“Virus Without Borders:” Coronavirus discussion takes center stage at UW-Green Bay | #wearegreenbay.com#

UW-Green Bay professors took a comprehensive look at the threat of and response to the Coronavirus Thursday afternoon, March 5, 2020 at the Christie Theatre. The event, called “Virus Without Borders” took place from 3 to 4:30 p.m. UW-Green Bay Professors Chris Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing), and Brian Merkel (Human Biology) covering symptoms of the virus, testing and treatment options, the current state of the outbreak, the effectiveness of a quarantine, vaccine development, and other topics related to COVID-19. The panel also spoke about how the community can help prevent the person-to-person spread of the virus. Source: “Virus Without Borders:” Coronavirus discussion takes center stage at UW–Green Bay | #wearegreenbay.com#

Video: Virus Without Borders

On Thursday, March 5, 2020, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Global Studies program presented “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to COVID-19,” a free, multi-disciplinary look at the Coronavirus outbreak for the University community and the public. The panel consisted of UW-Green Bay professors Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing, Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics.)

Panelists connected with local media, offered their expertise and answered audience questions. Watch the presentation below.

Video captured by: UW-Green Bay Academic Technology Services

MSN Program has successful CCNE Re-Accreditation Review

Congratulations to the Master of Science in Nursing Leadership and Management (MSN) faculty and staff for the completion of a successful three-day accreditation site visit from the Commission of Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Three CCNE site visitors from South Dakota, Maryland and New York state were on the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus Feb. 26-28, 2020, to review the program, facilities and curriculum, and to meet with related faculty and staff, students, practicum site mentors and community stakeholders. Prior to the visit, the MSN Chair, Janet Reilly, and NHSU Chair, Christine Vandenhouten, prepared a 70-page self-study document with digital links to supporting evidence of the quality in the MSN program in four areas: Standard I: Mission & Governance, Standard II: Institutional Commitment and Resources, Standard III: Curriculum and Teaching-Learning Practices and Standard IV: Assessment and Achievement of Program Outcomes. All four standards were met; however, during the exit interview, the CCNE team noted concerns regarding resources for the MSN program. A plan to address these concerns will be developed and implemented. Thanks are extended to everyone who welcomed and met with the CCNE team during their time on campus!

UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News

UW-Green Bay Profs. Brian Merkel (Human Biology), Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies) and Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) are organizing a presentation on the Coronavirus, which will feature a multidisciplinary look at the virus. The event is on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the Christie Theatre on the UW-Green Bay Campus. More via UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News. 

UW-Green Bay to present ‘Virus Without Borders’ a multi-disciplinary look at the coronavirus outbreak, March 5, 2020

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay professors Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing, Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics) will join to present, “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to the Novel Coronavirus” on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m., Christie Theater, University Union, Green Bay Campus.

The coronavirus outbreak is believed to have originated in Wuhan, China, where the first known case of the virus was detected. The International Health Regulations Emergency Committee declared the coronavirus as an international public health emergency on January, 30, 2020. Worldwide, there are now more than 60,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with at least around 1,350 deaths. For now, the virus is contained to 15 confirmed cases in the United States, with one of those cases being in Madison, Wisconsin.

This presentation, sponsored by the UW-Green Bay Global Studies program, is a multi-disciplinary look at the world’s current health crisis. It is free and open to the public.

Attention members of the media: Faculty members will be available for interviews at 2:30 outside the Christie Theatre, by RSVPing to Sue Bodilly, bodillys@uwgb.edu.

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Press release by Marketing and University Communication Assistant, Joshua Konecke

‘Virus Without Borders’ presentation on March 5 at UW-Green Bay Campus

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Professors Chris Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology) will be presenting, “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to the Novel Coronavirus” on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the Christie Theater on the concourse level of the University Union on the Green Bay Campus.

The coronavirus outbreak is believed to have originated in Wuhan, China, where the first known case of the virus was detected. The International Health Regulations Emergency Committee declared the coronavirus as an international public health emergency on January, 30, 2020. Worldwide, there are now over 60,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus, with at least around 1,350 deaths. For now, the virus is contained to 15 confirmed cases in the United States, with one of those cases being in Madison, Wisconsin.

This event is free and open to the public.

Meredith and Lepak-Gallagher invited to speak at Door County Caregiver Conference

Profs. Sarah Meredith (Music) and Dean Susan Lepak-Gallagher (Nursing) were invited to the Door County Caregiver Conference “Engaging Minds, Empowering Success” on Nov. 15, 2019 at the Aging and Disability Resource Center in Sturgeon Bay. They presented on the “Healing Power of Music” to two groups of caregivers who learned how music can be used to enrich the lives of those with a health condition and how it can be part of taking care of themselves. Various types of music and characteristics of music (e.g., tempo, rhythm) were given as examples for impacting general well-being and specific health conditions (e.g., dementia, Parkinson’s disease).

Ginger Turck

Veteran Marine Nurses a Dream

After a long journey, Ginger Turck graduates with a BSN on Saturday

Ginger Turck’s journey across the Weidner Center stage on Saturday, Dec. 14 for UW-Green Bay Commencement will be just like any other graduate. But few others have made more stops along the way.

