Kimberley Reilly to deliver presentation on women suffrage-Door County Pulse

UW-Green Bay’s Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Justice Studies, History, Women’s and Gender Studies) will deliver a Door County Talks presentation, “Woman Suffrage 100 Years Later: Assessing Its Triumphs and Limits” on Feb. 22, 10 a.m., at the Door Community Auditorium in Fish Creek. One hundred years after women won the constitutional right to vote, Reilly will discuss the ways in which the women’s-rights movement won passage of the Nineteenth Amendment and the lessons we can learn from that victory. Free-will donations are encouraged. Source: Kimberley Reilly to Deliver Presentation on Women Suffrage – Door County Pulse

UW-Green Bay faculty lead ‘Door County Talks’

This month, there will be three presentations given by UW-Green Bay faculty and staff in Door County. The first is on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 at 10 a.m. with Vince Lowery (History), the director of Student Success and Engagement at UW-Green Bay, called “How Many Reconstructions Does it Take to Be Free? A Meditation on the Long Civil Rights Movement.” The second presentation is Saturday, Feb. 22 at 10 a.m. with Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Justice Studies) called “Woman Suffrage 100 Years Later: Assessing Its Triumphs and Limits”. On Saturday, Feb. 29 at 10 a.m., Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett  (Democracy and Justice Studies) presents “The Radical Vision of the American Abolitionists). These presentations are in partnership with The Door County Civility Project. All events are free and open to the public, but donations are encouraged.

Opera inspired by Prof. Harvey Kaye’s book

A new Four Freedoms opera by composer Joseph C. Phillips, Jr. was inspired by FDR’s January 1941 Four Freedoms speech and UW-Green Bay Prof. Harvey Kaye’s (Democracy and Justice Studies) book “The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great.” The opera will premier at the University of Maryland on Friday, Feb. 14, 2020.

Emily Zilliox

‘Potential is unlimited’ for Wisconsin Women in Government award winner, Zilliox

“Unlimited potential” is how chair of the UW-Green Bay’s Political Science program, Associate Prof. Aaron Weinschenk describes UW-Green Bay student Emily Zilliox, a fall 2019 recipient of the Wisconsin Women in Government Scholarship award.

Zilliox is a junior majoring in Political Science and Democracy and Justice Studies with an emphasis in Women’s and Gender Studies. She also has a minor in Public Administration. In fall 2019, she received a scholarship from the nonprofit organization Wisconsin Women in Government—not an easy feat. The scholarship is intended for women who plan to pursue careers in public service, public administration or governmental affairs. Those selected for the scholarship must demonstrate their leadership abilities and positive contributions to society. Zilliox said she is proud and honored to be acknowledged and awarded a scholarship.

Emily Zilliox“Going into the public sector can often feel like a thankless job, so getting recognition like this really serves to lift you up,” she said.

Zilliox is chair of the Health and Safety Committee for Student Government, vice president of Theta Eta Alpha and vice president of the Sexuality and Gender Alliance. She is also a student employee, working as a student lead at the David A. Cofrin Library. She is committed to continuous improvement, and this commitment is evident to her faculty advisors.

“If Emily tells you she is going to do something, she will do it,” states Weinschenk in his recommendation letter for her scholarship application. “Emily is exactly the type of student you want to have in your classes—she shares her ideas, works well with others, does what she says she’ll do and maintains a positive attitude.”

It’s her professors that have been influential to her success, Zilliox said. When asked what her favorite part of UW-Green Bay is, Zilliox’s response… “One hundred percent the professors. The faculty of all the areas I am involved in have helped and supported me since I was a freshman, and I really cannot even put into words all that they’ve done or how thankful I am.”

Not only is Zilliox, a LaCrosse, Wis. native, incredibly active on campus, but an internship with the Green Bay Mayor’s Office has expanded her responsibilities and her opportunities. Zilliox is also dedicated to helping the surrounding community through this internship — a position she gained with the help of Associate Prof. Katia Levintova (Global Studies and Political Science). Her main task is to work on figuring out the logistics for a new Public Safety building for the City of Green Bay.

“It has been a really fun experience, and it’s taught me a lot about how local government works,” she reflected.

Her fall 2019 semester wasn’t without some difficulty. After learning she earned the scholarship, she soon learned she would need an emergency surgery, which was a setback for her. Once again, it was her perseverance and the willingness of the faculty that helped her get back on her feet.

“I had a medical issue this semester, and all the professors have gone above and beyond to help me catch up and even checked in to make sure I was okay,” she explained, “which is something that really meant a lot to me.”

Through everything Zilliox has experienced, from both successes and challenges in her college career, she credits her father for motivating her and influencing her to continue working hard and having an impact on what she does. While political role models include Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Zilliox credits her father with being her greatest role model.

Emily Zilliox

“My mother passed away when I was four, and he really just became the ultimate parent and taught me so many life lessons, like personal responsibility, having a good work ethic and taking pride in the work you do while staying humble,” Zilliox said. “He really is the hardest working and strongest person I know, and even though we don’t agree on everything politically, I do try to make him proud in everything I do.”

