Two students set by an electronic board as they figure out calculations in one of the engineering labs inside the new STEM Center for UW-Green Bay's Mechanical Engineering Program.

Video: UW-Green Bay’s Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Craig Brecheisen knew most of his life that he wanted to become a mechanical engineering because of his love of race cars and always trying to figure out how things work. If you love to design or dig into machinery—take things apart, put things back together, and figure out how and why they work—you have it in you to become a mechanical engineer. UW-Green Bay’s Mechanical Engineering Program is the only one of its kind in Northeast Wisconsin and provides you with state-of-the-art technology and hands-on experiences in the brand-new Brown County STEM Innovation Center’s engineering labs on the Green Bay Campus. See the website for more.

Video Transcript: When you realize that you are smart enough and the whole time you were smart enough and you just needed to learn how to work. That’s where the benefit came from. I remember that aha moment that I had when I was at the tech school. Realizing that you had it in you the whole time, you just needed to do the work.

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, gave me a chance to earn my Mechanical Engineering degree without having to leave Green Bay. Wow, moment I had, it’s the first time that I ever stepped foot into the new STEM building. Technology is state-of-the-art, top-notch, and brand new. Thermodynamics would be one of my favorite classes. The other class that I really enjoyed was Finite Element Analysis. In this class, you get to create different projects i.e., front-end geometry for race cars. And then put different forces on it to see how it acts. To see if it will hold up, what your design in your head, put in a computer with real-life forces on it, will it last. You actually get something physical to see.

I feel like my instructors are more of mentors than they are the traditional professor to students. The ratio of a student to professor is really low, which allows you to build a rapport with them. They’re always willing to help you and if you’re willing to put in your time, they will help you achieve what you’re looking to achieve.

This campus will always be a huge part of me because this is the beginning of the second half of my life. Like another chapter, where I started from scratch, grew up, learned things, and then went out into the world to apply them. This university gave me a chance to achieve one of my greatest lifetime goals and that’s being a Mechanical Engineer.

Video: Associate Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies congratulates graduates

Associate Vice-Chancellor, Pieter A.P. DeHart congratulates graduating students on their upcoming commencement and final semester.

Watch the video here!

Video transcript: Greetings and congratulations to all our graduating graduate students! As we near the end of this semester, I want to extend my sincerest thanks and appreciation to the supportive faculty, staff, family, friends, and partners of our graduate students. Your flexibility and understanding have allowed for our students to persevere and succeed through a multitude of challenges. To our graduate students, I want to commend you for your work and commitment that has now led to this outstanding achievement. On behalf of myself and our team in the office of graduate studies, it has been a privilege and distinct pleasure to work so closely with each of you over the years, and we wish you a resounding success as you complete this milestone and move onto the next stages of your journey. Congratulations graduates, and go Phoenix!

Photo of Covid-19 virus magnified with the text, "COVID-19 Why it Matters, Variants and eased restrictions concern."

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 22, Variants and eased restrictions concern

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID-19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript-COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 22, Variants and eased restrictions concern

Hi Brian Merkel, great to be with you, Microbiology and Immunology UW-Green Bay and we are here to talk to you about COVID-19 and why it matters to you.

The variants, this is something that is very important when it comes to COVID-19. We are coming down off of the curve at this time, however, there are a couple things pushing up on the curve to make things worse. That has to do with the loosening of restrictions. That has to do with some of the travel patterns of individuals that we are concerned with because all of these things represent opportunities for more infections. And how that all ties into the variants.

The more opportunities this unstable virus has to infect people. And when it does infect people, we are giving more of it an opportunity to become something else. We are also giving the variants that currently exist an opportunity to become even more dangerous. There are three categories of them. There are variants of interest. Those are the least concerning but still a concern. There’s variants of concern and there’s variants of high consequence, according to the Center for Disease Control.

As of now, we do not have any variants that are variants of high consequence. We don’t want that to change. Variants of high consequence do not respond to vaccines. They do not respond to therapeutics. We don’t want to start all this all over again. Which means we have to continue to immunize. So, there’s a bit of a race.

We want to immunize as many people as possible, so we create high herd immunity to the variants that are here. Where these things still work and the original strain that causes COVID-19. And we want to continue in this fourth-quarter phase of where we are with this pandemic. To continue maintaining our distance, washing our hands, and wearing masks.

We’re all in this together and we’re so close, let’s just continue and finish it.