This mother of three, Marine Corps veteran with a Business Administration degree (also from UW-Green Bay) already on her resume´—now earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)—may be the most traditional non-traditional student participating in the University’s 100th commencement ceremony, Saturday.

“She went through a long journey to be a BSN,” says Assistant Prof. of Nursing, Myunghee Jun. But Turck’s journey isn’t measured in miles—but in time and challenges.

Turck grew up a self-described “Tomboy” in the northern suburbs of Milwaukee, working in landscaping during the summers and began college 1995. She admits at the time she was more into volleyball than study hall. Originally attending college as a walk-on for the women’s volleyball team Turck soon realized “my heart wasn’t into college at this time which was reflected in my grades.”

“My parents said that if I was going to leave school, I would have to find something else to do.” So she enlisted in the Marines. “They say it was the hardest boot camp, so let’s see.” (Plus, only eight-percent of all active enlisted Marines are female, the lowest ratio in all of the U.S. military branches.) And the toughest part of boot camp? “Being away from home for three months and Parris Island sand fleas.”

It was later in field training when life handed her a lemon in the form of a hand-grenade. And this advice to anyone contemplating a similar experience—“Never throw a hand-grenade like a baseball.”

Turck was taught the correct over-the-shoulder technique, but kept throwing short of the target. “On my last try, I had an ‘I’m-going-to-show-you moment,’ so I launched it. Something didn’t feel right. I hit my target, but tore my shoulder.”

Ironically, it was that injury that would eventually lead her to nursing and her advocation to work in a VA clinic. Turck was separated from her reserve unit, which was activated and sent to Iraq in 2003 for Operation Enduring Freedom. She returned to Green Bay as an active reservist but saw her civilian prospects landing her back into landscaping. But her commanding officer offered a bit of advice. “My captain told me I should do something else besides digging dirt and suggested school.”

In 2006, Turck was medically separated from the Marine Corps and was sent to the Milwaukee VA for evaluation of her continuing shoulder/wrist problems. Her biggest problem? Being a woman in the VA healthcare system. “I would go into my appointment and staff would look at me and ask ‘Where’s the veteran? He needs to check in himself,’ seemingly confused as many said they had never treated a woman veteran before.”

With a second chance at college, now married (to a fellow Marine), Turck graduated from UW-Green Bay with a degree in Business Administration (Management and Finance) in 2008. And this time, she credits her professors with putting her “heart back into learning.”

This time odd timing was just bad timing—she hit the streets with a fresh degree and into the teeth of the great recession. Finding it impossible to find a job in banking in finance, she returned to landscaping and worked as a correctional officer, while trying to rehabilitate her shoulder and her career. The bottom may have been when she temporary job as took a brief job as a test examiner. “I knew I wanted more in life” she remembers.

Turck was accepted into Vocational Rehab through the VA, began nursing school at the Rasmussen College School of Nursing and graduated as a registered nurse (RN) in 2016. But fate was not finished throwing her curve balls. Her first nursing job was at an extended care facility that soon closed its doors.

“Nursing did not start out well” She admits. And this college graduate, Marine veteran, professional landscaping, correctional officer, long-term care facility nurse and mother of three needed a break—both emotionally and professionally. She was accepted into UW-Green Bay’s RN to BSN program, designed for associate degree registered nurses looking to advance their career. She decided not to work while in school, but still life beyond the classroom presented its own challenges.

“Shortly, after beginning classes my maternal grandma’s health began declining so I helped where I could, studied when I could as my mom, who had previously helped babysit, was spending her time at appointments and in hospitals with my grandma.” Her grandmother passed away on August 19, 2018, the same day as her late stepdad’s birthday and her wedding anniversary. Turck would also say good-bye to her paternal grandmother in 2019.

But true to her Marine spirit, Turck did not retreat. “In January 2019, I gave birth to our third son at 5 a.m. and much like the birth of my first child in 2014, I again was online to introduce myself for my next nursing class that also began that day.”

It was also time to make peace with VA through both a clinical placement during the summer 2019 semester, and as a patient at the Milo C. Huempfner Department of Veterans Affairs Outpatient Clinic, which neighbors the UW-Green Bay campus.

“Throughout my time at the Green Bay clinic I have never been overlooked as being the veteran, nor forgotten as a patient.”  Or a woman, for that matter. “When I went there for treatment for my shoulder, I had to bring my one-year-old  son with me. He was crying, so my doctor held him the whole time during my examination.”

And as for what future holds, Turck sees a life still filled with challenges, but perhaps fewer holes.

“With any hope, there will soon arise a chapter called Milo C. Huempfner VA Clinic nurse and veteran patient advocate Ginger Turck, RN, BSN.”

 

Associate Lecturer Herdman inducted into American Academy of Nursing

UW-Green Bay Associate Lecturer Heather Herdman (Nursing and Health Studies) was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing in Washington, D.C. in October. Selection to the Academy is considered the highest honor in American nursing. Herdman was inducted into the 2019 Class of New Fellows with 230 other highly distinguished leaders in nursing. The Academy is comprised of about 2800 Fellows worldwide. Herdman was one of three Wisconsin nurses to be inducted this year.