When Zilliox graduates from UW-Green Bay, she hopes to continue to make her father proud by creating a lasting impact in Wisconsin.

“I would love to work as a legislative aide in a State Assembly person’s office in Madison,” she says. “My big dream is to become a U.S. Senator from Wisconsin, but we will work our way towards that.”

Based on Zilliox’s accomplishments and passion to succeed, her future is certainly bright!

Story by Marketing and University Communication student assistant Emily Gerlikovski

Faculty note: Prof. Harvey Kaye to talk politics at two New York shows

Prof. Harvey Kaye (Democracy and Justice Studies) will be busy in New York at the end of this week. On Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020 at 9 p.m. (Central Standrard Time), Prof. Kaye will be joining host John Fugelsang once again in-studio in New York City on his show “Tell Me Everything” on SiriusXM Progress (Channel 127) to talk politics past and present. Also, on Friday, Feb. 7, Prof. Kaye will go on stage in Brooklyn, N.Y. at The Bell House as part of the Michael Brooks Show Live for a night of comedy and politics. Information can be found here.

Save the Date: Historical Perspective Series continues March 31, 2020

Two lectures that are a part of the annual Historical Perspective Series are taking place on March 31, 2020, both in the Christie Theatre, Green Bay Campus. At 2 p.m., Richard Brookhiser will speak on his new book “Give Me Liberty: A History of America’s Exceptional Idea.” Brookhiser is a senior editor of “National Review,” and he is also married to the second speaker of the day, Jeanne Safer. Safer will be giving a lecture on her new book “I Love You, But I Hate Your Politics: How to Protect Your Intimate Relationships in a Poisonous Partisan World” at 7 p.m. The lectures cover both conservative and liberal view points; Brookhiser is a conservative, while his wife, Safer, is a liberal. This annual series is sponsored by UW-Green Bay’s Center for History and Social Change, which since 1986, has invited a wide variety of historians and social scientists to the UW-Green Bay campus. The talks are free and open to the public.

UW-Green Bay faculty to speak at Door County Talks

UW-Green Bay faculty are scheduled to give presentations at the 2020 Door County Talks winter series. Presenters include Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Political Science), Associate Prof. of History and Director of Student Success Vince Lowery, Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Justice Studies) and Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Political Science). Below is a description of the presentations.

Immigration Politics: Between Rights and Restrictions with Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Saturday, Jan, 18, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Debates over U.S. immigration policy have been shaped by a complex history characterized by tensions between migration restrictions and migrant rights. To understand ongoing policy shifts regarding immigration and asylum, it is important to engage with the evolution of both nativism and human rights advocacy. International law and evolving court interpretations have also played a crucial role in immigration politics, exemplified by recent discussions about the Flores Settlement Agreement and zero tolerance policies designed to deter undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers. Coen’s presentation aims to weave together these diverse and sometimes paradoxical historical forces to help shed light on current political realities.

How Many Reconstructions Does It Take to Be Free? A Meditation on the Long Civil Rights Movement with Associate Prof. and UWGB Director of Student Success Vince Lowery (Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

With the abolition of slavery, the United States entered the period of Reconstruction, which historian Eric Foner calls “the unfinished revolution.” The meaning of freedom for African-Americans, and in fact all Americans, remained in question. That “revolution” began again in the mid-twentieth century with the civil rights movement, which some historians refer to as the “Second Reconstruction.” Now fifty years removed from that event, in light of the persistence of Jim Crow-style policies and practices, many are calling for a “Third Reconstruction.” In his talk, Lowery will trace the threads connecting these three eras, exploring moments of progress and regression and the road left to travel.

Woman Suffrage 100 Years Later: Assessing Its Triumphs and Limits with Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

How did the women’s rights movement win passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, and what lesson can we learn from that victory? One hundred years after women won the constitutional right to vote, we will examine the history of the suffrage movement alongside battles that were left unfinished. We will also consider how the legacy of the suffrage movement influences the fight for gender equality today.

The Radical Vision of the American Abolitionists with Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Speaking at a Fourth of July celebration in 1860, the formerly enslaved Frederick Douglass famously asked his audience: “Why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence?” With this fierce denunciation of American hypocrisy—that the country would celebrate liberty and equality while so many remained enslaved in the South—Douglass offered a radical vision of American history and democracy. In this talk, we will look at how those opposed to slavery (like Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, David Walker and Abraham Lincoln) offered a new, expansive reading of American ideals as they challenged the “peculiar institution.” We will consider how they looked back to the founding era and its documents and forward to a new dawn of justice. In light of that progressive outlook, we wi;; also discuss the lasting legacy of the abolitionists and how slavery continues to influence American politics and ideas.

No RSVP is required for the Door County Talks series. Freewill donations will be encouraged at the door. Coffee and bakery from Kick Ash Coffee will be available for purchase for DC Talks and Coffeehouses.

Prof. Kaye discusses politics and new book

Elections are heating up and so are interviews with UW-Green Bay Prof. Harvey Kaye (Democracy and Justice Studies) talking across the nation about the political scene and his new book. Here is an opportunities to listen and watch: Harvey J. Kaye: How Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang’s policies are inspired by America’s radical tradition.