UW-Green Bay Comm Week is coming, Feb. 24 to 27

The UW-Green Bay Communication department is hosting its fourth annual Comm Week from Feb. 24 to Feb. 27, 2020. Comm Week is UW-Green Bay’s very own annual event to celebrate the past, present and future of UW-Green Bay’s Communication Department.

The week is packed full of events. See the schedule below:

Monday, February 24
8 a.m. – 11 a.m.: Morning Coffee, MAC 2nd floor booth
5 p.m. – 7 p.m.: Evening Mocktails, Alumni Room

Tuesday, February 25
11 a.m. – 3 p.m.: Comm Job Fair, 1965 Room

Wednesday, February 26
6 p.m. – 8 p.m.: Comm Carnival, Phoenix Room C

Thursday, February 27
3 p.m.: 3x3x3 Showcase, Weidner Center
3 p.m.: Comm Film Festival Showcase, Weidner Center
6 p.m..: Comm Week Banquet with Guest Speaker Laura Hollingsworth, Weidner Center Foyer

Most events are free; however, the Comm Week Banquet on Feb. 27 is $10 for students and $30 for faculty/staff, friends and family. Register for the banquet here.

I Am Psyched! National Tour will be at the Cofrin Library from Feb. 11-22, 2020

“I am Psyched!” is a multimedia initiative that explores the history and contemporary contributions of women of color in psychology as they engage in psychological science, practice and social justice. Created by the American Psychological Association‘s Women’s Programs Office, the exhibit highlights achievements of women of color in psychology. Learn about the inspiring lives of many women who accomplished “the firsts” in psychological science, to benefit society and people’s lives. In addition to the exhibit, events will be held to highlight the experiences of women of color in psychology in our area. All events will be held on the fourth floor of the Cofrin Library unless otherwise noted and are open to the public:

Tuesday, Feb. 11, 4 to 6 p.m., Opening Reception
Join us as we launch this important exhibit celebrating women of color in psychology. We will have speakers, a photo booth and information on WOC sheroes in psychology!

Wednesday, Feb. 12, 5 p.m., Speaker Sheng Lee
Sheng Lee runs Us 2 Behavioral Health Care in Appleton, which addresses current disparities in mental health services for minorities.

Monday, Feb. 17, 4 p.m., I Am Psyched Talks
Four 10-minute talks by students on four amazing women of color in psychology. Support students, be inspired.

Feb. 17 to 22, Student Union, Photo Booth…This is what a psychologist looks like!
Future (and current) psychologists…Stop by your table at the University Union and show the world your future self!

For more information, contact Associate Prof. Christine Smith (Psychology, Women’s and Gender Studies) at smithc@uwgb.edu.

Prof. Ryan Martin featured in piece about coping with Packers loss | USA Today Network

Associate Dean for the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences and Prof. Ryan Martin (Psychology) was featured in an article about how the recent Green Bay Packers loss can impact the mental health of fans. “I noticed that right away when I first moved here 15 years ago—a kind of collective disappointment, a collective joy on Monday mornings after a game weekend, depending on the outcome,” Martin said. “I’ve also seen it elsewhere. I was in Germany for a World Cup a long time ago … when Germany lost, I think, a semifinal match. The next day, you really had a sense of the whole community being pretty depressed, despite a really great performance that season.” The story is a fun read by writer Paul Srubas, it begins, “A long, long stretch of cold, bleak days lies ahead, empty and cheerless, dull and gray … and no, that’s not a weather forecast. It’s the end of the Green Bay Packers’ fairy-tale year, from their questionable prospects in the preseason to their post-season Cinderella carriage ride to the playoffs, to the bitter disappointment of being thoroughly schooled, then dropped unceremoniously into the dustbin of sports history with the rest of the losers.” More, including the interview with Martin and others via Sound advice from experts on coping with Packers loss Sunday: Suck it up, buttercup | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

2020 UW-Green Bay Alumni Awards Collage

UW-Green Bay to recognize outstanding young and distinguished alumni at 2020 Alumni Awards Dinner, Feb. 28

LaForce President and CEO Brian Mannering will receive an Honorary Alumni Award

Green Bay, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will recognize a number of outstanding alumni and one honorary alumnus at the 2020 Alumni Awards Dinner, Friday, Feb. 28, 2020 in the Phoenix Rooms on the Green Bay Campus at 5 p.m. The event is open to the public. The cost is $50 per person. For more information, contact the UW-Green Bay Alumni Office at 920-465-2074 or alumni@uwgb.edu.

