Common CAHSS

Part 3 of Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series to focus on Ecopoetics

Chris McAllister Williams
Chris McAllister Williams

Join Assistant Professor Chris McAllister Williams (English and Humanities) on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020  from 4 to 5 p.m to learn about ecopoetics. Ecopoetics is more than just poems about nature. Rather, it is poetry that positions humankind in relationship to ‘the natural,’ embodying the tensions between ecological landscapes and late capitalism in, as scholar Lynn Keller terms it, the “self-conscious Anthropocene.” This talk will draw upon the work of bell hooks, Juliana Spahr, Forrest Gander, and others to situate the concerns of the Anthropocene—the proposed name for a new epoch when human activity is the dominant force reshaping the planet—alongside poetic approaches that seek to explore those concerns, culminating in a discussion about the interwoven nature of the ecological location, sustainability, and creativity.

To join the virtual event, visit the CAHSS and Effect website.

Famed Writer of Comics, Sci-Fi, and ‘Stranger Things’ Inspires UW-Green Bay Student Novelists

Green Bay, Wis.—A famed writer has signed-on to teach at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Author Michael Moreci is teaching the Novel Writing course for the fall 2020 semester.

Moreci is a dedicated writer and has a variety of works spanning from comic books to novels. He has been recognized by various magazines and newspapers including The Hollywood Reporter and USA Today, along with the website Comics Alliance. Some of his work includes the Science Fiction novels Black Star Renegades and We Are Mayhem, and comics Wasted Space, The Plot, Burning Fields, and Curse. He is also author of the comic feature “Stranger Things.”

Author and writer Michael Moreci

What can students expect from Moreci?

“I’m the type of person who likes to share, not hoard, knowledge,” he says. “If you want to know something about writing—creatively or professionally—you’re going to get a real and truthful answer from me. Always.”

Novel Writing will run through December and is a fall-only course. It gives students an opportunity to gain experience with writing and workshopping a 50,000-word novel as credit option for students majoring in English or Writing and Applied Arts.

Program Director Rebecca Meacham is thrilled. “Mike offers insights from his experience as a professional writer,” she says. “He knows both the craft and the business of writing, especially in the genres that many students love best—horror, supernatural, sci fi, comics.”

This semester, Moreci’s goal is to give students confidence and help expand their knowledge of the industry. “My approach is boots-on-the-ground; it’s about what it means to be a working writer and how to become one. I want my students leaving my class knowing that they can write a book and, more importantly, what to do after.”

For a tour of Michael Moreci’s workspace, check out his link: https://youtu.be/oT6kY8Ev0h4.

Press release written and submitted by Elizabeth Asmus, creative intern, English program, UW-Green Bay

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Video: Pestilence and Print History recorded event

On September 17, 2020, a virtual public program called Pestilence and Print History organized by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) in Massachusetts took place. UW-Green Bay’s own assistant professor Sarah Schuetze (English) was one of the speakers during the event.

In this panel presentation, scholars David Paul Nord, Assistant Prof. Sarah Schuetze, and Kelly Wisecup examined case studies of epidemics in early America through the lens of printed material to answer questions such as: How did people get information about epidemics and pandemics? Who was providing that information, for what purposes, and in what print mediums? Who had access to these resources? How did people respond to them? From diphtheria to yellow fever to cholera, from medical practitioners to Indigenous writers to ordinary citizens, these case studies spanning 150 years provoke thoughtful insights into how Americans have responded to disease, past, and present. More than 200 people attended the event via Zoom. The presentation and discussion can be viewed on the AAS youtube channel.

UW-Green Bay junior Autumn Rettke was ‘blown away’ with online learning transition

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrate that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Autumn Rettke is a junior majoring in English Education and minoring in Dance.

Autumn Rettke

“When the spring classes switched from in-person to online-only, I was very concerned about my Education and Dance courses, because the two focus on elements that are best learned through in-person observation. I was blown away with how well my professors maintained the personal element of these courses while remaining completely online. We participated in discussions, group work and peer edits, which helped uphold the feeling of community that comes along with in-person classes. All of my professors offered email check-ins, over-the-phone meetings and even Zoom office hours. I always felt that my professors were not only prepared but also genuinely invested in their students’ well-being.”

 

All are welcome to join Associate Prof. Nesvet and a workshop on publication and teaching on July 25

On Saturday, July 25, Associate Prof. Nesvet (English) will present as part of the North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA) online workshop “Making use of COVE & BRANCH for Teaching and Research.”

This workshop will showcase the use of COVE tools for publication and teaching. Anyone is welcome to register for this workshop; up to 300 participants can be accommodated; however, only a few spaces remain. To register, click here by 5 p.m. ET on Thursday, July 23.

Registrants should look out for an email reminder the day before the event and Zoom log-in details the day of the event from coveeditions@gmail.com. Please send any questions to Associate Prof. Nesvet at nesvetr@uwgb.edu.

Some of the questions we will address in the workshop include:

  • How can I teach asynchronously?
  • How can I help students read better?
  • How can I get all my course texts for $10?
  • How can I build annotated timelines and maps?
  • How can I facilitate student research?
  • How can I build exhibits with students?
  • How can I keep track of student activity?
  • How can I link up courses across the world?
  • How can I upload my own course texts?
  • How can I support open-access scholarship?

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Case publishes article

Assistant Prof. Julialicia Case (English & Humanities) recently published the article, “Our Bodies, Our Incoherent Selves: Games and Shifting Concepts of Identity and Narrative in Contemporary Storytelling” in Storyworlds: A Journal of Narrative Studies, published by the University of Nebraska Press. This article examines digital games such as 80 Days and Disco Elysium in connection with contemporary literature by George Saunders and other writers to argue that multimedia experiences are spurring important, widespread cultural changes in what we expect from narrative and storytelling.

Faculty note: Associate Prof. Van Slooten participated in live roundtable

Associate Professor Jessica Lyn Van Slooten (English, Writing Foundations, Women’s and Gender Studies, Humanities) was an invited participant in a roundtable discussion, “The Role of Romance Scholarship: Why Does it Matter?” on Friday, July 10. This live roundtable was part of the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance Digital Showcase, featured participants from around the world, and can be viewed here: “The Role of Romance Scholarship: Why Does it Matter?”

Faculty note: Associate Prof. Van Slooten appeared on four recent podcast episodes

Assocaite Prof. Jessica Lyn Van Slooten (English, Writing Foundations, Women’s and Gender Studies) was a guest on four recent episodes of the Shelf Love podcast. Van Slooten joined host Andrea Martucci and several romance authors to discuss friendship (episode 48), fantasy (episode 43),  food (episode 37), and parenthood (episode 36) in romance novels.

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet has two articles accepted for publication

This month, Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English) has had two research articles accepted for publication. “The Mystery of Sweeney Todd: G.A. Sala’s Desperate Solution” will appear in the Victorian Institute Journal. “1837: Death of ‘Miss Whitehead, “the Bank Nun,'” in the Britain, Representation, and Nineteenth-Century History (BRANCH) Collective’s peer-reviewed, open-access hypertext timeline.

The BRANCH Collective is a project supported by the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVSA) and other Victorianist societies. Both articles will appear in late summer or early fall 2020 and concern the works of penny fiction author James Malcolm Rymer (1814-84), creator of the urban myth of Sweeney Todd and an author deeply invested in working-class political self-determination. Neither article would have been completed this past term without the invaluable assistance of the amazing librarians at Cofrin Library and elsewhere in the UW system.

Thank you, librarians, for making it possible for research of some kind to continue at UWGB in spite of the necessary closure of our physical campus.