UW-Green Bay students play key role in calling for change

UW-Green Bay students have been playing key roles in many protests across the city of Green Bay, calling for change amid the Black Lives Matter movement. Zoe Betancourt (Democracy and Justice Studies), Hannah Beauchamp-Pope, Sierra Slaughter and Jordyn Cook (Human Biology) are inspiring examples of UW-Green Bay students dedicated to bettering their community. See this selection from the Green Bay Press-Gazette story…

Zoe Betancourt

Betancourt was one of the students who helped organize a protest. She wants to work in public policy and has a specific passion for health care, education policy and civil rights. She is involved on the UW-Green Bay campus and participated in the Jump Start Program, a mentorship program from MESA for first-year multicultural students to get acclimated to a UW-Green Bay.

Zoe Betancourt
Zoe Betancourt

Betancourt is excited to see non-black people attending these protests and their understanding of injustices in society, but also wonders why this realization took so long for some.

“I’m grateful, no doubt, people are finally coming to this realization, but in the back of my mind I’m just wondering what changed,” Betancourt said. “These things have been happening for years. So what was the tipping point?”

Hannah Beauchamp-Pope and Sierra Slaughter

Slaughter and Beauchamp-Pope at a Green Bay protest.
Slaughter and Beauchamp-Pope at a Green Bay protest.

Both aspiring lawyers, Beauchamp-Pope and Slaughter have been attending many protests lately and speaking to crowds.

Both are hoping their contributions will have a large impact, especially in reflection of the history their black family members have partook in contributed to.

“My grandfather fought in the Vietnam War. My dad has faced a lot of discrimination here in Wisconsin,” Beauchamp-Pope said. “So when I think about that, when I think about those people, and then I think about the people who will come after me — my daughter, my granddaughters — I don’t want the next generation to keep fighting the same fight my parents fought. That my grandparents fought.”

“My grandpa on my black side protested in the civil rights movement, and I think everything has just changed since then,” Slaughter said. “And hopefully, for us protesting, it can also change even more.”

Jordyn Cook

Hannah Beau champ-Pope (left) and Jordyn Cook (right). Photo by Miranda Copeland
Hannah Beau champ-Pope (left) and Jordyn Cook (right). Photo by Miranda Copeland

Cook, a UW-Green Bay women’s soccer player, has been speaking to the crowd at protests. She plans on obtaining a master’s degree in athletic training. She looks at herself as someone with passion for what she believes in.

“I’m part of this movement,” Cook said. “I think I’m doing my part to be a part of this movement. A whole is only good as the sum of its parts.”

She sees the movement as an opportunity for non-black community members to take a stance and encourages everybody to vote, especially in city and state elections that determine how communities are policed.

“And despite — because of my color, you should still love me. We should still be equal, regardless of that. So don’t say, ‘I don’t see color.’ That’s not the point. It is to see it, and love it regardless. To not treat it like less than.”

Source: Black youth activists and leaders play key roles in call for change in Green Bay amid Black Lives Matter movement | Green Bay Press Gazette

Jackson-area high school seniors reflect on recent events, look to future (includes UW-Green Bay-bound freshman)

JACKSON, MI—Graduation ceremonies were supposed to start on Thursday, May 21, around Jackson County (Michael.). But, with the novel coronavirus, plans have changed.

While senioritis was setting in big time for this group, most say they have learned from the past couple of months of the stay-at-home order. Here is a look at 31 seniors from 13 Jackson area high schools, their plans for the future and their outlook moving forward.

Libby Van Wagnen, Jackson High School

Van Wagnen, 18, is attending University of Wisconsin Green Bay to major in human biology on the pre-med track. She is also playing on the women’s soccer team.

“The corona pandemic canceled a lot of activities that I looked forward to,” she said. “I was set up to compete in the DECA national business competition in April. This summer was going to be my first season playing with a semipro soccer team. I was also booked for some very fun traveling experiences. Mostly I miss my friends and my sport.”

Source: Michigan Live.

UW-Green Bay students face fierce competition but 100 percent land dietetic internships

Every one of the 15 senior students applying for a dietetic internship (DI) program this year received a placement, according to Sara Wagner, MS, RDN, director of the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics. The DI is the next step for graduating seniors to fulfill 1,200 required practicum hours and gain the skills necessary to take the registered dietitian examination.

“Competition for dietetic internships is fierce with only 50 to 65 percent of national applicants receiving a match each year,” said Wagner. “This year all 15 senior applicants earned a match, with many of our students matched to their first choice program.”

Over the last six years UW-Green Bay has matched 82 of the 90 seniors applying (91%).

