Video/photos take you back through 50 years of Jazz Fest

Looking forward to Jazz Fest 50 this Saturday, Jan. 25? Take a peek into the past through these photos capturing different Jazz Fests throughout the years, provided by the UW-Green Bay Archives and Area Research Center.

Jazz Fest, the second oldest jazz festival in Wisconsin, invites middle and high school jazz bands from across the state to celebrate the joy of jazz music! In addition to workshops and classes, these bands also participate in an afternoon concert on the last day of the event. This year’s concert is on Saturday, Jan. 25 at 4 p.m. in the Cofrin Family Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts; this concert is free, and the public is welcomed and encouraged to attend. This year’s high school band guests include Ashwaubenon High School, Green Bay East High School, Pulaski Middle School, Pulaski High School, Two Rivers High School, Evansville High School, Preble High School, West DePere High School, Bay Port High School and Jefferson High School. The Jazz Fest celebration will be capped off with a concert by The Dirty Dozen Brass Band and The Squirrel Nut Zippers at the Weidner Center on Saturday, Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased here.

Read more about Jazz Fest and its history here, or contact Adam Gaines at 920-465-2440 or gainesa@uwgb.edu with any questions.

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Jazz Fest Photos from Archives

– Photos provided by the UW-Green Bay Archives and Area Research Center

Video: Cheering on the Pack is fun for Phoenix Cheer Team

While it may be common for college cheerleaders to cheer on football teams, not many college cheerleaders can say they cheer for their local NFL football team. Green Bay Phoenix Cheer Team, along with St. Norbert College cheerleaders, are collegiate cheerleaders of the Green Bay Packers, of which UW-Green Bay is a Higher Education Partner. They showed their support for the Packers at a number of pep rallies, and of course, they were present at Lambeau Field on Sunday, Jan. 12 for the Packers play-off win against the Seattle Seahawks. Members of the Cheer Team call it an “amazing opportunity” to cheer for both the Phoenix and the Packers.

Video: Gaines talks Jazz Fest 50 in preparing for Jan. 25 event

Jazz Fest is celebrating its 50th anniversary starting on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020 on UW-Green Bay’s campus. Associate Prof. of Music Adam Gaines explains the history of Jazz Fest and what people can expect from this year’s lineup. Below is the list of events:

  • Thursday, January 23 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Join jazz alumni at the Blue Opus, 1390 Bellevue St, Green Bay, for music and socializing. Suggested donation of $10 at the door with funds going towards the UWGB Jazz Ensemble tour of Slovakia.
  • Saturday, January 25 at 4 p.m.: A half dozen area school Jazz bands will take part in a FREE public concert. The concert will be held in the Cofrin Family Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.
  • Saturday, January 25 at 7:30 p.m.: The Dirty Dozen Brass Band & The Squirrel Nut Zippers concert at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets start at $20.50. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.weidnercenter.com/events.

 

Marinette CEO Cindy Bailey joins with NWTC for ‘Our Town’ Broadcast

Hometown Radio (103.7) for the cities of Menominee, Michigan and Marinette, Wisconsin featured UW-Green Bay, Marinettte Campus CEO Cindy Bailey and Dean of NWTC, Marinette  Campus, Jennifer Flatt on its show called “Our Town.” They were discussing the relatively new Marinette Area Higher Education Coalition. The coalition is a partnership between the institutions, much like UW-Green Bay and NWTC (Green Bay’s) Crossing the Bridge. The coalition works to streamline duplication and provide and expand offering of degrees and credentials in the M & M area. You can listen to the full broadcast.

Video, photos and podcast links: Common CAHSS 2019

In recognition of world Human Rights Day on Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences hosted the inaugural Common CAHSS 2019: Human Rights event at the Weidner Center. This year marked the 71st anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Throughout the day, there was a total of 30 scheduled activities, capped off with keynote speaker Rais Bhuiyan, founder of the non-profit “World Without Hate.”

The day began with welcoming remarks to kick things off and quickly moved into various presentations by faculty, staff and students. Some presentations included “With Murderous Intent: The Right to Violence in Ancient Greece” presented by Michael Holstead, “Contemporary Artists as Activists” presented by Sam Watson’s Contemporary Art 203 class, and “‘Living Deliberately:’ Discovering and Exceeding Thoreau” presented by Prof. Rebecca Nesvet’s English and Humanities Capstone students. In addition, there were four live podcast recordings during the afternoon sessions, details are below.

