Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: Week ahead: Performances arriving or no longer in calendar, part 22

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WFRV) – Along with a few performances that are happening live with in-person audiences, below is an overview of performances that were to take place in Northeastern Wisconsin in the coming week. Due to the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, the “was arriving,” etc. events are canceled or postponed.

Source: Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: Week ahead: Performances arriving or no longer in calendar, part 22

Photo of the UW-Green Bay Pep Band playing music during a Women's Basketball game in the Kress Center.

Video: UW-Green Bay is a place where music students take it to the next level

Throughout middle and high school, Kameron Jennings knew he wanted to help kids learn and thrive in music. The junior Music Education major plays trumpet and says he has had amazing opportunities at UW-Green Bay including learning from master musicians and performing in Wind Ensemble, Jazz Band and Pep Band. And stepping on stage to play his trumpet at one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers—the Weidner Center for Performing Arts—just a few paces away from his classrooms and music rooms? A priceless opportunity.

Video by Sue Pischke, University Marketing and Communication

Music Program Video Transcript:

In high school, my band class was the biggest motivation for me to become a music major. I loved my band director in high school and middle school and both of them just really helped me see that I wanted to do that later in my life and they inspired me to become a music major. I chose UW-Green Bay for my education because I knew how exceptional the music program was.

There’s two-degree options so students can either get a Bachelor of Music or a Bachelor of Arts in Music which means that you can go on to be a music teacher, have a career in musical performance, or pursue a graduate study program in music.

There are many aspects I enjoy the music program one of my favorites is being able to perform complex music with high-level musicians including the professors here and since UW-Green Bay is connected to the Weidner Center a lot of times the traveling musicians will give us master classes and teach us about their art and performances. Being able to perform in the Weidner Center is such a cool experience it’s a great space and it can really help change some people’s perspective on their music that they’re performing.

In the Music Program, almost everything is hands-on learning and in Ensemble classes were always playing our instruments and rehearsing the music and then in other classroom settings such as Music Theory we’re always writing new parts and learning about new ideas and music.

I absolutely love the Music Program here at UW-Green Bay it’s provided me so many great experiences and opportunities and I’m forever grateful to be here and I just love performing my trumpet in the Weidner Center and being able to work with all the amazing professors in all the great classes. It’s all just fantastic. I’m proud to be a Phoenix because of the countless opportunities it’s presented me it’s really kick-started my musical career in education and I have so many great experiences here I know I’ll make so many more.

DeGoey performing her livingroom recital

Determined UW-Green Bay singer performs and records her recital in her living room

Here is one determined UW-Green Bay music student… Brooke DeGoey was scheduled to give her recital on April 19, 2020, but sadly, the event was cancelled because of the COVID19 pandemic. Undeterred, DeGoey acquired her piano accompaniments (recorded by Grant Colburn), put on her recital gown and recorded her performance of Bel Piacere (Great Pleasure) in her living room!

Thanks to UW-Green Bay Music for an excerpt with details and translations of the Italian texts. As your faculty members said, “Congratulations, Brooke, on your beautiful performance and your willingness to push through the obstacles and share your music with us! We’re proud of you. You are a #CAHSSforInspiration!”

Bel Piacere (Great Pleasure)

It is great pleasure to enjoy a faithful love!
it pleases the heart.
Splendor is not measured by beauty
if it does not come from a faithful heart.
(Translation by Gillian Gingell Wormley)

“Bel Piacere” is from George Frideric Handel’s opera Agrippina written in 1709 in Venice. It tells the story of Agrippina, the mother of Nero, as she plans the downfall of the Roman Emperor Claudius in hopes that her son will take his place. Immediately after its premiere, Agrippina was an instant success in Vienna. Critics and observers praised the music, much of which was actually adapted and borrowed from other composers. The opera is still performed and recorded today.

In this scene, Poppea, the second wife of Nero, is speaking about how happy she is to have a love that is faithful and true. The irony here is that she is not speaking about her husband Nero, but his rival Claudius, whom Aggripina is trying to take down. This is one of the many scenes of irony present throughout Handel’s Agrippina.

Un Moto di Gioia ( A Feeling of Joy)

A feeling of joy
Stirs in my breast,
It proclaims delight
Amid my fears!
Let us hope that in contentment
Our distress will end
For fate and love
Are not always a tyrant.
(Translation by Bard Suverkrop)

“Un Moto di gioia” is an aria from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera Le nozze di Figaro, written in 1786. This opera is known as one of Mozart’s three “da Ponte” operas based on librettos by Lorenzo da Ponte. Le nozze di Figaro tells the story of the wedding day of Figaro and Susanna. While preparing for their day, the couple finds out that the Count plans on sabotaging their wedding. With the help of the Countess and the Count’s page, Cherubino, the two devise a plan to ruin the Count’s plot. At this point in the story, Susanna and the Countess are dressing up Cherubino as a girl in order to send him to the Count to create confusion.

