Faculty note: Associate Prof. Van Slooten appeared on four recent podcast episodes

Assocaite Prof. Jessica Lyn Van Slooten (English, Writing Foundations, Women’s and Gender Studies) was a guest on four recent episodes of the Shelf Love podcast. Van Slooten joined host Andrea Martucci and several romance authors to discuss friendship (episode 48), fantasy (episode 43),  food (episode 37), and parenthood (episode 36) in romance novels.

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet has two articles accepted for publication

This month, Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English) has had two research articles accepted for publication. “The Mystery of Sweeney Todd: G.A. Sala’s Desperate Solution” will appear in the Victorian Institute Journal. “1837: Death of ‘Miss Whitehead, “the Bank Nun,'” in the Britain, Representation, and Nineteenth-Century History (BRANCH) Collective’s peer-reviewed, open-access hypertext timeline.

The BRANCH Collective is a project supported by the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVSA) and other Victorianist societies. Both articles will appear in late summer or early fall 2020 and concern the works of penny fiction author James Malcolm Rymer (1814-84), creator of the urban myth of Sweeney Todd and an author deeply invested in working-class political self-determination. Neither article would have been completed this past term without the invaluable assistance of the amazing librarians at Cofrin Library and elsewhere in the UW system.

Thank you, librarians, for making it possible for research of some kind to continue at UWGB in spite of the necessary closure of our physical campus.

How To Keep A Pandemic Diary (And Write Better) | Wisconsin Public Radio with Rebecca Meacham

The state historical society and other archivists want people to keep diaries of their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. We discuss tips for writing and keeping a journal with three Wisconsin authors. Host(s): Kate Archer Kent. Guest(s): Stephanie Bodeen, UW-Green Bay Prof. Rebecca Meacham and Patricia Skalka. Source: How To Keep A Pandemic Diary (And Write Better) | Wisconsin Public Radio

Prof. Meacham will be a guest on WPR’s Kate Archer show

Prof. Rebecca Meacham (English, Humanities, Women’s and Gender Studies) and authors Patricia Skalka and Stephanie Bodeen will  talk about writing, and keeping a journal, during the pandemic on the Kate Archer Kent show on WPR on Friday, April 24, 2020. At present she is scheduled for the 6 to 7 a.m. time slot.

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet has a new publication

Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English, Women’s and Gender Studies, Humanities) has contributed two articles to the forthcoming PALGRAVE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF WOMEN’S WRITING, edited by Lesa Scholl (University of Queensland, Australia). The articles concern “Victorian Vegetarianism” and its female literary advocates and detractors, and “Julia Constance Fletcher (1853-1938).” An American travel writer, novelist, translator and playwright born in South America, Fletcher spent most of her adult life in Italy, writing for British audiences. She was the first author to base a literary character on her friend Oscar Wilde, who dedicated his undergraduate poem RAVENNA, winner of Oxford University’s prestigious Newdigate Prize for Poetry, to her. Fletcher’s literary achievements include her proto-feminist travel romance MIRAGE, her translation of the Italian Renaissance poet Gaspara Stampa, and her play THE FANTASTICKS. Loosely adapted from Edmond Rostand’s LES ROMANESQUES, THE FANTASTICKS was later(1960) adapted by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones to create the world’s longest-running musical–without attribution to Fletcher.

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet Receives Huntington Library Research Grant

The Huntington Library, a major research library, archive, and foundation in San Marino, California, has awarded UW-Green Bay Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English) a grant for research travel to the United Kingdom. One of six recipients of the 2020 Huntington Library UK travel grants, Prof. Nesvet will be able to conduct research on penny fiction author James Malcolm Rymer (1814-84) at the British Library and the Guildhall sometime in 2020, provided that the COVID-19 pandemic has been neutralized by all our efforts. This year, Prof. Nesvet’s research on Rymer has been published in the journals Nineteenth Century Studies and Victorian Popular Fiction Journal, and is forthcoming in edited volumes on the Victorian Vampire and Class in Literature.

UW-Green Bay students settle in to new lifestyle despite pandemic

In this story, May 2020 graduate Joshua Konecke, a Marketing and University Communication intern, describes how he and other students are adapting in an unprecedented learning and work environment.