Receiving this year’s Distinguished Alumni Award are Neil Diboll ’78, Todd Jadin ’84, Paul Northway ’90 and Lisa Merkel ’00 and ’10. Diana Delbecchi ’10 and Amanda Reitz ’08 will be honored with the Outstanding Recent Alumni Award and Brian Mannering, CEO and president of LaForce, will be designated as an Honorary Alumnus.

The Alumni Awards highlight UW-Green Bay graduates and other individuals who have made special contributions to UW-Green Bay, their communities and professions. Awardees go through a nomination and selection process by committee consisting of internal staff and past Alumni Award recipients. About the awardees:

Neil Diboll
Neil Diboll

Neil Diboll ’78 (Environmental Sciences) is currently a prairie ecologist at the Prairie Nursery in Westfield, Wis. He attended the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI (Boot Camp for Biologists) during the summer of 1977. He has since worked for the U.S. Park Service in Virginia, the U.S. Forest Service in Colorado and the University of Wisconsin. In 1982, Diboll began his involvement with Prairie Nursery, producing native plants and seeds and designing native landscapes. He has since devoted his efforts to championing the use of prairie plants, as well as native trees, shrubs and wetland plants, in contemporary American landscapes. In addition to helping popularize the use of native plants long before they were “cool,” Diboll developed the first scientific methodology for designing prairie seed mixes. Diboll’s work includes designs for residential, commercial and public spaces throughout the Midwest and Northeast United States. The essence of Diboll’s philosophy is that we, as stewards of the planet, must work to preserve and increase the diversity of native plants and animals with which we share our world. The protection of our natural heritage and our soil and water resources is essential to maintaining a high quality of life for today and for the children of future generations to come.

Todd Jadin
Todd Jadin

Todd Jadin ’84 (Business Administration) is vice president of Associate Relations and Talent Management for Schneider, a premier provider of transportation, intermodal and logistics services. In this position, Jadin is responsible for delivering an exceptional associate experience on behalf of the company. He is accountable for corporate recruiting, learning and development, change management, associate relations, employment law compliance and the human capital processes—which includes performance appraisals, succession planning and overall talent management. He began his professional career with Schneider in Feb. 1985 as an extended coverage manager. Since then, he has held leadership positions in nearly every operating unit of the business. Previous roles during his 35-year tenure have included director of Network Planning, general manager of Integrated Delivery Fleet Services, senior vice president of Dedicated Services, senior vice president of Operations, vice president of Alliance Capacity and vice president of Schneider’s Mexico division. As an industry expert, he has represented Schneider on the Council of Logistics Management, the North American Transportation Alliance, the American Trucking Associations Intermodal Council and the BNSF Customer Advisory Board. He has also been recognized as a “Logistics Pro to Know” by Supply & Demand Chain Executive Magazine. Most recently, he was awarded the inaugural Don Schneider Presidential Award by Schneider in Feb. 2019. Jadin served or continues to serve his community in his role on the Board of Directors for the YMCA of Green Bay, the UW-Green Bay Founders Association and the UW-Green Bay Alumni Board of Directors. He is also a member of the Schneider Foundation core team. In addition, Jadin has been actively involved in youth basketball in the Green Bay area. He serves as president of the Green Bay Area Girls Basketball Association, he coached numerous boys and girls Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) basketball teams and he was a member of the boys’ varsity staff at Notre Dame Academy High School. He has been married to his wife, Sara, for 30 years, and together they have four children: Hanna, Kate, Dante and Tessa.

Paul Northway ’90 (Business Administration, Political Science) joined American National Bank in 2013 as part of a succession plan for key executives who were retiring. In his current role as CEO, Northway is responsible for setting the strategic direction of the local business bank, as well as being the caretaker of the company’s culture. Northway is also a member of the bank’s Board of Directors. With nearly 30 years of experience in the financial industry, Northway is very adept at developing mutually beneficial relationships throughout the community. Prior to joining American National Bank, Northway had leadership roles at Baylake Bank (regional