The aria “Un moto di gioia” was not originally included in Le nozze di Figaro. When Mozart first composed the opera, he wrote the role of Susanna specifically for the voice of Nancy Storace. In a 1789 revival, Adriana Ferrarese del Bene, an Italian operatic singer, was slated to play Susanna and demanded that Mozart write a new aria for her vocal talents. The result was “Un moto di gioia.” In this scene, Susana is singing to Cherubina as she fits him for dress to confuse the Count. She is excited to “beat” the Count but she is also nervous about the outcome.

Stizzoso, mio stizzoso (Irritable, my irritable)

Irritable, my irritable
You behave with arrogance.
But no! It won’t help your position.
You must stay to my prohibitions
and keep silent,
and not talk!
Shut up !…Shut up!…
These are Serpina’s commands.
Shut up !…Shut up!…
These are Serpina’s commands.
Now, I think you have understood
Yes, you have captured the message,
Because it’s already been a long time
that I made acquaintance with you.
(Translation by Mario Giuseppe Genesi)

“Stizzoso, mio stizzoso” is Serpina’s aria from La Serva Padrona, written by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi in 1733. Pergolesi played a huge role in the rise and development of the pre-classical style and Italian Opera Buffa during the 18th century . Additionally, he was an accomplished violinist and organist and he wrote a handful of sacred music on top of his operas. Unfortunately, his life ended early and he passed away from tuberculosis at the age of 26.

La Serva Padrona is about an old bachelor named Uberto and his arrogant servant, Serpina, who already considers herself mistress of the household. Uberto becomes fed up with Serpina’s behavior and calls for his other servant, Verspone, to find him a wife so he can kick Serpina out. Ironically, by the end of the opera Serpina finally becomes the mistress of the household when she marries Uberto. Today, it is Pergolesi’s most frequently performed and renowned stage work.

In this scene, Uberto is planning to go out but Serpina thinks it too late. She lectures him about it, but forgets that it was she who made him late by not bringing his chocolate to him earlier. She tells him to shut up and listen to her commands in a sassy and flirty tone because while she wants him under her control, she also has a little crush on him.

Reminder: Lakeshore Wind Ensemble to perform Winds of March Concert, March 7

In Manitowoc, the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble will feature music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in its “Winds of March” concert on Saturday, March 7, 2020, at 7:30 p.m. at the Capitol Civic Centre. Marc Sackman of the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus will be conducting this performance. The concert will include performances by the first and second place winners of the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble Association’s 28th Young Artist Competition. For more information and to purchase tickets, please click here.

Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: Week ahead: Originality part of Northeastern Wisconsin theater scene

In Manitowoc, UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus Theatre will present four performances of “Big Fish: The Musical” in University Theatre of Lakeside Hall on campus. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. March 5-7 and 2 p.m. In Green Bay, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Theatre will present its final performances of Steven Dietz’ “This Random World (The Myth of Serendipity)” in Jean Weidner Theatre at 7:30 p.m. March 4-7. In Green Bay, UW-Green Bay Music will present its Concert Choir and University Singers at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 6, in Cofrin Family Hall of Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on campus. In Manitowoc, the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble will feature music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in its “Winds of March” concert at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 7, in Capitol Civic Centre. In Green Bay, UW-Green Bay Music’s 6:30 Concert Series continues at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, with “Future/Primitive: Percussion & Technology” in Cofrin Family Hall of Weidner Center for the Performing Arts on campus. In Green Bay, UW-Green Bay Music will present its Jazz Ensembles at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 11, in University Theatre of Theatre Hall on campus. In Green Bay, Weidner Center for the Performing Artswill host Joe Bonamassa at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 12. Source: Warren Gerds/Critic at Large: Week ahead: Originality part of Northeastern Wisconsin theater scene

UW-Green Bay 6:30 Concert Series Highlights Percussion & Technology, March 10

Green Bay, Wis—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay 6:30 Concert Series continues on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 with Future/Primitive: Percussion & Technology in the Cofrin Family Hall at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. The concert is free and open to the public. All 6:30 concerts begin at 6:30 p.m.

UW-Green Bay Assistant Professor Bill Sallak (Music) will explore the intersection of percussion historical roots with today’s modern technology. Sallak says, “I’ve been wanting to give a concert like this ever since coming to UW-Green Bay in 2016. It not only combines my two main musical interests, it’s a program that’s both really experimental and really fun to listen to.”

