NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county with help of UW-Green Bay faculty/staff

Door County Library is launching its newest NEA Big Read festival this upcoming week with all events being available virtually to the public for free, including a Keynote discussion from author Emily St. John Mandel set for February 11 at 7 pm. The library received an NEA Big Read grant along with financial support from the Women’s Fund Endowment of Door County, Carol Coryell Charitable Fund, Adele and Ed Douglass Charitable Fund, and the Kerley Family Foundation of the Door County Community Foundation, Inc. and was underwritten by the Door County Library Foundation, Door County Medical Center and the Friends of the Door County Libraries, all supporting the community reading program featuring the novel “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel.

Panelists include: Rebecca Meacham author of two award-winning fiction collections as well as professor of English and Humanities and founding member of UntitledTown Book and Author Festival. Kelli Strickland the Executive and Artistic Director of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts. Alan Kopischke a university lecturer in both Theater and Arts Management and founding member of the Big Read Door County among other organizations and festivals. And Bryan J. Carr an Associate Professor in the Communication, Information Science, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies programs at UW-Green Bay specializing in Mass Media and Game Studies and is one of the co-directors of the University’s Center for Games and Interactive Media.

Source: NEA Big Read launches virtually in Door county – Door County Pulse

Check Out This TED Talk On Why Romance Books Are Feminist – Women.com

Most romance fans have heard people say that, as a genre, romance books are trashy, anti-feminist drivel. Of course, the vast majority of folks who say or think that have never even read a romance! Fans of the genre know nothing could be farther from the truth and this TED Talk on why romance novels are feminist backs us up!Said TED Talk was presented at the University of Wisconsin Green Bay by Associate Professor of English, Writing, and Women’s and Gender Studies, Jessica Van Slooten. The nearly-seventeen-minute video is an excellent dive into the way romance novels provide women a way to explore their desires and fantasies.

Source: Check Out This TED Talk On Why Romance Books Are Feminist – Women.com

How three heartland reporters are covering Covid-19’s surge (featuring UWGB Comm Alum)

UW-Green Bay alumna and reporter for Eau-Claire’s Leader-Telegram, Sarah Seifert featured on CNN Business video recently. Seifert graduated from UW-Green Bay in 2016 with a Communication and English degree.

Source: How three heartland reporters are covering Covid-19’s surge, CNN

Faculty note: Prof. Nesvet at the Keats Letters’ Project: Keats in Quarantine

Keats

Last month, UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Rebecca Nesvet (English) and a few other Romanticists from around the world were invited to publish brief creative and critical reactions to the final surviving letter of the Romantic poet John Keats, which he dated November 30, 1820—200 years ago today. In the letter, Keats reflects upon his experience of quarantine. The reactions, in alphabetical order, are published, as of today, at the Keats Letters Project digital archive, collectively titled “Remember Me to All Friends”: Keats’s Last Letter.”

Common CAHSS

Part 3 of Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series to focus on Ecopoetics

Chris McAllister Williams
Chris McAllister Williams

Join Assistant Professor Chris McAllister Williams (English and Humanities) on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020  from 4 to 5 p.m to learn about ecopoetics. Ecopoetics is more than just poems about nature. Rather, it is poetry that positions humankind in relationship to ‘the natural,’ embodying the tensions between ecological landscapes and late capitalism in, as scholar Lynn Keller terms it, the “self-conscious Anthropocene.” This talk will draw upon the work of bell hooks, Juliana Spahr, Forrest Gander, and others to situate the concerns of the Anthropocene—the proposed name for a new epoch when human activity is the dominant force reshaping the planet—alongside poetic approaches that seek to explore those concerns, culminating in a discussion about the interwoven nature of the ecological location, sustainability, and creativity.

To join the virtual event, visit the CAHSS and Effect website.

Famed Writer of Comics, Sci-Fi, and ‘Stranger Things’ Inspires UW-Green Bay Student Novelists

Green Bay, Wis.—A famed writer has signed-on to teach at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Author Michael Moreci is teaching the Novel Writing course for the fall 2020 semester.

Moreci is a dedicated writer and has a variety of works spanning from comic books to novels. He has been recognized by various magazines and newspapers including The Hollywood Reporter and USA Today, along with the website Comics Alliance. Some of his work includes the Science Fiction novels Black Star Renegades and We Are Mayhem, and comics Wasted Space, The Plot, Burning Fields, and Curse. He is also author of the comic feature “Stranger Things.”

Author and writer Michael Moreci

What can students expect from Moreci?

“I’m the type of person who likes to share, not hoard, knowledge,” he says. “If you want to know something about writing—creatively or professionally—you’re going to get a real and truthful answer from me. Always.”

Novel Writing will run through December and is a fall-only course. It gives students an opportunity to gain experience with writing and workshopping a 50,000-word novel as credit option for students majoring in English or Writing and Applied Arts.

Program Director Rebecca Meacham is thrilled. “Mike offers insights from his experience as a professional writer,” she says. “He knows both the craft and the business of writing, especially in the genres that many students love best—horror, supernatural, sci fi, comics.”

This semester, Moreci’s goal is to give students confidence and help expand their knowledge of the industry. “My approach is boots-on-the-ground; it’s about what it means to be a working writer and how to become one. I want my students leaving my class knowing that they can write a book and, more importantly, what to do after.”

For a tour of Michael Moreci’s workspace, check out his link: https://youtu.be/oT6kY8Ev0h4.

Press release written and submitted by Elizabeth Asmus, creative intern, English program, UW-Green Bay

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Video: Pestilence and Print History recorded event

On September 17, 2020, a virtual public program called Pestilence and Print History organized by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) in Massachusetts took place. UW-Green Bay’s own assistant professor Sarah Schuetze (English) was one of the speakers during the event.

In this panel presentation, scholars David Paul Nord, Assistant Prof. Sarah Schuetze, and Kelly Wisecup examined case studies of epidemics in early America through the lens of printed material to answer questions such as: How did people get information about epidemics and pandemics? Who was providing that information, for what purposes, and in what print mediums? Who had access to these resources? How did people respond to them? From diphtheria to yellow fever to cholera, from medical practitioners to Indigenous writers to ordinary citizens, these case studies spanning 150 years provoke thoughtful insights into how Americans have responded to disease, past, and present. More than 200 people attended the event via Zoom. The presentation and discussion can be viewed on the AAS youtube channel.

UW-Green Bay junior Autumn Rettke was ‘blown away’ with online learning transition

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrate that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Autumn Rettke is a junior majoring in English Education and minoring in Dance.

Autumn Rettke

“When the spring classes switched from in-person to online-only, I was very concerned about my Education and Dance courses, because the two focus on elements that are best learned through in-person observation. I was blown away with how well my professors maintained the personal element of these courses while remaining completely online. We participated in discussions, group work and peer edits, which helped uphold the feeling of community that comes along with in-person classes. All of my professors offered email check-ins, over-the-phone meetings and even Zoom office hours. I always felt that my professors were not only prepared but also genuinely invested in their students’ well-being.”