Paul Northway
Paul Northway

president) and Associated Bank (Commercial Banking Team leader). Northway is a lifelong resident of Northeast Wisconsin, having grown up in De Pere. He obtained an MBA at UW-Oshkosh and completed the Graduate School of Banking at the University of Wisconsin. Passionate about his alma mater, Northway and his wife, Kristin, have established a scholarship at UW-Green Bay for business students. He serves as a member of the Chancellor’s Council of Trustees. A season ticket holder for men’s basketball and a supporter of the Phoenix Fund, you will find him cheering on the Phoenix from his seats behind the bench. Additionally, Northway regularly speaks to classes on campus about the topic of selling and sales management. In 2012, he was recognized by the Cofrin School of Business as an honorary inductee into Sigma Beta Delta. Other community involvement includes service on the board of directors and executive committee of both, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Fox Valley and Curative Connections. Northway served as the chair of Curative’s Rising Tide Capital Campaign in 2018. His contributions in the community have been recognized by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Wisconsin (Marie Krohn Award) and Neighborworks Green Bay (Community Builder Award). Northway and his wife have two children, Andrew, a current UW-Green Bay student, and Aaron.

Lisa Merkel
Lisa Merkel

Lisa Merkel ’00 and ’10 (Bachelor of Science in Biology and Master of Science in Applied Leadership for Teaching and Learning) A passionate teacher, Merkel has been an educator at Green Bay West High School since 2001, where she currently teaches Physical Science and Chemistry classes. The effects of poverty on learning was the focus of her research as a graduate student at UW-Green Bay. For nearly a decade, Merkel developed and taught two graduate classes related to the education of impoverished children to area educators and administrators through the UW-Green Bay Outreach Program (now Continuing Education and Community Engagement). She contributes her expertise on the effects of poverty on learning in a variety of programs including the Green Bay West Building Leadership Team, AVID, S3 teaching teams, Student Council and the Medical College of Wisconsin Equity Team. In 2014, won an equity award from the Green Bay Education Association for her dedication and commitment to uniting cultures through education. In 2016, Merkel was awarded the Herb Kohl Foundation Fellowship Award for teaching excellence and innovation in the State of Wisconsin. In 2018, she received a Serious About STEM (SAS) grant for $100,000 from the Medical College of Wisconsin to implement the program she developed to increase positive outcomes for first-generation female students interested in STEM fields. Lisa and her husband, UW-Green Bay Professor Brian Merkel, love spending time with their three beautiful children and Jade, an unapologetically spoiled Weimaraner and true baby of the family.

Diana Delbecchi 10 (Psychology and Human Development) is a passionate social justice advocate with a key interest in refugee rights and issues around educational equity. After graduating from UW-Green Bay in 2010, she served as the University’s Student Employment and Scholarships coordinator for almost five years. Leaving to pursue her own dreams of a higher education, she moved to Ireland and received a Master’s Degree in Gender, Globalisation and Rights. Since graduating in 2016, she has spent time working abroad in a refugee camp providing educational programming for out-of-school refugee youth, where she conducted a research project that led to the design and implementation of the first youth education program in a refugee camp of 700 residents. Delbecchi also helped found a local group for resettled refugee youth in Green Bay called the United ReSisters. This group helps make the dreams of college education accessible, affordable and achievable for these young women. The group recently published a book on their experiences titled “The First Winter.” Delbecchi also served as the assistant director for a freshmen travel program at St. Norbert College and is currently the Green Bay Area Public School’s first-ever Community Schools Resource coordinator. Delbecchi was a contributing author for the scholarly publication, “Journey to Refuge: Understanding the Refugee, Exploring Trauma, and Best Practices for Newcomers and Schools.”

Amanda Reitz ’08 (Elementary Education) is the founder of Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary (HEA). She was born, raised, educated and now lives in Green Bay. Reitz’s passion is simple; she loves creating positive change for pets and people across the nation. She founded HEA at just 21-years old. This dream wasn’t supported by everyone. Her father’s words were, “forget about it…it’s never going to happen.” Ironically, he has been extensively involved every step of the way. Today, both of her parents and her brother have made HEA’s

Amanda Rietz
Amanda Rietz

mission their life’s work. Reitz founded HEA when many communities were killing more than 50% of the dogs and cats that entered their animal shelters. Since 2006, HEA has successfully paired more than 4,000 companion animals with loving families. While proud of the impact, Reitz is far from satisfied. There are still hundreds of thousands of animals dying in shelters every year. She wants to see a world where the life of every companion animal matters. Reitz has been recognized by UW-Green Bay’s Inside Magazine as a Service-Minded Alumni, the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce (1 of 20 People You Should Know), and by You Magazine (1 of 20 Women to Know). She’s also a graduate of Leadership Green Bay’s class of 2012. Grateful for her faith, her family and her community, Reitz finds the greatest joy in being able to engage her heart in the service of others—both people and pets.

