Grant will support UW-Green Bay students with financial support for childcare; begin research phase of childcare options for UW-Green Bay students, faculty and staff

Green Bay, Wis.—Recognized as a need at UW-Green Bay for decades, childcare and caregiving burdens on students, faculty, and staff are even heavier during COVID-19. A recent grant, of $81,046.00 per year for four years, awarded to UW-Green Bay by the Department of Education will provide stipend support to Pell-eligible student parents  to help ease their financial burden for childcare and access to programming, advising, and mentorship to improve their educational outcomes. The same funding will also provide seed money to initiate research and a planning process for a potential childcare facility on the Green Bay Campus or in partnership with a local provider.

Nearly 25 percent of all undergraduate college students are raising children. Recent data shows that about half of all college students earn a degree or certificate within six years of enrolling, while only a third of student parents complete school (https://iwpr.org/iwpr-issues/student-parent-success-initiative/building-family-friendly-campuses-college-success-student-parents/).

Associate Prof. Alison Staudinger (Democracy and Justice Studies), a project lead, says the grant will provide some immediate help for a growing demographic in higher education—the working parent.

“The grant application specifies criteria for the application process for students which will provide $1,000 a semester for full-time students and funding on a prorated basis for part-time students,” she said. “It will also offer additional funds for students who participate in high-impact practices (HIPs) such as internships, undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative activity, or community-based learning. A recent study by professors Katia Levintova and Kim Reilly indicated that childcare and work commitments often limit the ability of UW-Green Bay student-parents to participate in HIPs.

Additionally, the funding will allow the campus to explore the sustainability of providing a daycare to students, faculty and staff—either on campus, or in partnership with local providers.

“Students with children bring assets to our campus community and yet they are a bit of an invisible population,” Staudinger said. “If we are truly an access-driven institution, we need to provide the support that makes it possible for them to thrive at UWGB. This means financial, academic, and social resources for the student-parents themselves, but also raising visibility on campus so that faculty and staff recognize the unique needs of this population and their contributions to campus life.”

Childcare has been a hot-button topic at UW-Green Bay for years, and has a rich history on the Green Bay Campus. See the full timeline. Here’s an abbreviated one:

1972: UWGB Children’s Center opened and began offering classes for children ages 2-5 in a vacated nursing home building owned by Brown County located along Highway 54-57. Within months it moved to a remodeled ranch cottage owned by UWGB on Nicolet Drive.

1981:Three full-time staff and twenty-five work study students cared for 164 children.

1985:Plans for a new facility began as building was in disrepair

1989:The UWGB Children’s Center program became the first in Green Bay to receive accreditation from the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs.

1990:New UW-Green Bay child care center building center request approved by UW Board of Regents at funding level of $790,000.

1991:Plan was rejected by Wisconsin State Building Commission because it was viewed as a lower priority than other UW System and state agency projects. UWGB did receive $50,000 in funds to evaluate alternatives for a child care facility at UW-Green Bay. A feasibility study was requested to consider a public/private venture model for the UWGB Children’s Center.

1992-1995: Funding issues prevented continuation of facility.

Spring of 1995: Children’s Center formally closed.

2014: UWGB students voted to increase Seg Fees in support of bringing childcare back to campus.

Staudinger says the plan has full support of the current administration and cabinet. The Advisory Board will convene in Fall 2020; interested campus and community members are invited to contact Alison Staudinger if they wish to get involved. An expanded set of web-resources and the application for the grant itself will be launched in early 2021, as will student success programming for parents. Please watch for an announcement of a kick-off event in where the campus community can learn about the program and how to apply.

In the featured photo above: the UWGB Childcare Alliance supported a Spring into Gardening event.

Below: Photos from University Archives at the UWGB Children’s Center
  

Famed Writer of Comics, Sci-Fi, and ‘Stranger Things’ Inspires UW-Green Bay Student Novelists

Green Bay, Wis.—A famed writer has signed-on to teach at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Author Michael Moreci is teaching the Novel Writing course for the fall 2020 semester.

Moreci is a dedicated writer and has a variety of works spanning from comic books to novels. He has been recognized by various magazines and newspapers including The Hollywood Reporter and USA Today, along with the website Comics Alliance. Some of his work includes the Science Fiction novels Black Star Renegades and We Are Mayhem, and comics Wasted Space, The Plot, Burning Fields, and Curse. He is also author of the comic feature “Stranger Things.”

Author and writer Michael Moreci

What can students expect from Moreci?

“I’m the type of person who likes to share, not hoard, knowledge,” he says. “If you want to know something about writing—creatively or professionally—you’re going to get a real and truthful answer from me. Always.”

Novel Writing will run through December and is a fall-only course. It gives students an opportunity to gain experience with writing and workshopping a 50,000-word novel as credit option for students majoring in English or Writing and Applied Arts.