“Our success is a testament to the dedication of our students, the quality and rigor of the Nutrition and Human Biology Programs, the mentoring provided by our faculty, and high impact practices in and out of the classroom,” Wagner said.

Below is the list of students and their internship sites:

Paige Gorges– Nicholls State University, LA+
Gildardo Martinez Juarez – Viterbo University, La Crosse
Brooke Martin – Priority Nutrition Care, Boston (distance track)
Carly Herr – Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Carolynn Claussen– North Oaks Medical Center, LA
Sydney Walker – University of Kentucky Hospital, KY
Kennedi Verhoof – University of Northern Colorado (distance track)
Eric Schley – Marywood University, PA
Kirsten White – University of Houston, TX
Corey Haack – Wellness Workdays (distance track)
Emily Joppe – UW-Green Bay
Amanda Burkel – UW-Green Bay
Tad Taggart – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program
Rachel Rice – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program
Elena Garcia – UW-Green Bay Pre-Select Program

  

UW-Green Bay professor, researcher uses flies to study brain injuries in athletes | #wearegreenbay.com#

One professor and researcher at UW-Green Bay is studying traumatic brain injuries. He’s hoping the findings will have implications for athletes who suffer from concussions or CTE. But he’s not studying actual athletes, the subjects of his experiments are much smaller. Assistant Prof. Doug Brusich (Human Biology) studies how flies recover from their brain injures or if they recover at all. “Several successive injuries at a mild to moderate level result in the same sort of dysfunction as one severe injury suggesting that these more mild injuries, when coupled closely in time, is probably impactful toward outcomes,” says Brusich. Source: UW-Green Bay professor, researcher uses flies to study brain injuries in athletes | #wearegreenbay.com#

Video: Virus Without Borders

On Thursday, March 5, 2020, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Global Studies program presented “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to COVID-19,” a free, multi-disciplinary look at the Coronavirus outbreak for the University community and the public. The panel consisted of UW-Green Bay professors Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing, Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics.)

Panelists connected with local media, offered their expertise and answered audience questions. Watch the presentation below.

Video captured by: UW-Green Bay Academic Technology Services

Human Biology Seminar on bias and inclusivity in the sciences, March 6

Prior to her speaking for the NAS Seminar at 4 p.m., Prof. Andrea Romero from UW-Whitewater will be giving a Human Biology Seminar talk at 2 p.m. in Room 301 in the Environmental Sciences Building. She will explore the participation of women and people of color in the sciences, discuss what biases continue to prevent an inclusive environment and, using historical and intersectional lenses, provide recommendations for creating a more equitable culture in these fields. This talk is free and open to the public.

UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News

UW-Green Bay Profs. Brian Merkel (Human Biology), Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies) and Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) are organizing a presentation on the Coronavirus, which will feature a multidisciplinary look at the virus. The event is on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the Christie Theatre on the UW-Green Bay Campus. More via UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News. 

UW-Green Bay to present ‘Virus Without Borders’ a multi-disciplinary look at the coronavirus outbreak, March 5, 2020

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay professors Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing, Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics) will join to present, “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to the Novel Coronavirus” on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m., Christie Theater, University Union, Green Bay Campus.

The coronavirus outbreak is believed to have originated in Wuhan, China, where the first known case of the virus was detected. The International Health Regulations Emergency Committee declared the coronavirus as an international public health emergency on January, 30, 2020. Worldwide, there are now more than 60,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with at least around 1,350 deaths. For now, the virus is contained to 15 confirmed cases in the United States, with one of those cases being in Madison, Wisconsin.

This presentation, sponsored by the UW-Green Bay Global Studies program, is a multi-disciplinary look at the world’s current health crisis. It is free and open to the public.

Attention members of the media: Faculty members will be available for interviews at 2:30 outside the Christie Theatre, by RSVPing to Sue Bodilly, bodillys@uwgb.edu.

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Press release by Marketing and University Communication Assistant, Joshua Konecke

‘Virus Without Borders’ presentation on March 5 at UW-Green Bay Campus

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Professors Chris Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology) will be presenting, “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to the Novel Coronavirus” on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Christie Theater on the concourse level of the University Union on the Green Bay Campus.

The coronavirus outbreak is believed to have originated in Wuhan, China, where the first known case of the virus was detected. The International Health Regulations Emergency Committee declared the coronavirus as an international public health emergency on January, 30, 2020. Worldwide, there are now over 60,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with at least around 1,350 deaths. For now, the virus is contained to 15 confirmed cases in the United States, with one of those cases being in Madison, Wisconsin.

This event is free and open to the public.