Applications to Education Program are due Oct. 2

Please spread the word. Applications are due Friday, Oct. 2, 2020 for students applying to be a Spring 2021 candidate in the Professional Program in Education. To apply, please submit the Application for Candidate Status Form. If you have questions regarding the Education Program or our application requirements, please contact us at 920-465-2137 or education@uwgb.edu for more information or to schedule an advising appointment.

Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier named UW-Green Bay assessment coordinator

Please join the Office of Academic Affairs in congratulating Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier as the 2020-2022 Assessment Coordinator (AC). Pilmaier has been with UW-Green Bay, Sheboygan Campus since 2009 and an Associate Prof. of English and Women’s and Gender Studies since 2015. In her role as AC she will oversee assessment efforts carried out by the University, and collaborate with various offices across the institution, including the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, Student Success and Engagement, Institutional Strategy and Effectiveness, General Education Council, and University Assessment Committee.

Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier
Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier

Murrenus Pilmaier was the institutional assessment Coordinator for the UW Colleges from 2012-2016. In this role she oversaw the entire assessment program for the UW Colleges (which included departmental and campus assessment), worked closely with the Office of Academic Affairs,  the Senate Assessment Committee and the Senior Information Manager, as well as other student-focused offices in the institution, and introduced and helped to implemented a variety of initiatives that ensured that we maintained national best practices for educational excellence.

As the public face of assessment at the UW Colleges, she frequently presented the work to institutional, national and regional conferences and was interviewed by the HLC whenever they visited the institution. Murrenus Pilmaier views assessment as a recruitment tool and hopes it will ensure that our students receive an equitable experience via standardized learning outcomes (discipline-specific) that focus on student learning rather than arbitrary/antiquated measures of knowledge. She has worked with TRIO and Pre-College Initiatives, better incorporate the LEAP initiatives more deliberately in department learning outcomes, as well as various work within UW Colleges Assessment. She received her Ph. D. in The British Novel and Twentieth-Century British Literature from Marquette University.

 

 

UW-Green Bay outlines study spaces on four campuses

Juggling back-to-back online and in-person classes can be difficult, especially with physical distancing on campus. Students looking for study spaces at UW-Green Bay campuses are welcome to sit on available furniture in common areas, as directed by signage. Additionally, each campus has study spaces in the libraries and computer labs. See additional information about available study spaces unique to each campus and please be sure to physically distance:

Marinette Campus
Students may study in the cafeteria (one person per table ), in the lobby of the main building, in the study room in the library, or in the computer labs. There are three reservable individual study rooms in the library building.

Manitowoc Campus
The library, commons, computer lab F139 (when not occupied by classes), Student Involvement Center and the Game Room are available for students.

Green Bay Campus
Within the library, students may study in the Library Commons or the 3rd, 5th or 6th floors. The Cofrin Library also has private rentable rooms for the semester a fee (no computers, wi-fi access), free reservable rooms equipped with a computer (Reserve at third floor circulation desk.), and non-reservable, first-come, first-served rooms with no technology but wired/wireless internet access available. The GAC (General Access Computer) Lab has reservable rooms with computers. (Reserve through the Lab Consultant.)

Other specific study spaces include: the Commuter Lounge and the Office of Student Life suite in the University Union, the Garden Café, concourse areas in Lab Sciences, Studio Arts, Rose Hall and Wood Hall. Many of the tables outside are within wi-fi-reach as well.

Sheboygan Campus
Students may access library computers or study in library study rooms, the Cyber Café (Room 4207) and a number of open classrooms (designated with signage).

Research Council announces Fall 2020 Grant in Aid of Research call, Sept. 28 deadline

The Research Council is pleased to announce that the Fall 2020 round of Grants in Aid of Research is now accepting applications. Faculty are encouraged to apply for funding in support of conference presentations and their ongoing research. Full details can be found on the Research Council website, underfunding opportunities including the application, cover page, and budget template. The deadline for applications is 11:59 pm on September 28th, 2020. All applications must be submitted electronically using the Qualtrics survey link in the application forms.

