Faculty note: Prof. Chu shares insights on sport psychology, sleep, and productivity in the Deep Into Sleep Podcast

Do you know many world-class athletes such as LeBron James and Usain Bolt are “sleep champions”? Assistant Prof. and Chair of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Prof. Alan Chu shares his insights on sport psychology, sleep, and productivity in the most recent episode of the Deep Into Sleep Podcast hosted by a clinical psychologist.

UW-Green Bay Psychology student Hayley Verbenten shares virtual learning advice

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrated that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Hayley Verbenten

Hayley Verbenten is a junior Psychology major with an emphasis in Mental Health and an Education minor.

“Personally, I thought I would struggle with having all online classes when we were told we would have to make the transition in spring. I was used to having one or two online classes and the rest in-person. I like the structure of having in person classes, and it serves as a reminder for me to make sure I am getting all of my homework and studying done. When moving to online classes, I tried to make sure I treated them as normal classes. I would set aside certain times and days for each class, as well as time to study and do any extra work required for the class. I always kept an assignment notebook to keep myself organized. Working ahead is always a good option if possible!

There are so many peer mentors, faculty advisors and other professors that are willing to help if you are having trouble with online classes. We also have an IT department that is great for all questions with printers, computers, etc.

The most important things are to make sure you stay organized, and don’t be afraid to reach out for help! It is better to ask for help right away than fall behind.”

Weight loss a goal? Assistant Prof. Chu has advice

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. and Chair of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Alan Chu (Psychology) shared his insights on using the power of “yet” (a growth mindset) MyFitnessPal’s post titled 8 Strategies to Boost Weight Loss, According to Psychologists. “Success in school, work, sports and almost every area of human endeavor can be dramatically influenced by our mindset about our talents and abilities,” says Prof. Chu, “A growth mindset frames abilities and situations as changeable with hard work, and a fixed mindset frames abilities as inborn and not changeable.” To try it, Chu recommends adding the word “yet” to any challenge you’re currently dealing with. For instance: I haven’t reached my ideal weight … yet. I’m not making it to the gym three times a week … yet. I haven’t figured out an eating plan that works for me … yet. These types of statements signal to your brain that even though things aren’t exactly how you want them to be right now, you can get where you want to go with time and effort.

 

UW-Green Bay student Ben Dresdow talks about virtual learning

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrated that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Ben Dresdow is a junior majoring in Psychology with a minor in Spanish.

Ben Dresdow

“My experiences both online and in person at GB have been incredibly positive. My professor’s have allowed me to grow academically and professionally both in the classroom and through outside internships. I am incredibly thankful that I chose to come to this University after I finished high school. Throughout my time here, professors have provided all the resources needed to perform well in class whether it was in person or in an online format. I am truly thankful for the past two years I spent here, and I look forward to seeing the ways I can continue to evolve and grow as I continue my college journey. I anticipate that your experiences could be equally impactful, as virtually every person I’ve met throughout the past two years have agreed that they were very satisfied with their decision to attend UW-Green Bay. I hope you all enjoy the rest of your summer, and feel free to reach out to the ambassadors over the summer!”

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Chu quoted on a podcast episode about small acts of kindness and the ripple effect of sending gratitude letters

Assistant Prof. of Psychology and Chair of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Alan Chu’s idea about the ripple effect of sending gratitude letters and small acts of kindness was quoted in the most recent episode of the Calm and Connected Podcast hosted by Janine Halloran, a licensed mental health counselor, where she shares a visual activity to help kids see how kind acts can spread and make a positive impact.

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Chu shared his insights on teaching online courses as instructors and “test driving” them as students

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. and Chair of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology Alan Chu (Psychology) shared his insights with EduMed, a higher education resources website, on teaching online courses as instructors and “test driving” them as students. Read it here.

Assistant Prof. Alan Chu quoted on initiating conversations about wearing masks | Yahoo News

In a recent Yahoo News article, there are five proposed stages of mask-wearing grief when it comes to seeing people in public not wearing masks. Assistant Prof. Alan Chu (Psychology) gives advice for how to approach people not wearing masks.

“People do not like to be forced to do things, and that’s what we are getting with non-compliance in wearing masks when people feel like they are being pushed to do so,” says Dr. Alan Chu, Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay. “Ask the following statements based on motivational interviewing techniques in order to help people take ownership to make the change you want to see.”

Here are the statements Chu suggests, with their intents:

  1. “I’m curious why you are not wearing a mask” (gathering information)
  2. “I see your point. What do you think about the research evidence that shows wearing a mask can significantly reduce chance of infection? Are you concerned about your health and your family’s?” (showing empathy, indicating facts and care, prompting thoughts)
  3. “What are the costs and benefits for you to wear a mask?” (understanding any perceived barriers and getting them to analyze the fact that there are more benefits than costs)
  4. “What would you do after this conversation in order to make this a habit during these times?” (helping them put thoughts into actions and take ownership instead of being enforced to do so)

 

Source: It’s OK to Yell at Strangers Who Don’t Wear Masks | Yahoo News

You can also find his work in Fatherly.

Alan Chu

Professor Chu talks to telecommuting company about how relaxation techniques and improving remote employee productivity

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Alan Chu (Chair of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology), spoke to Virtual Vocations, a company that helps job-seekers find telecommuting jobs, about improving remote employee productivity through mindfulness, self-compassion, and relaxation techniques. He also shared the wellness activities that the UW-Green Bay Psychology program did this spring under Chair Jenell Holstead’s leadership.