It’s been an unprecedented four weeks as the world practices social distancing and staying at home in hopes of flattening the curve and slowing the spread of the Coronavirus. Students have been participating in receiving education from their residences through alternative delivery methods the past three weeks. This pandemic has brought about abrupt changes to our everyday life and has forced students to adapt to these circumstances. Everyone handles change differently, but the challenges we face are quite similar.

I am a senior graduating in May majoring in Communication and English. I moved out of my apartment on campus on March 18, and have been living at home since. I’ve found the delivery of online classes hasn’t been too difficult to adjust to, although I usually take at least one online class per semester, so I’ve had experience working with different methods of educational content delivery. The most difficult adjustment is maintaining a normal routine. Back in the day when classes were held on campus, which feels like an eternity ago, my Mondays and Wednesdays were the same, as well as my Tuesdays and Thursdays. There was a normal routine. Now, any given day could be entirely different depending on what I have to get done that week and when I have to get it done by.

While I don’t have a normal routine anymore, I maintain a semblance of normalcy by trying to work in 60-minute increments. Each day, I try and do something productive, whether it be homework, work, job searches, ect. four to five times a day in 60-minute segments. That way, I am being productive every day during different periods of the day, so I never go too long feeling like I’m not accomplishing anything.

Morgan Johnson, a junior earning a BFA in Writing and Applied Arts, with a minor in Arts Management, also has moved back home for the remainder of the semester. She has found it beneficial to try and do the homework for each class on the same days which she would have normally had the classes in-person. “It’s the best way I’ve found to hold myself accountable and make sure I don’t procrastinate,” she said.

Additionally, Morgan has tried to make her home feel more academic, as she hasn’t done many homework assignments at home since high school. While the first week of online learning was definitely an adjustment period for her, once she figured out how to make her room feel more like her dorm, she was able to better acclimate to learning from home, allowing her to maintain familiarity through routine study and organizational habits she had on campus. “Once I did that, I felt more motivated to do work,” Morgan said.

Another graduating student this May, Zach Schneider, majoring in English, Humanities and earning a BFA in Writing and Applied Arts, with a minor in Education, elected to stay on campus. Zach is used to seeing people move through the residence halls, but now there isn’t many people. “It’s a bit eerie living on campus. The place is pretty dead,” said Zach. People have been consolidated to certain buildings so everyone has access to a kitchen, so some people abruptly got new roommates. While all of Zach’s roommates chose to stay on campus, he knows a few people who got new roommates and have struggled to adjust to that change in the midst of everything else going on. The changes with campus dining haven’t affected Zach, as he cooks for himself. “I just try to go to the grocery store less often,” said Zach.

Although Zach has lost his normal routine, he has found it helpful to make lists on virtual post-it notes of what he needs to get done each day. These lists help him keep track of due dates and deadlines for assignments and projects, which serves to keep Zach motivated. “The biggest challenge I face is motivation. I usually am great at self-motivating, but it’s a lot harder when there aren’t physical classes to keep my head straight. My strategy to overcome my lack of motivation has been being aware of due dates and the desire to finish my last semester with good grades,” Zach said.

A non-traditional student coming from California, Wayne Borowski, is a senior graduating in May majoring in English and minoring in Film and Cinema Studies. Coming from California, where he had to take months off from school at a time, this adverse situation isn’t of total unfamiliarity to Wayne, but still distressing nonetheless. “I’m a bit more adjusted now, but the first few weeks were marked by a sense of surrender and loss,” Wayne said.  Some of the classes or clubs Wayne is a part of don’t translate well to online platforms, so many projects have either been cancelled or, at the very least, considerably marred.

Wayne has noticed the days becoming jumbled here and there, and some of his usual customs have vanished, but he has found a silver lining during these tumultuous times. “There has been understanding and patience all-around, and in some ways, despite the distance between everyone, there have been moments throughout this ordeal in which I have felt closer to many of my peers and professors than perhaps I ever had before,” Wayne said. Wayne’s college journey has been anything but ordinary, but he recognizes this experience, along with his previous college experiences, will have him graduating in May as “twice the individual I had been before I embarked on this journey.”