Brian Mannering will receive the Honorary Alumni Award. Mannering is committed and passionate about the Green Bay community and the important role that UW-Green Bay plays in the continued growth and prosperity of Northeast Wisconsin. Although not an alumnus, the president and CEO of LaForce Inc., has demonstrated incredible support for UW-Green Bay. He is a member of the Phoenix men’s basketball golf

Brian Mannering
Brian Mannering

committee, is an avid fan, and spreads this excitement throughout the company he leads. Mannering and LaForce continue to support various initiatives throughout campus including a recent gift to the Phoenix Innovation Park and the development of the University’s new Mechanical Engineering Program. LaForce Inc., headquartered in Green Bay, Wis. with additional offices across the United States, is a leader in providing door opening solutions for life safety and building security. Mannering has a proven executive management track record with more than 30 years of experience driving sales and growth for LaForce. He began his career in shipping & receiving and has held numerous positions in the company, including vice president of sales and vice president. In 2007, he was named president of the growing company, and in 2016 he acquired the title of CEO. Mannering models efforts of community engagement and encourages LaForce employees to do the same through corporate donations and employee activities. A native of Green Bay, Mannering believes the development of a community has a strong impact on the success of a company. Mannering is a member of the Chancellor’s Council of Trustees and is an active supporter of the NEW Community Shelter. He previously served as a board member for the Green Bay Boys & Girls Club. Brian and his wife Amy have been married for 33 years and have three children: Austin, Alyssa (a UW-Green Bay graduate) and Brock.

–02-20

UW-Green Bay alumna recognized for Future 5 in Fond Du Lac

UW-Green Bay alumna Shawn Fisher (Communication Processes) ’03 was recognized as a Future 5 recipient in Fond Du Lac due to her involvement with the community and professional success. She was recently promoted to executive director of Agnesian HealthCare. She is also a member of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Scholarship Taskforce.

Lakeshore Wind Ensemble readies for concert Saturday, Jan. 18

The majestic Capitol Civic Centre will resound with classical and big band music when the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus’ Lakeshore Wind Ensemble (LWE) present “Vienna by the Lake” and the Lakeshore Big Band (LBB) delight audiences with “Anything Goes” with tunes from the Big Band era with movie music and everything in-between on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020 at 7:30 p.m. The LWE portion is conducted by Marc Sackman, professor of music and director of bands at UWO-Fox Cities and conductor and music director of the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus Lakeshore Wind Ensemble. The LBB portion is conducted by Chris Woller, guest music director and conductor.

Emily Kosloski
Emily Kosloski

Joining the LWE will be Manitowoc native and Broadway singer/Hollywood actress Emily Kosloski. The Manitowoc Lincoln High School graduate and holds a Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance and a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics from Northwestern University. She is a television and stage actress who has performed in the Broadway Company and with the National Touring Company of Les Misérables. Other theatre credits include performing on London’s West End and at the Geffen Playhouse with Joan Rivers in Joan Rivers: A Work in Progress, and in regional theaters around the country. Her television credits include recurring roles in “Weird City,” “The Fosters,” “Dallas” and guest stars on “Shameless,” “Southland,” and “I Feel Bad.” She will be singing classical music from the operas Die Fledermaus and La Bohème. Sackman’s inspiration for the program is the New Year’s Eve concert in Vienna with music by Johann Strauss, II, you may just get up from your seat and start waltzing in the aisles!

Woller and the Lakeshore Big Band will showcase tunes from the Big Band era: Anything Goes!, Roy Eldridge’s Rockin’ Chairand more! The Big Band is dedicating Chuck Mangione’s Feels so Good to late LWE Founder and Conductor Emeritus Michael J. Arendt and late fellow LBB trumpeter Glen Harcus. This song was chosen since it was played at Mike’s final Lakeshore Big Band concert. Two additional vocalists, who are also very talented, will be joining the stage for the Big Band, local favorites David Bourgeois and Kim Hofmann.

Following the concert, the audience is invited to a reception in the Capitol Civic Centre’s Mertens Family Lobby to meet the conductors, musicians and vocalists.

Tickets for the LWE & LBB concert are available at the Capitol Civic Centre Box Office and are $16 for adult seating, and $9 for students and all balcony seating. The quoted ticket prices do not include the CCC ticket fee or sales tax. For additional ticket information, you may call the CCC Box Office at 920-683-2184 or visit on the web at cccshows.org.