Photo of the Covid-19 virus magnified.

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 5—I’m young! Why should I care?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. In this video Prof. Merkel discusses how we can get back to the life we remember.

Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care?

Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology, talking about why COVID-19 matters to you.

A big part of what we want to talk about is in terms of empowering you to be a part of this collective effort, to reduce the problem that is COVID-19.

We all want the economy to get back to where we want it to be. We all want to return to the lives that we used to know. So, even though you as a younger individual may have a lower risk in terms of disease and dying from COVID-19, you play a vital role in preventing the virus from being spread to someone else that have may have may have more dire consequences should they become infected.

And so, the more individuals that become infected that can’t handle the disease the greater the impact that’s going to have on the economy, The greater the burden that’s going to have on hospitals, and the harder it’s going to be for us to return to a life that we remembered before COVID-19 became a problem that it is.

So, related to all that we have to start thinking about how the virus is transmitted. This is generally thought as thought of as a respiratory disease. And what that means here is that the virus can contaminate surfaces so, we have to be mindful of washing our hands. The virus can be released when we exhale, when we sing, when we cough, when we sneeze. And the reason why those realities are important because that is the reason why we talk about face coverings. Those are the reasons why we talk about hand hygiene and keeping our hands clean. And the more we do that the greater and harder time we’re going to give the virus to continuing to infect other individuals.

And as more and more of us that do that while we wait for a vaccine, the quicker we’re going to get to be able to return to a life that we remember.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Mike Alexander featured in Lakeshore Leaders Breakfast Series

UW-Green Bay Chancellor Mike Alexander will be a guest speaker in the Lakeshore Leaders Breakfast Series – Sparking Ideas & Innovation, 8 to 9 a.m. Oct. 14, 2020. The series is designed to hear from distinguished leaders from the lakeshore about the positive impact they are making in our communities. Registration is $20. The Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement is the event organizer.
Wednesday, October 14 – Michael Alexander, Chancellor, UW-Green Bay
Wednesday, November 11 – Members of the Kolher Alliance of Veterans & Supporters (KAVS)
Wednesday, December 9 – Dan Ariens, Chairman & CEO, Ariens Co

Video: Dr. Ashok Rai, CEO and president of health partner Prevea Health shares the proper way to wear masks

In this video, Dr. Ashok Rai, President and CEO of Prevea Health—UW-Green Bay’s health partner—discusses the proper way to wear a mask, and why. Don’t forget that first important step… make sure your hands are clean!

Video by Prevea Health

Video text:

Hi everyone, my name is Dr. Ashok Rai and I’m the President and CEO here at Prevea Health, and I’m going to talk to you briefly about how to put a mask on.

Now, the most important first step that a lot of people forget is to make sure your hands are clean before you even start touching your mask. So a little hand sanitizer here. Going to go ahead and get us started with that.

Next thing is you want to know what kind of mask you’re wearing and I’m going to demonstrate today the ones that go around your ears, the ones with ear loops. So you want to make sure you know what the front side is and what the mouth side is. You never want to touch the inside of the mask which would be the mouth and the nose side.

Grab it by the ear loops and then go ahead and start to place it over your nose and your mouth and firmly make sure it’s sitting on your ear loops nice and comfortable. Now if you need to adjust it you adjust it from the front once again never touching the inside.

If you have a little bendable piece of metal in the front you want to form that around your nose and you want to make sure you got a good seal around your nose and right here underneath the chin to make sure respiratory droplets aren’t going to escape. Not that hard to wear not that hard to put on.

Now let’s talk about taking it off. Once again repeating those steps somewhat backwards, taking it off the ear loops making sure I’m not touching the inside.

If I need to store it I’m going to fold it, making sure the inside’s touching the inside, and keep it very carefully, maybe putting it back inside a plastic bag so no other dirt or viruses can get to it.