Among the pieces to be performed is Pulitzer-Prize-winner John Luther Adams’ “wail” from Mathematics of Resonant Bodies which will be presented with video by London-based video artist Natalia Jaeger. Also included in the program will be a performance of Eric Richards’ immersive Finalbells, as well as Alvin Lucier’s Nothing is Real, which is described as a visionary deconstruction of The Beatles for piano and a normal, everyday teapot—amplified.

For more information about this or other upcoming music events, please visit www.weidnercenter.com/events/. For a full listing of UW-Green Bay Music events for the 2019-20 season, please visit www.uwgb.edu/music/.

About the 6:30 Concert Series

The 6:30 Concert Series is designed to connect the campus with the community through the exploration of music. Performances feature insightful presentations by performers, composers and special guests. The series offers new perspectives on diverse styles, often exploring the music from multiple angles. All performances take place at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, begin at 6:30 PM, and last between 60 and 90 minutes. Make an evening of it – join us before the concert for a cocktail at the cash bar!

#20-20#

6:30 Concert Series continues with 10th Anniversary of ‘Miniature’ Compositions, Saturday, Feb. 29

UW-Green Bay Music’s 6:30 Concert Series continues in February with a concert filled with “miniature” compositions which will be performed by the ensemble: a very small consortium. The ensemble consists of UW-Green Bay Music faculty and friends. A miniature composition is defined as a piece containing 100 or fewer notes or lasting one minute or less. This is the 10thanniversary of this popular concert of miniatures. This year’s concert will be held on Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. in Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. The concert is open to the public and admission is free. See more.

 

6:30 Concert Series - a very small consortium

6:30 Concert Series continues with 10th Anniversary of ‘Miniature’ Compositions, Saturday, Feb. 29

Green Bay, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Music’s 6:30 Concert Series continues in February with a concert filled with “miniature” compositions which will be performed by the ensemble: a very small consortium. The ensemble consists of UW-Green Bay Music faculty and friends. A miniature composition is defined as a piece containing 100 or fewer notes or lasting one minute or less. This is the 10thanniversary of these concerts of miniatures. This year’s concert will be held on Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. in Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. The concert is open to the public and admission is free.

“Writing a miniature is the closest thing to instant gratification a composer can get,” explains UW-Green Bay Professor Michelle McQuade Dewhirst. “And yet, working in miniature form is surprisingly challenging and raises many fascinating questions about the nature of music. What sounds should or shouldn’t ‘count’ in your allotment of 100 notes? How can a composer express something meaningful in such a short amount of time, or with such limited materials? To work effectively in this format, a composer needs to refine their ideas; the best miniatures feel to me as if they might have started as lumps of coal that were compressed into diamonds.”

The miniatures which will be performed at the concert come from compositions submitted from all over the world. Receiving over 200 submissions annually, the collection is curated by McQuade Dewhirst.

For more information about this or other upcoming music events, please visit www.weidnercenter.com/events/. For a full listing of UW-Green Bay Music events for the 2019-20 season, please visit www.uwgb.edu/music/.

About the 6:30 Concert Series

The 6:30 Concert Series is designed to connect the campus with the community through the exploration of music. Performances feature insightful presentations by performers, composers, and special guests. The series offers new perspectives on diverse styles, often exploring the music from multiple angles. All performances take place at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, begin at 6:30 PM, and last between 60 and 90 minutes. Make an evening of it – join us before the concert for a cocktail at the cash bar!

About the Weidner Center

UW-Green Bay’s Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is known for its elegant design and the acoustic excellence of its 2,000-seat main hall, Cofrin Family Hall. It also houses two smaller performance spaces, the Fort Howard recital hall and the Jean Weidner Theatre, along with a dance studio and Grand Foyer. The Center is a home for UW-Green Bay Music and Theatre and Dance productions, community events and productions, and performances by visiting artists and touring companies. The Weidner Center has a distinct benefit in being part of a leading institution of higher learning. Beyond the large-scale touring productions that grace the stage, the Weidner Center also focuses on scholastic development, programming and an impactful education series – Stage Doors. The Stage Doors Education Series serves more than17,500 students from 63 cities throughout Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula every year. For more information on the Weidner Center, visit www.WeidnerCenter.com, 920-465-2726, 800-895-0071, or follow the ‘Weidner Center for the Performing Arts’ on Facebook, Twitter (@WeidnerCenter) and Instagram (@weidnercenter).

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to nearly 8,700 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

#13-20#