COVID-19 Why it Matters Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Part 11: What type of mask should I wear? https://youtu.be/gCFHxQvkVYE

Part 12: Why HUGE COVID-19 spikes in Wisconsin? https://youtu.be/OuqmXvrDApY

Part 13: Fall break, protect yourself & others https://youtu.be/h21Ed_bBTE4

Part 14: Why is COVID-19 Testing so Important? https://youtu.be/Fr9VJZZrTE0

Part 15: What are COVID-19 Antibodies? https://youtu.be/J2lfJzoUEHI

Part 16: Will the vaccine protect against new COVID-19 variants? https://youtu.be/5l58jEZv3NQ

Part 17: Vaccine myths vs reality https://youtu.be/bGqLsRRbzVk

Part 18: What is long-hauler syndrome? https://youtu.be/f11b8nFpJiE

Part 19: Spring break, protect yourself against variants https://youtu.be/15ifuIosz2c

Part 20: Vaccine Side Effects https://youtu.be/7n3touy2PUY

Part 21: I’m young, why get vaccinated? https://youtu.be/F3KaBpSUpGo

Part 22: Variants and eased restrictions concern https://youtu.be/Xlt0VsxO-UA

 

Takane Ruby Buckwheat growing inside the Lab Sciences Greenhouse at UW-Green Bay.

Video and Photos: Heirloom Plant Sale 2021

Inside the Lab Sciences Greenhouse at UW-Green Bay, the Natural and Applied Sciences academic team is growing hundreds of heirloom plants and open-pollinated cultivars for gardeners for the upcoming annual Heirloom Plant Sale to support student research.

Heirloom plants are unique and rare! Gardeners will find:

  • 59 different varieties of tomatoes,
  • 41 varieties of peppers,
  • A variety of vegetables, herbs, and a collection of flowers.
  • Overall, there are 202 different heirloom plants and open-pollinated cultivars for gardeners.

To order, go to https://www.uwgb.edu/heirloom-plant-sale/

  • Scheduled pick-up times will be held on May 13, 14, and 15.
  • Payment will be at pick up (cash or check only).
  • Masks will be required for pick-up.

Video Transcript: Hi, I’m Karen Stahlheber. I’m an Assistant Professor of Biology and a member of the Natural and Applied Sciences Unit here at UW-Green Bay.

This year we’re holding our annual Heirloom Plant Sale to support student research and visiting scientists to give seminars at our institution. Heirlooms are a really unique and special kind of plant that gardeners can choose to grow in their garden. They have been passed down through generations and have been around for a really long time. The plants that we grow are among the most flavorful and exciting that you could pick.

This year we have around 200 different varieties of peppers, and tomatoes, flowers, herbs, and even a few native plants. We have a new website, where we’ll be collecting order information and you can browse all of the different kinds of plants that are available and reserve some for yourself, and select a date to come by and pick them up from us.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Heirloom Plant Sale 2021

– Video and Photos by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication.

Photo of a group of people rice planting from a boat in the Bay of Green Bay with the text, Green Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve.

Video: Green Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

UW-Green Bay and area partners are attempting to establish a National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) for the Green Bay watershed. The NERR system is a national network of 29 sites across the coastal U.S., designed to practice and promote stewardship of coasts and estuaries through innovative research, education, and training using a place-based system of protected areas. The regional NERR designation would promote a coordinating force to manage, restore and protect the Green Bay ecosystem, with a programmatic focus on four sectors—research, education, stewardship, and training—to help protect the world’s largest freshwater estuary. https://www.uwgb.edu/national-estuarine-research-reserves

Video Transcript: Consider the greatness of water. The same amount on earth for billions of years. Nevermore, never less. Always changing, refreshing, soothing, providing, and in only one place, right here, the world’s largest freshwater estuary. It’s where a grand river joins Green Bay and greets a great lake. Providing a place to work, to enjoy, to protect, and to preserve. Now is our opportunity to embrace our great bay. As a community classroom, a center for research, a national reserve. For all the ways that water touches our lives, our recreation, our peace, our lifeline. Let’s join as one to keep it that way.

Photo of the COVID-19 virus, enlarged under a microscope with the text, "COVID-19 Why it Matters: I’m young, Why get vaccinated?"

Video: Covid-19 Series Part 21, ‘I’m young, why get vaccinated?’

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID-19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters: Part 21, I’m young, why get vaccinated?

Hi Brian Merkel, great to be with you, Microbiology and Immunology UW-Green Bay and we are here to talk to you about COVID-19 and why it matters to you.

You’re a young adult, why should you bother with getting immunized and questioning that why should I bother with this?

We all want to get back to a life that we remember and so in order to do that requires high herd immunity. Given the fact that that’s a collected goal for all of us. Trust the science, it’s sound. These vaccines are safe, they’re efficacious. We are in the fourth quarter with all this, and we need all of you. So, help us all by getting vaccinated, so we can get back to where we want to be. Thank you.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Part 11: What type of mask should I wear? https://youtu.be/gCFHxQvkVYE

Part 12: Why HUGE COVID-19 spikes in Wisconsin? https://youtu.be/OuqmXvrDApY

Part 13: Fall break, protect yourself & others https://youtu.be/h21Ed_bBTE4

Part 14: Why is COVID-19 Testing so Important? https://youtu.be/Fr9VJZZrTE0

Part 15: What are COVID-19 Antibodies? https://youtu.be/J2lfJzoUEHI

Part 16: Will the vaccine protect against new COVID-19 variants? https://youtu.be/5l58jEZv3NQ

