Director of Counseling and Health, Henniges, talks about resources

Video transcript:

I am Amy Henniges, the Director of our Counseling and Health Center. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you all of you who are helping to flatten the curve of the spread of COVID 19 by following the guidelines of Staying Safer at home.

Additionally, I would like to thank all of the employees that are too essential to our campus operations to stay at home, for taking all the extra precautions to keep us safe.

Safer-at-home is our currently our best option for slowing the spread of the virus and flattening the curve so that our health care system has enough beds, critical care capacity, and healthy front line health care workers to take care of those most critically ill.

It is more critical than ever to maintain at least 6-feet social distancing and to continue to cover our cough and to wash our hands and disinfect surfaces.  

New this week, the CDC is also advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to wear in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores).  Simple masks or face coverings can slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it, from transmitting it to others. You also really want to minimize how often you are going out on essential errands.

Simple cloth face covering can be made out of made at home from common materials at low cost, like a bandana.

The COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting changes to our lifestyles, can make anyone overwhelmed, anxious or even depressed. Please don’t hesitate to ask for help. Our campus support services remain open by phone. Our counselors, nurses and nurse practitioner are available for phone consultations with students. 

Check out our Counseling and Health website for phone appointment details, additional virtual care options for COVID Screenings in the community, and wellness resources and tips.

Employees have access to counselors by phone through our EAP program.

Finding healthy ways to cope and stay connected is so important. I also encourage you to check out the resilient.wisconsin.gov for additional tools to encourage self-care, maintain social connections, and reduce stress.

Staying Safer at Home is more important than ever, and we know it is not easy. We are all in this together and we are here to help.

UW-Green Bay faculty members create a Pandemic Poetry Exchange

UW-Green Bay Professors Alise Coen (Political Science, Public & Environmental Affairs) and Jessica Van Slooten (English, Women & Gender Studies) were featured in a local news story for their creation of an interdisciplinary Pandemic Poetry Exchange group. The pair talked to reporter Diana Bolander for the Herald Times Reporter.

Alise Coen
Alise Coen

The group has grown to more than 200 members on Facebook and offers a supportive creative space to help cope with physical distancing.

The Facebook group is called ‘VanCoen Pandemic Poetry‘ (a combination of their last names) and has more than 225 members. The group’s guiding principle is to be ‘a supportive space for members to read, create and share original poems (broadly defined) to help cope with social distancing and quarantine-like conditions during the COVID-19 situation.

Jessica Van Slooten
Jessica Van Slooten

Both Coen and Van Slooten said they find that the group helps them feel more connected to the world while in isolation.

Coen noted: “I am comforted and inspired by our group as a supportive space for sharing art through words. The poems shared are sometimes humorous, sometimes somber and almost always descriptive of people’s different experiences and perspectives.”

 

 

A poem by Van Slooten:

Fold the paper vertically

and curve the scissors just

so: begin with a point,

flare into generous cures,

and finish in a deep cleft. 

Unfold your heart. 

Remember they come in all

shapes, sizes, colors. 

Make a rainbow of hearts:

love is love is love.

Put two hearts together

to form wings, and fly.

Imagine every paper heart

beating steady, strong,

a talisman to heal broken

hearts, heart failure.

Tape the hearts on windows

and doors: spread the love

 

Not Aleppo by Coen

Tending to street cats
In the middle of war
The man in Aleppo
Knows far more
About trying to find peace.
Me with my books
With my smart phone in bed
Using words to escape
The traps in my head
Safely sprawled under fleece.

Still, I fell nervous
In my privileged bombes nights
Mulling over viral posts
Of healthcare worker plights
And epicenter quakes.
Ny the lights of my screen
That comforting glow
The fear is well disguised
As a think I need to know
So I read all the takes.

 

 

 

Contribute to ‘Community Voices: Stories for the Archives’

A project for all ages, all walks of life, all experiences.

The world is collectively experiencing unprecedented times with the fast progression of the coronavirus. Time seems to be moving differently. Hours feel like days, while days can feel like weeks with the everchanging nature of the virus. Therefore, it can be important, not just for now, but for decades later, for individuals to consider documenting their experiences during this time. This sparked the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Archives and Area Research Center to create Community Voices: Stories for the Archives. This is a program in which people are invited to share their stories during this time with the Archives, and for perpetuity.

Personnel in the Archives have created a brief series of questions meant to serve as journal prompts. Some of the questions touch upon how daily life has changed, what precautions are being taken, what is helping people cope and what emotions are being felt. Individuals can answer as many or as few of the questions as they like. Individuals can also remain anonymous and respond more than once as their circumstances change. Share your story, here or e-mail archives@uwgb.edu.

Deb Anderson, coordinator of the Archives and Area Research Center, said the community voices shared so far are telling poignant stories about health concerns, job security as well as humorous accounts of everyone working and schooling from home.

Everyone, including members of the public, are welcome to fill out this survey. Educators of all levels are encouraged to use this with their classes. Parents can also fill it out with their children. Young people often may not get a chance to have a voice in historical records, so this is a great opportunity to do so! Looking ahead to when these times are taught in schools across the world, your voice can be one that is remembered.