Whether you are at home, living on campus or a non-traditional student, you are likely facing some of the same challenges. Although the last six weeks of the semester will undoubtedly be challenging for many students, it is something that we all are going through, and we will all get through, together.

Story by Marketing and University Communication intern Joshua Konecke ‘May 20
Photo –  Joshua Konecke in his new student/employee work space

Front door with colorful paper hearts taped to the side-light windows.

UW-Green Bay faculty members create a Pandemic Poetry Exchange

UW-Green Bay Professors Alise Coen (Political Science, Public & Environmental Affairs) and Jessica Van Slooten (English, Women’s & Gender Studies) were featured in a local news story for their creation of an interdisciplinary Pandemic Poetry Exchange group. The pair talked to reporter Diana Bolander for the Herald Times Reporter.

Alise Coen
Alise Coen

The group has grown to more than 200 members on Facebook and offers a supportive creative space to help cope with physical distancing.

The Facebook group is called ‘VanCoen Pandemic Poetry‘ (a combination of their last names) and has more than 225 members. The group’s guiding principle is to be ‘a supportive space for members to read, create and share original poems (broadly defined) to help cope with social distancing and quarantine-like conditions during the COVID-19 situation.

Jessica Van Slooten
Jessica Van Slooten

Both Coen and Van Slooten said they find that the group helps them feel more connected to the world while in isolation.

Coen noted: “I am comforted and inspired by our group as a supportive space for sharing art through words. The poems shared are sometimes humorous, sometimes somber and almost always descriptive of people’s different experiences and perspectives.”

 

 

A poem and photo by Van Slooten:

Front door with colorful paper hearts taped to the side-light windows.Fold the paper vertically
and curve the scissors just
so: begin with a point,
flare into generous cures,
and finish in a deep cleft.
Unfold your heart.
Remember they come in all
shapes, sizes, colors.
Make a rainbow of hearts:
love is love is love.
Put two hearts together
to form wings, and fly.
Imagine every paper heart
beating steady, strong,
a talisman to heal broken
hearts, heart failure.
Tape the hearts on windows
and doors: spread the love

Not Aleppo by Coen

Tending to street cats
In the middle of war
The man in Aleppo
Knows far more
About trying to find peace.
Me with my books
With my smart phone in bed
Using words to escape
The traps in my head
Safely sprawled under fleece.

Still, I fell nervous
In my privileged bombless nights
Mulling over viral posts
Of healthcare worker plights
And epicenter quakes.
By the light of my screen
That comforting glow
The fear is well disguised
As a thing I need to know
So I read all the takes.

New episode of Canonball Podcast

In the latest episode of Canonball, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Chuck Rybak (English and Humanistic Studies) and Prof. Ryan Martin (Psychology), talk with Prof. David Coury (Humanistic Studies and Global Studies) about Inception. Listen here. Canonball is a podcast out of Phoenix Studios at UW-Green Bay that covers the great works from a variety of disciplines. From movies to film to literature to video games, hosts Chuck Rybak and Ryan Martin discuss all things canonical.

Faculty note: Two UW-Green Bay faculty member publish chapter on Gender and SoTL with other UW co-authors

UW-Green Bay Prof. Katia Levintova (Democracy and Justice Studies, Political Science and Global Studies) and Associate Prof. Valerie Murrenus Pilmaier (Humanities, English) along with colleagues, Prof. Valerie Barske (UW-Steven’s Point, History) and Associate Professor Darci Thoune (UW-LaCrosse, English), published a chapter titled “SoTL and the Gendered Division of Labor on our Campuses” in the book “Academic Labor Beyond the College Classroom Working for Our Values,” edited by Holly Hassel and Kirsti Cole (Routledge, Dec. 2019). Their chapter discusses the gendered division of academic research and teaching labor and seeks to effect change in how SoTL (scholarship of teaching and learning) is viewed and rewarded in professional contexts. In doing so, we speak to “the value of particular types of service or research (scholarship of teaching and learning).” This collaboration is a product of UW’s Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars Program (WTFS), where four co-authors first met as part of a 2013-2014 cohort, which inspired them to continue their SoTL research and pedagogical collaboration for years to come.