Part 17: Vaccine myths vs reality https://youtu.be/bGqLsRRbzVk

Part 18: What is long-hauler syndrome? https://youtu.be/f11b8nFpJiE

Part 19: Spring break, protect yourself against variants https://youtu.be/15ifuIosz2c

Part 20: Vaccine Side Effects https://youtu.be/7n3touy2PUY

Part 21: I’m young, why get vaccinated? https://youtu.be/F3KaBpSUpGo

Photo of two art pieces at the 2021 Senior Show exhibit. One piece is of a white porcelain bald head with green leaves and red wine flowers attached to the left side of the head and the other is a beautiful wood table with wood table settings. Text overlay on the photo, "2021 Senior Show Exhibit Lawton Gallery UW-Green Bay."

Video: UW-Green Bay 2021 Senior Show Exhibit

The 2021 Senior Show Exhibit is on display from April 3-May 13, 2021 at the Lawton Gallery on the Green Bay Campus. Exhibition of work by senior students Carissa Crawford, Molly Gwitt, Kieran Krueger, Elyse Lemke, Brittney Meyer, Samantha Olson, and Amanda Shepard. The Lawton Gallery is located in the Theatre Hall building (Room 230). The Gallery is open during the spring semester, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. https://www.uwgb.edu/lawton-gallery

Photo of graduate wearing his cap and gown posing with his family in front of the Phoenix sculpture with the text, See you on May 15 Spring 2021 Commencement Celebration".

Video: Spring 2021 Commencement Celebration

All members of the UW-Green Bay four-campus community are welcome to participate in UW-Green Bay’s one-of-a-kind Spring 2021 Commencement Celebration, Saturday, May 15, 2021 at the Green Bay Campus.

Here’s a bit of what you can expect… Graduating students and their family, friends, and other supporters drive a route through campus and have opportunities to exit their vehicles, name/degree/honors will be announced, receive an alumni care package, their diploma cover, professional photos with Chancellor Michael Alexander, and an optional group photo in front of the Phoenix Rising statue.

Graduates can sign up in SIS (Student Information System) and should continue to watch their campus email for all Commencement-related details. Updates can also be found on the Commencement website.

Faculty and staff… we need you to help us celebrate!

This is a big day for graduating students and families, even if it looks different this year. Consider volunteering to work at the celebration and to line a portion of the route near the Weidner Center for Performing Arts (WCPA) to help celebrate our students’ graduation by holding signs, waving or cheering as graduates and their parties drive their vehicles along a pre-determined route through campus. Questions can be directed to commencement@uwgb.edu.

Volunteer to work and/or sign up for the cheer section here

Watch the video to see just what to expect…

 

Photo of a UW-Green Bay nursing student using an otoscope on a high-tech mannequin inside the new Nursing Skills Center at the Green Bay campus.

Video: UW-Green Bay’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program

As a young girl, Grace was drawn to jump in and help when somebody was sick or injured. If you have a calling to take care of people—become a nurse. Get started today at this website. UW-Green Bay’s Nursing Program provides you with hands-on nursing experiences in a variety of medical settings in the greater Green Bay area. The Aurora BayCare Medical Center Nursing Skills Center gives nursing students real-life experiences using high-tech patient simulators to prepare students for their hands-on, hospital-site clinicals. For more information visit https://www.uwgb.edu/bsn-traditional/.

UW-Green Bay: B.S. Nursing Program Video Transcript: 

When people get sick or ill or their even upset like its emotional, you want to help them. And I feel like a lot of people turn away from that and I was always interested in jumping into it. If that’s you, you know you want to take care of people or you want to push yourself to be a nurse and go through nursing school, I think that this is the opportunity.

UW-Green Bay offers that.

A lot of hospitals actually require that you have your BSN within five years of hire. So, it’s awesome that Green Bay offers an opportunity for you to get your BSN and not have to go back to school. You can just be done, and work and I think that’s awesome.

The professors at UW-Green Bay are very approachable and knowledgeable and are RNs and nurses themselves, so they’re able to make students feel ready to go into the nursing field because of all the opportunities you have in clinical as well as in the simulation lab, where your able to practice on patients and then take it out into clinical and be with real patients so when you start your first nursing job you’re ready to go because you had years of experience.

The thing I enjoy the most about the Nursing Program at UW-Green Bay is the ability to take classes that you’re focused on and like what you want to take to your specialty and the advisors do a really nice job of making sure you’re getting to where you want to go.

After graduation from UW-Green Bay, I hope to be a NICU nurse and I feel that after all this, all the schooling that I’m going to feel very fulfilled with my journey through UW-Green Bay and their ability to give me what I needed from them and to move forward and take into the real world as a nurse.

I’m really excited to work with patients and their families. Even like the tiniest of patients because I feel that the experiences that I’ve gained through UW-Green Bay have made me the person that can take care of anyone. Especially little ones. When it comes to nursing you just know that, it’s something you need to do.