Anderson noted that often times, personal experiences, feelings and thoughts are left out of official historical records. “Rather than wait for the historical record to come to the Archives, we want to be part of creating the historical record by saving the stories,” said Anderson. “Our innovative approach to gathering the stories of individuals during this unheard of time in our world will enrich how we can understand this moment in history.”

Regardless if individuals participate in Community Voices, the Archives personnel encourage people to keep diaries and journals, take photos, draw illustrations of your experiences, write letters to yourself, make a family movie or save your blog posts. Create items that can last into the future. Maybe later, you can consider donating a copy to the Archives. One UW-Green Bay student teacher has already planned to donate her students’ journals to Archives at the end of the school year.

To learn more about donating items to the Archives, please contact Deb Anderson at archives@uwgb.edu.

Story by Marketing and University Communication Intern Joshua Konecke

 

 

 

 

 

Photo with graphic title picturing Senior Lecturer Nydia Villanueva preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the chemistry lab at UW-Green bay, as she gets ready to teach students in Principals of Chemistry II Lab at UW-Green Bay.

Video: Teaching Chemistry remotely, Nydia Villanueva

Here’s an example of teaching remotely. Senior lecturer Nydia Villanueva (NAS) preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the Chemistry Lab on the Green Bay Campus. Her students are taking Principals of Chemistry II Lab remotely.

Here she records the experiment and posts the video online.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Photo of a laptop playing Mary Gichobi drawing on her PowerPoint lesson

Professor Gichobi is teaching aspiring teachers Mathematics in a new way

Students in the Professional Program in Education are fortunate to have Assistant Prof. Mary Gichobi teaching EDUC 281 Conceptual Foundations of Elementary Mathematics. The course teaches aspiring teachers how to teach mathematics concepts common to the curriculum of elementary and middle schools.

Mary Gichobi
Mary Gichobi
Assistant Professor
Education Program

Gichobi covers areas such as the processes of abstraction, symbolic representation and notational manipulation in arithmetic contexts as well as examines topics such as multiplying and dividing fractions, decimals and ratio and proportional reasoning using different strategies”.

“Gichobi has been innovative and unflappable in moving her on-campus courses to alternate delivery,” according to Dean Susan Gallagher-Lepak.

Say Lepak-Gallagher, “She says she does it ‘just like the way I would do it in class’ but with a few new technology tools.

In teaching EDUC 281, she goes through her PowerPoint slides and solves mathematical problems as she explains them, sort of like a narrated PowerPoint, but uses a software called Xodo to write on the PowerPoint. She screen records as she writes and then compresses it to a video using MP4.

Gichobi’s analytical strengths are equally balanced by a student-centered approach to teaching.

Animated gif of Mary Gichobi drawing on her PowerPoint lesson
Animation of Mary Gichobi writing notes on her PowerPoint lesson.

“I always feel that our students deserve support and guidance to go through the challenging terrain of life,” Gichobi said. “They may get stuck and not know who to ask. I feel passionate to help them in little and any ways.”

Students seem to appreciate Gichobi’s efforts. One student communicated this week to Gichobi the below message:

“I would like to thank you for your video of the lesson… It was refreshing to hear you teach the lesson and explain it in detail. It makes this change feel more like being in class. Thank you for all your hard work in making this transition so smooth. I can’t imagine it has been easy for you or the other professors.”

Operation Community Cares

UW-Green Bay alumni helping with basic goods through Operation Community Cares

As the effects of the Coronavirus begin to be felt in households across Brown County, Operation Community Cares is working to ensure that everyone has the necessary essential items to make it through these difficult times.

Operation Community Cares, in partnership with United Way, Brown County Board, ADRC, the Green Bay Packers, Paul’s Pantry, BCVSO and Veteran volunteers, are working together to provide a safe way for area residents who don’t have the funds and can’t leave their homes to receive essential supplies and connect them to available resources.

Currently, whether directly through Operation Community Cares or with partner organizations, there are nine UW-Green Bay alumni working in key leadership positions on this project. Those alumni are Sarah Inman ’92 (Political Science), Will Nething ’19 (Business Administration), Brandon Danforth ’19 (Business Admin), Nic Olp, Ken Corry ’16 (Integrative Leadership Studies), Holly Ladwig ’15 (Social Work), Jill Sobieck ’92 (Human Development), Jenna Hunt ’15 (Integrative Leadership Studies) and Elaina Koltz ’06 (Human Development).

The Operation Community Cares mission is “to distribute basic needs items to vulnerable populations in our community during the COVID-19 pandemic in a safe, systematic manner. Our process will identify and continue to work with existing personnel and families in need and identify new personnel and families that have become victim to the circumstances upon us.”

Operation Community Cares plans to establish either a centralized hub for individuals to receive essential items or use a distribution delivery system already in place or a new method of delivery. A volunteer staff will help make this plan a reality for the greater good of the general public while keeping personal health and safety a priority. Thanks to the UW-Green Bay alumni making a tremendous difference in the community.

