants
Keegan Eggert
Sawa Senzaki, Human Development

Revealing Green Bay: Industry and Development in Print
Gena Selby
Chris Style, Art and Design

Vocalissimo: Creative Activities in Florence, Italy with a Musical Performance
Ashley Gutting, Evan Ash, Tori Schuurmans
Sarah Meredith-Livingston, Courtney Sherman. Music

Drawdown of the Potentiometric Surface in the Cambrian-Ordovician Aquifer in Marinette County, Wisconsin
Christa Kananen
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences

Senior Show Portrait Paintings
Laura Schley
Kristy Deetz, Art and Design

Demo of Gallagher-Lepak, Herdman and Ashmann apps


The College of Professional Studies is inviting interested members of the campus community to a gathering this Thursday (Feb. 19), from 3 to 4 p.m. in MAC Hall 137. “Help us celebrate the launch of two innovative computer apps by faculty members — Dr. Susan Gallagher-Lepak and Dr. Heather Herdman (Nursing), who will demonstrate their new nursing diagnostic tool, and Dr. Scott Ashmann (Education) who will demonstrate a teacher evaluation tool. Refreshments will be served.”

Studies and snow angels: Nursing hosts visiting scholar from Brazil

Prof. Maria Márcia Bachion of the Federal University of Goiás (Brazil), recently completed three weeks as a UW-Green Bay visiting scholar in the Professional Program of Nursing. Bachion is currently completing her postdoctoral work under the direction of Dr. Alba Lucia Bottura Leite de Barros, at the Escola Paulista de Enfermagem of the Federal University of São Paulo (Brazil). She came to UW-Green Bay to work on data analysis and preparation of articles with Assistant Prof. Heather Herdman. Bachion’s postdoctoral work focuses on the evidence-based development of screening and assessment tools to enable accuracy in nursing diagnosis, outcomes and interventions for a variety of patient populations. Bachion spent a day with Associate Prof. Janet Reilly visiting the Wound Clinic at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee, to compare treatment protocols between a major teaching hospital in the U.S. and her own university hospital in Goiás. She also “enjoyed” our Wisconsin climate enough to take a shot at creating some snow angels. (See photos.)