Podcasts

Four Phoenix Studios network podcast episodes were recorded live from at this event. Recordings are now available for listeners on SoundCloud and iTunes.

Photo Gallery

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Common CAHSS - 2019

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication
– Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Video: Platinum Shoe Toss

It’s a tradition of UW-Green Bay graduates to leave a bit of themselves behind as they depart campus. Many toss a pair of old sneakers into the “Shoe Tree.” Symbolic to UW-Green Bay’s 100th Commencement, student speaker Hannah Malmberg tossed her platinum-coated sneakers .

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Hannah Malmberg Throwing Platinum Shoes

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Video: (Pet) Therapy in the happiest form

Every college student (and some faculty and staff) need a bit of stress relief near final exams. Members of the Packerland Kennel Club and their outreach dogs paired-up with the Cofrin Library to provide pure happiness.

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Dogs in Library December 2019

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Prof. Patricia Terry giving her commencement address

‘Set lofty goals and never be limited by someone else’s perception of your abilities,’ Prof. Terry tells grads

Prof. Patricia Terry’s address to UW-Green Bay’s 100th graduating class, Dec. 14, 2019.

Prof. Patricia Terry giving the UW-Green Bay Commencement Address
Prof. Patricia Terry

“Graduates, you may not think you have much in common with the faculty that have challenged you—sometimes way beyond the point of frustration, to questioning if our motives aren’t really just to torment you.  However, most of us have one thing in common—family and their expectations; Family that have supported us, loved us, and also occasionally also pushed us to heights of frustration. Even today, I continue to have some entertaining conversations with my family.

Every time he has seen me for the past 20 plus years, my father has told me that I have far exceeded his expectations for me and every time he says this, I have the same response: I may have exceeded your expectations for me, but I have not yet reached mine. I say to you, as you embark on your future, set lofty goals for yourself and never be limited by someone else’s perception of you and your abilities. Don’t ever let anyone but yourself define who you are and what makes you successful. Only you know what your life goals are and only you can know how good is good enough. Never live by anyone else’s standards for you. One thing I wish for you is that you will always like and respect the person you see in the mirror each day. If you live your life in a way that assures you will like the person you are, you will be truly successful. Be warned, though, this is much easier said than done. You will find times when it would be easy to put your head down and follow the crowd or chose not to speak up, even when you know someone needs to.  Being the person with the moral courage to speak up or do the right thing, even if it goes against the actions or opinions of those around you, is hard. It may cost you friends; it may not be the best thing for your career. But, if you can have the moral courage to stand up for what is right, regardless of the consequences, you will always respect yourself and that is the most important kind of success.

Many years ago, my parents came to watch me compete in a 50 mile ultramarathon. At the end of a grueling day, my father, always ready with a sage comment, stood over me laying on the ground in exhaustion and made the astute observation, “You didn’t win.” Equally ready with the astute reply, I said, “Yes I did. You don’t always have to finish first to win the race. I wanted to know if I had what it took to run 50 miles and now I know the answer is yes. By that standard, I won.” Most of life is analogous to an ultramarathon. You all just finished one by completing a major and earning your degree. You may not have the highest gpa or the highest standing in your major, but you won the race by graduating. In any ultramarathon, there are always one or two or three times when you are no longer having fun and quitting sounds like a good idea. But, if you can focus on the end goal and remember that achieving it is more important than any momentary desire to quit, you will always win. When asked why I do ultramarathons, I use the life analogy.

Life is a series of ultramarathons and many goals require you to keep putting one foot in front of another, ignoring the voice in your head that wants to quit, and persevere even when the race is not that fun anymore. You may even trip and fall and have to get up, dust yourself off, ignore a little blood, and get moving again. That mindset got me through a Ph.D. in engineering, the exhausting process of getting tenure as a new faculty member, and many other long-term goals. The important thing is that you challenge yourself and give every attempt the best you have. You may not always be the fastest, strongest, smartest, or most talented person in any endeavor, but accept the challenge, run the race anyway. Life is a series of ultramarathons. Don’t spend yours on the sidelines watching people you think are better compete. Live life to the fullest, lace on your running shoes, and claim your place at the starting line. Most of the time, you won’t cross the finish line first, but if you join the grand race that is life and live it to its fullest, you are a winner.

I will leave you with a line from one of my favorite songs, “If you get the choice to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance.”