I hope that helps, and I hope you remember to wear your mask. Take care.

Photo of Custodial Lead Heather Wade pushing her cleaning cart past a row of books as she cleans the Cofrin Library.

Video: Custodial staff work to keep campus safe

Custodial Lead Heather Wade cleans the Cofrin Library to help prepare for our fall 2020 opening.  Custodial staff across all four campuses have been following new cleaning guidelines provided by the CDC and other health experts. When you see custodial workers, please let them know that our Phoenix Family is thankful for all the work that they are doing to keep us safe on campus.

Photo of the Covid-19 virus at a microscopic level.

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

 

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask?

Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology, talking about Why COVID-19 matters to you.

COVID-19 is a respiratory agent and what that means and why that’s important is that it can contaminate surfaces, so we have to be mindful about keeping our hands clean and washing our hands for 20 seconds.

It also means that when we breathe and exhale and when we yell or when we talk and when we cough and we sneeze because this is a respiratory disease, those are all opportunities for the virus to get out in the environment and infect someone else. Given those realities, that’s why hand washing becomes very important and it’s considered to be 20 seconds to be effective. And face coverings very very clearly when both the infected and uninfected when both parties as much face covering and face and mask wearing as we can have the better off we’re going to be. Because it reduces the ability for the virus to be transmitted and to infect other people.

COVID-19 Why it Matters Video Series:

  • Video Series Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q
  • Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs
  • Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s
  • Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4
  • Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Photo of a student employee wearing a mask at working at the University Ticketing and Information Center (UTIC) in the University Union.

Video: Student Mask Information & Distribution

Greetings Phoenix family. Safety is our top priority this fall and that is why all individuals must wear a face covering once inside any UW-Green Bay campus building, which includes the concourse system. The University provides two free cloth facemasks for every student. On the Green Bay Campus, students can pick up their free masks at the University Ticketing and Information Center (UTIC) in the University Union. At the Marinette, Manitowoc, and Sheboygan Campuses, pick up your masks at or near Student Services. Also, on the Green Bay Campus inside the Community Center at Residence Life, students have the option for the mask laundry exchange service, where you pick up a clean mask, return it to be laundered, and immediately receive a new clean mask. Students unable to wear a face covering, should contact Disability Services at dis@uwgb.edu or 920-465-2841 before classes begin regarding accommodations. For more information related to COVID-19 and the University’s plan for returning to campus safely https://www.uwgb.edu/phoenix-forward

Video Transcript:  Greetings Phoenix family, I’m here to talk to you about staying safe. Safety is our number one priority here on-campus for the fall. Students we have two options for masks for you. In the University Union we have the University and Ticketing and Information Center, which is where if you are looking for a mask for the fall, we have you covered. You can go ahead and pick up two reusable masks that we’ll issue to you all students. You can also pick up those masks in Residence Life at the Community Center. An additional option is if you want a mask that will launder for you, you go ahead and pick that up in the Community Center and then when you’re done and like a clean one you drop it off and we’ll reissue you a new clean one. We have two types of masks that I’ll explain what they are: This is the first type that if you pick up in the Res Life Community Center will be launderable. So, you pick this mask up we’ll issue you one and then when you want it cleaned you just drop it off and we’ll reissue a second one. This mask here is one of the up to two that will go ahead and issue the students who are looking for a reusable mask that’s theirs to keep. If you’re looking for something a little more fancy or looking for some of your share your GB spirit we do have masks available for sale in the Phoenix Bookstore. They have this version and they also have a similar one that says Green Bay and across the front. Those are available for purchase if you want to pick something else up that’s different and show your school spirit. If you are unable to wear a mask for any medical reason, we do ask that you reach out to the Disability Services Office to make sure that you have an accommodation put on file and they can help you through the process to find a suitable alternative to make sure we keep you and us safe on campus.