04-20

UW-Green Bay alumnus Senator Hansen retiring

UW-Green Bay alumni Senator Dave Hansen (History & Secondary Education) ’71 has announced he is retiring at the end of his current term after almost 20 years in office. Read more via Senator Hansen retiring: ‘It truly has been a privilege’ | wearegreenbay and Hansen retiring at end of Senate term | WHBY.

 

Theatre on the Bay at UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus to host auditions for spring play

Theatre on the Bay on the UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus will be holding auditions for its spring play, “The Importance of Being Earnest” on Feb. 12 and 13, 2020 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Herbert L. Williams Theatre, Fine Arts Building, on the Marinette Campus. All roles are available for actors ages 15 and older. Auditions are made by appointment. Prior experience with theatre or acting is not required for auditioning.

Monologues of one-to-two minutes (comedic or dramatic) are welcome, but not required for these auditions. Those auditioning should be prepared to read aloud from pieces provided at the audition. Actors are not required to attend both audition nights.

Register here. After registering, participants will be sent an audition form to complete before the audition. Participants should arrive at least 10 minutes prior to audition slots with this form completed.

Rehearsals will take place in the evenings and on weekends between approximately Feb. 17 and April 16, 2020. Performances are April 17 through 19 and April 24 through 26.

Email stonethr@uwgb.edu (preferred) or call 715-504-3318 for further information.

UW-Green Bay faculty to speak at Door County Talks

UW-Green Bay faculty are scheduled to give presentations at the 2020 Door County Talks winter series. Presenters include Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Political Science), Associate Prof. of History and Director of Student Success Vince Lowery, Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Democracy and Justice Studies) and Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Political Science). Below is a description of the presentations.

Immigration Politics: Between Rights and Restrictions with Associate Prof. Alise Coen (Saturday, Jan, 18, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Debates over U.S. immigration policy have been shaped by a complex history characterized by tensions between migration restrictions and migrant rights. To understand ongoing policy shifts regarding immigration and asylum, it is important to engage with the evolution of both nativism and human rights advocacy. International law and evolving court interpretations have also played a crucial role in immigration politics, exemplified by recent discussions about the Flores Settlement Agreement and zero tolerance policies designed to deter undocumented migrants and asylum-seekers. Coen’s presentation aims to weave together these diverse and sometimes paradoxical historical forces to help shed light on current political realities.

How Many Reconstructions Does It Take to Be Free? A Meditation on the Long Civil Rights Movement with Associate Prof. and UWGB Director of Student Success Vince Lowery (Saturday, Feb. 8, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

With the abolition of slavery, the United States entered the period of Reconstruction, which historian Eric Foner calls “the unfinished revolution.” The meaning of freedom for African-Americans, and in fact all Americans, remained in question. That “revolution” began again in the mid-twentieth century with the civil rights movement, which some historians refer to as the “Second Reconstruction.” Now fifty years removed from that event, in light of the persistence of Jim Crow-style policies and practices, many are calling for a “Third Reconstruction.” In his talk, Lowery will trace the threads connecting these three eras, exploring moments of progress and regression and the road left to travel.

Woman Suffrage 100 Years Later: Assessing Its Triumphs and Limits with Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

How did the women’s rights movement win passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, and what lesson can we learn from that victory? One hundred years after women won the constitutional right to vote, we will examine the history of the suffrage movement alongside battles that were left unfinished. We will also consider how the legacy of the suffrage movement influences the fight for gender equality today.

The Radical Vision of the American Abolitionists with Assistant Prof. Nolan Bennett (Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020 at 10 a.m.)

Speaking at a Fourth of July celebration in 1860, the formerly enslaved Frederick Douglass famously asked his audience: “Why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence?” With this fierce denunciation of American hypocrisy—that the country would celebrate liberty and equality while so many remained enslaved in the South—Douglass offered a radical vision of American history and democracy. In this talk, we will look at how those opposed to slavery (like Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, David Walker and Abraham Lincoln) offered a new, expansive reading of American ideals as they challenged the “peculiar institution.” We will consider how they looked back to the founding era and its documents and forward to a new dawn of justice. In light of that progressive outlook, we wi;; also discuss the lasting legacy of the abolitionists and how slavery continues to influence American politics and ideas.

No RSVP is required for the Door County Talks series. Freewill donations will be encouraged at the door. Coffee and bakery from Kick Ash Coffee will be available for purchase for DC Talks and Coffeehouses.