Prof. Meacham presents Live Q&A with Station Eleven author this Thursday, Feb. 11 at 7 p.m.

In a free and open virtual event, UW-Green Bay Prof. Rebecca Meacham (English, Writing and Applied Arts) will interview Station Eleven author Emily St. John Mandel on Thursday, Feb. 11, at 7 p.m. CST.  A National Book Award finalist on countless major “best book” lists, Station Eleven is set in dystopian, post-pandemic Great Lakes region as a traveling symphony creates art while eluding violent threats. The event is the keynote of the NEA Big Reads: Door County program and will be broadcast via Zoom and Facebook live. 
Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85264388568…
➤ Meeting ID: 852 6438 8568
➤ Passcode: 087542

UW-Green Bay alumni recognized for extraordinary efforts as 2021 Golden Apple Teachers of Distinction

UW-Green Bay graduates impact generations! Congratulations to the UW-Green Bay alumni selected as Teachers of Distinction in the first round of the Golden Apple Awards selection process. These outstanding teachers make a big impact on the students, parents and community. The teachers of Distinction and soon-to-be announced Golden Apple recipients will be honored at the 2021 Golden Apple Awards ceremony, televised on CW14 on Wednesday, April 21, at 6 p.m. and Fox 11 on Sunday, April 25, at 5 p.m.

Individuals:

  • Jessica Bernard, Nicolet Elementary School, Graduated in 2007 with B.S., Major: Elementary Education.
  • Chuck Bretl ’88 Algoma Elementary School, Human Development
  • Michael Charles ’10 Wilder Elementary School, M.S.L. in Applied Leadership for Teaching and Learning
  • Dan Dennis ’98 Leonardo da Vinci School for Gifted Learners, Elementary Education
  • Autumn Lensmire ’16, Luxemburg-Casco Primary School, Elementary Education
  • April Neuville ’04, Father Allouez Catholic School, Elementary Education
  • Rachel Stoddard ’06, Luxemburg-Casco High School, Biology
  • Jodi Sullivan ’98, Holy Cross Catholic School, Elementary Education
  • Danielle Wied ’13, Sunnyside Elementary School, Elementary Education

Teams:

Lindsey Hilgemann ’10, Ashwaubenon High School Literacy Team, Graduated in 2010 with a B.A., Major: English, Minor: Secondary Education.

Jayme Shefchik ’06, Bay View Middle School Aquarius Team, Graduated in 2006 with a B.S., Major: Elementary Education, Minor: Psychology.

Mary Swinford, ’00, Bay View Middle School Aquarius Team, Certification in Elementary Education

Karen Kiefer ’97, The Academy Team of N.E.W. School of Innovation, History

Eric Seyler ’04, The Academy Team of N.E.W. School of Innovation, History

Tracy Wiedeman, ’00, Pulaski Community School District Full Online Learning Second Grade Team, Elementary Education.

Ryan Long, ’99, Webster Elementary Fifth-Grade Team, Elementary Education

*Additions or corrections should be sent to the Office of Alumni Relations.

 

Professors Case, Williams and Carr present on dystopian video games, Jan. 31 at 2 p.m.

On Sunday, Jan 31, at 2 p.m., as part of the NEA Big Read: Door County series on the post-pandemic set novel Station Eleven, three UW-Green Bay professors join local teens for a virtual panel discussion on dystopian games. Juli Case (English, Humanities), Chris Williams (English, Humanities), and Bryan Carr (Communication) will discuss games like Fallout and Warhammer 40K, as well as the community of gamers, and economics. Attendance is free and virtual, here.

Meacham, Kopischke and Strickland discuss how arts will save humanity, Saturday at 1 p.m.

On Saturday, Jan 30, at 1 p.m. via Zoom and Facebook Live, Rebecca Meacham (English, Humanities), Alan Kopischke (Arts Management, Theater) and Kelli Strickland, executive director of the Weidner Center for Performing Arts, will discuss how the arts sustain humanity during our darkest times. The event kicks off the NEA Big Read: Door County’s two-week program for Station Eleven, a post-pandemic novel by Emily St. John Mandel that centers on a traveling theater company, a comic book, and a museum of civilization. Attendance is free and virtual here.

NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county with help of UW-Green Bay faculty/staff

Door County Library is launching its newest NEA Big Read festival this upcoming week with all events being available virtually to the public for free, including a Keynote discussion from author Emily St. John Mandel set for February 11 at 7 pm. The library received an NEA Big Read grant along with financial support from the Women’s Fund Endowment of Door County, Carol Coryell Charitable Fund, Adele and Ed Douglass Charitable Fund, and the Kerley Family Foundation of the Door County Community Foundation, Inc. and was underwritten by the Door County Library Foundation, Door County Medical Center and the Friends of the Door County Libraries, all supporting the community reading program featuring the novel “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel.

Panelists include: Rebecca Meacham author of two award-winning fiction collections as well as professor of English and Humanities and founding member of UntitledTown Book and Author Festival. Kelli Strickland the Executive and Artistic Director of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Alan Kopischke a university lecturer in both Theater and Arts Management and founding member of the Big Read Door County among other organizations and festivals. And Bryan J. Carr an Associate Professor in the Communication, Information Science, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies programs at UW-Green Bay specializing in Mass Media and Game Studies and is one of the co-directors of the University’s Center for Games and Interactive Media.

Source: NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county – Door County Pulse

Check Out This TED Talk On Why Romance Books Are Feminist – Women.com

Most romance fans have heard people say that, as a genre, romance books are trashy, anti-feminist drivel. Of course, the vast majority of folks who say or think that have never even read a romance! Fans of the genre know nothing could be farther from the truth and this TED Talk on why romance novels are feminist backs us up!Said TED Talk was presented at the University of Wisconsin Green Bay by Associate Professor of English, Writing, and Women’s and Gender Studies, Jessica Van Slooten. The nearly-seventeen-minute video is an excellent dive into the way romance novels provide women a way to explore their desires and fantasies.

Source: Check Out This TED Talk On Why Romance Books Are Feminist – Women.com

How three heartland reporters are covering Covid-19’s surge (featuring UWGB Comm Alum)

UW-Green Bay alumna and reporter for Eau-Claire’s Leader-Telegram, Sarah Seifert featured on CNN Business video recently. Seifert graduated from UW-Green Bay in 2016 with a Communication and English degree.

Source: How three heartland reporters are covering Covid-19’s surge, CNN

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet at the Keats Letters’ Project: Keats in Quarantine

Keats

Last month, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English) and a few other Romanticists from around the world were invited to publish brief creative and critical reactions to the final surviving letter of the Romantic poet John Keats, which he dated November 30, 1820—200 years ago today. In the letter, Keats reflects upon his experience of quarantine. The reactions, in alphabetical order, are published, as of today, at the Keats Letters Project digital archive, collectively titled “Remember Me to All Friends”: Keats’s Last Letter.”