 

 

Image of the UW-Green Bay campus and the bay of Green Bay with a title "We Miss You Phoenix"

Video: We Miss You Phoenix Family!

We Miss You Phoenix Family! We are separated but not alone. We are tenacious. We are resilient. UW-Green Bay students, faculty and staff, alumni, fans and friends, no matter where you are right now, YOU are a Phoenix, and WE will get through this AS ONE. Stay Home. Be Safe. Rise to the Challenge.

<em>– Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication</em> 

Falcon Cam Photo

Follow UW-Green Bay’s nesting Peregrines Mimi and Rupert via webcam

Thanks to the work of dedicated students (especially Jacob Woulf, Brandon Byrne, and Noah Nei), faculty mentors (Amy Wolf and Bob Howe), the UW-Green Bay IT staff (especially Ron Kottnitz and Monika Pynaker), Paul Pinkston and staff at Facilities Management, and support from the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and local bird enthusiasts Paul and Annie Mueller, the nest of UW-Green Bay’s Peregrine Falcons (Mimi and Rupert) is available for online viewing. The nest, located in a converted vent near the top of the Cofrin Library, can be followed at UW-Green Bay Peregrine Falcon Nest Box LiveStream video on YouTube.

See the Falcon Cam

Reports Wolf, “The first egg was laid last week, and Mimi and Rupert are now incubating four eggs! We expect the young to hatch around April 24-26. We all hope that these spectacular birds will provide some enjoyment for you and others, especially during these difficult times.”

Find more about the history of this endangered pair, see our 2017 article Campus Cliffhanger: A team of volunteers bands together for successful birth and banding of Peregrine falcons.

May, 14, 2019 photo of falcon nest.

UW-Green Bay student receives multiple awards at Fox River Ad Club 2020 Addy event

UW-Green Bay student Dane Schumacher (Design Arts and Art) received a Silver Student Addy Award, a Gold Student Addy Award and the Best of Show Addy Award in the annual contest sponsored by the Fox River Ad Club. His Student Silver and Student Best of Show Addy Awards were for his “Rubberneck Converse Collection” multiple-piece campaign designs (below), a fall 2019 Design 431, Graphic Design Studio III project.

Dane Schumacher
Dane Schumacher 

His Gold Student Addy Award was for his “Children’s Defense Fund” (above) multiple-piece campaign design, a fall 2019 Design 431, Graphic Design Studio III project. The event was February 21, 2020 at the 2020 American Advertising Federation Fox River Ad Club Addy Awards Event, hosted by St. Norbert College. Photo submitted.

 

Rubberneck Converse Collection
Rubberneck Converse Collection

UW-Green Bay Prof. Kevin Fermanich named 2020 NEW Watershed Champion

UW-Green Bay Prof. Kevin Fermanich (Water Science, Geoscience and Environmental Science) has been named the 2020 NEW Watershed Champion. He formally received this recognition on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 from NEW Water and the Green Bay Water Utility during the 2020 World Water Day event.

Prof. Fermanich is a lead co-principal investigator on a collaborative project studying the links between edge-of-field water quality, soil health and field management at sites in Great Lakes priority watersheds. Additionally, he is a soil and water resources specialist with Wisconsin Extension.

Fermanich was recognized at the seventh annual World Water Day event hosted by NEW Water, the brand of the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District, and the Green Bay Water Utility at the Jack Day Environmental Education Center. World Water Day (www.worldwaterday.org) is a commemorative event launched by the United Nations in 1993 to bring awareness to global water issues. The two water entities honor World Water Day to call attention to local water issues, including aging infrastructure and impairments, and to celebrate the efforts of a local champion in caring for the watersheds of Wisconsin.

The theme of this year’s World Water Day is “Water and Climate Change.” Globally, this means an increasing demand for water as populations increase, which can drain natural resources and cause environmental damage.

“The Green Bay Water Utility is adapting to address the water effects of climate change to continue to protect health and safety to our customers,” said Nancy Quirk, general manager of the Green Bay Water Utility.

The World Water Day held in Green Bay also serves to celebrate local efforts to strive toward solutions. Learn more about past Champions here.

Fermanich has worked at UW-Green Bay since 1998. Along with many partners, Fermanich and his students study water quality, watershed management, soil health, Green Bay restoration, and agricultural management issues. He is a lead co-principal investigator on a collaborative project studying the links between edge-of-field water quality, soil health, and field management at sites in Great Lakes priority watersheds. Additionally, Fermanich is a soil and water resources specialist with Wisconsin Extension.

“Our era faces a number of water challenges, not only globally, but here in Wisconsin as well.  Dr. Fermanich exemplifies the spirit of working together to find solutions to the many vexing water challenges we’re facing today,” said Tom Sigmund, Executive Director of NEW Water.

Learn more about Green Bay Water Utility: www.gbwater.org
Learn more about NEW Water: www.newwater.us

This post is written in cooperation with NEW Water. Photo submitted by Tricia Garrison, NEW Water. In the photo, from left to right, Tom Sigmund, executive director, NEW Water; Prof. Kevin Fermanich and Nancy Quirk, general manager, Green Bay Water Utility