Program Director Rebecca Meacham is thrilled. “Mike offers insights from his experience as a professional writer,” she says. “He knows both the craft and the business of writing, especially in the genres that many students love best—horror, supernatural, sci fi, comics.”

This semester, Moreci’s goal is to give students confidence and help expand their knowledge of the industry. “My approach is boots-on-the-ground; it’s about what it means to be a working writer and how to become one. I want my students leaving my class knowing that they can write a book and, more importantly, what to do after.”

For a tour of Michael Moreci’s workspace, check out his link: https://youtu.be/oT6kY8Ev0h4.

Press release written and submitted by Elizabeth Asmus, creative intern, English program, UW-Green Bay

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Common CAHSS

‘The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How We Can Advocate for Environmental Justice’

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

“As I see protests in 2020 bringing many of the environmental justice crises into a bigger public discussion, I hope we can think beyond traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and really start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems,” Wheat says.

Wheat is the second in a speaker series brought to both campus and community as part of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2020-21 theme, “Beyond Sustainability.” Professor David J. Voelker (Humanities, History), co-chair and program director said this theme is especially timely…

“The Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, which have cast intense light on the challenges that we face as a society, provide especially poignant contexts to address the theme of ‘Beyond Sustainability: Imagining an Ecological Future,’” Voelker says. “We need a more robust framework than “environmental sustainability” to address the interrelated environmental and social crises that we now face. The word ‘environment’ draws a line of separation between humans and the rest of the community of life. We have been talking about sustainability for decades, but we’ve made little progress on addressing unsustainability,” Voelker said. “I hope that the conference theme helps us as a community to imagine something beyond ‘environmental sustainability’—an ecologically sound and just society.”

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science will also host a virtual week around the theme, Nov. 30, 2020 through December 4, 2020.

Prof. Wheat to lead environmental justice/civil rights presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

Spread the word, Greater Green Bay Chamber to host Virtual Job Fair in December

Please spread the word among job seekers, including UW-Green Bay students who will be graduating in December. The Greater Green Bay Chamber is taking a lead role on filling the workforce development gap by hosting a Virtual Job Fair on Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in partnership with The Business News and the Wisconsin Job Center. During this two-hour virtual event the Chamber will host up to 50 employers who are seeking to fill positions at their organizations. The Chamber will host up to 450 potential job seekers who will choose which companies they want to talk to. The job seekers will choose up to eight employers and will be virtually sent around the Zoom rooms to talk with employers. Representatives from the employers will present what openings they have, what they are looking for in a candidate and how job seekers can apply. There are many opportunities for organizations and individuals to be involved.https://www.greatergbc.org/events/line-on-work-virtual-job-fair/.

Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: UW-Green Bay theater professor’s play gains momentum in Texas

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WFRV) – The ball got rolling recently for a play by Thomas Campbell, Ph.D, of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theatre and Dance faculty. The first public staged readings for Campbell’s full-length drama, “Faithfall,” were held at Texas A&M University-Commerce. According to a news release: “Faithfall” will be given its world premiere at UWGB later this school year when UWGB students mount a recorded production. The three staged readings in Texas were streamed online with no live audience in attendance. The UWGB production also will be streamed. The staged readings in were part of the “New Play Development Series” at Texas A&M-Commerce. Staged readings are common as a way for playwrights and producing entities to get a feel for the dynamics of a new play. Often, adjustments to scripts are made from them.

Source: Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: UWGB theater professor’s play gains momentum in Texas

CAHSS and Effect upcoming events from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Please consider tuning into these CAHSS and Effect events:

Philosophers Café
October 14 @ 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Emily Ransom returns to the Café to explore what may be gained or lost in a holistic approach to education and cultural engagement. 

Curiosity by CAHSS LIVE
October 14 @ 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Alan Chu (Assistant Professor, Psychology and Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology), Rebecca Nesvet (Associate Professor, English), Jennifer Young (Associate Professor, English), Chris Williams (Associate Professor, English) are all part of this presentation.

Next up for COMMON CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability
The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How we can advocate for Environmental Justice

October 22 @ 4 to 5 p.m.
Elizabeth Wheat is an associate professor in Public and Environmental Affairs, Political Science, Environmental Science, and Policy. She will be speaking about traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems.

More from CAHSS and Effect, including live events, podcast, news and more including senior Theatre major Faith Klick performing “All Falls Down” from the musical Chaplin.

How empty stadiums play a role in an athlete’s performance and mental health

Assistant Professor Alan Chu is the Chair of the Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Masters Program at UW-Green Bay, a new program with its first cohort this fall. Chu said a fan cheering on their favorite team plays a much bigger role than we might think. “When the players see the fans, they’re able to get those attentional cues and be able to celebrate or focus on certain tasks,” said Chu.

Source: How empty stadiums play a role in an athlete’s performance and mental health