Photo of the NWTC, Marinette mascot the "Eagle" posing with the UW-Green Bay, Marinette mascot, the "Buccaneer" at the UW-Green Bay, Marinette campus.

Video: Marinette Area Higher Education Coalition Mascots

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus and NWTC, Marinette have been working collaboratively to provide higher education opportunities to the Marinette region through the Marinette Area Higher Education Coalition. Through the coalition, students can seamlessly transfer an NWTC associate degree into a UW-Green Bay bachelor’s degree program in five career areas: electro-mechanical technology, human services, nursing, business management and health information. Find out more: https://www.nwtc.edu/coalition or https://www.uwgb.edu/coalition 

Video Transcript – Marinette Area Higher Education Coalition Mascots: We are lucky to have two colleges right here in Marinette, which is why NWTC-Marinette and UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus share a similar mission and we’ve come together to create the Marinette Area Higher Education Coalition. The best part is students wanting a bachelor’s degree can save thousands starting at the NWTC-Marinette campus and finishing at the UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus. 

Photo of the Covid-19 virus under a microscope with the text, "Covid-19 Why it Matters, What's the Best Mask to Wear?"

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 11: What type of mask should I wear?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 11: What type of mask should I wear?:

Hi, Brian Merkel, Microbiology and Immunology UW-Green Bay.

We are continuing our video series on why COVID-19 matters. If you cannot physically separate yourself social distancing sometimes this is referred to as six feet, you are absolutely strongly encouraged to wear a face covering.

They need to cover both the nose and the mouth. That is critically important. Number two, if you are wearing something that you can reuse because it’s made up of cotton… which seems to be a very good material… it’s important that you wash these face coverings daily. Make sure that you have a supply that can accommodate your needs as you go about your business.

Now in terms of material, cotton that is tightly woven that have more than one layer seems to work very well. In terms of protection that is not recommended at this time, we talk about face shields. There are investigation studies being looked at to determine their value. At this time, we do not recommend them. And neck gaiters… studies are being done with those as well. We don’t have enough information about their utility at this time so, we do not recommend neck gators either.

One other category of face coverings that are not recommended, they’re not masks as much as they are respirators. These are N95 respirators, we reserve these for use in medical by medical personnel that have an absolute need because of the risk that they face for using those. Nor do we recommend any kind of face covering that has an exhaust valve. If you are asymptomatic and infectious and don’t know you’re infectious you are releasing that virus. As you could ultimately infect others, we recommend against their use as well.

We recommend face coverings for individuals two years and older, not younger. We do not recommend face coverings for individuals that have trouble breathing. These are conversations you should have with your health care providers to make sure you get the best guidance for your particular situation. All other individuals are strongly recommended to wear face coverings, especially if you cannot social distance when you’re going to be around individuals and there’s less than six feet of separation from you and the next individual and that’s whether it’s outside or inside. Thank you.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Part 11: What type of mask should I wear? https://youtu.be/gCFHxQvkVYE

 

 

Graphic of the Covid-19 virus enlarged under a microscope with the text, "COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 10: Where can I find accurate information?"

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 10: Where can I find accurate information?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? 

Hi, I’m Brian Merkel, Immunologist at UW-Green Bay and we’re here to talk about why Covid-19 matters to you.

Another important question that I get quite often because people want to help, they want to make sense of their world, their environment, they want to understand challenges like Covid-19. So, the question related to all of that is, where do I find accurate information?

Oftentimes during this conversation the internet comes up and the reality with the internet is although there’s a wealth of information, not all of it is useful, not all of it is valid. So, the question becomes how do I wade through all of that?

It’s a matter of identifying scientific studies and using credible internet websites a Johns Hopkins University website, Mayo Clinic, in our region Brown County Health, our Wisconsin Department of Health Services also has an incredible website in terms of information related to Covid-19 specifically. There is an opportunity to participate in something called confirmation bias. Let’s say, for example, I have some idea that Covid-19 was created by aliens. If you actually go to the internet any search engine and type in Covid-19 and aliens, it will confirm your belief. You’re going to find hits on the internet and information on the internet that confirms, that’s the confirmation bias, what your beliefs are.

Inaccurate information can be spread very quickly through social media and that creates challenges, as well. So, you’ve got the internet, we have to realize there’s good but we also have to realize there’s the potential pitfalls of the internet and if we don’t embrace those realities it becomes very difficult to deal with challenges like Covid-19. Because Covid-19 doesn’t care how we’re behaving, good, bad, or indifferent, it is what it is.

But it is a global problem and it’s a challenging problem and we don’t want to make matters worse because of the things that we’re doing.

COVID-19 Why it Matters Video Series:

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8

Part 8: Why does everyone need a flu shot this year? https://youtu.be/DGpBFj0fJkA

Part 9: What is the science behind a vaccine? https://youtu.be/eQ3FclkYaQo

Part 10: Where can I find accurate information? https://youtu.be/pLMlU5Xnkgo

Students in Assistant Professor Kelly Deuerling's Geochemistry of Natural Waters' outdoor lab use a field instrument to test the water at the mouth of the Mahon Creek in the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus.

Photos: Geochemistry of Natural Waters Outdoor Lab

Students in Assistant Professor Kelly Deuerling’s Geochemistry of Natural Waters’ outdoor lab learn about the instrumentation at the stream gauging station and use a field instrument to see where the waters from the bay of Green Bay start to influence the composition of Mahon Creek in the Cofrin Memorial Arboretum at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Geochemistry of Natural Waters Outdoor Lab

– Photos by University Marketing & Communication Intern, William S. Throndsen.

A large crane installs An Intermodal Earth Flow composting steel vessel outside the University Union delivery area.

Photos: Earth Flow Composter Installed

It’s a student-funded project that has been in the works for awhile—an Intermodal Earth Flow composting steel vessel was installed outside the University Union delivery area, recently. The composter will handle organic food waste from the University Dining, as well as food waste from plates, and dining operations on the UW-Green Bay Campus. The post-mix will be taken to a site on-campus to cure for between 2-4 months which will then yield compost that can be used. The composter has a minimum processing capacity of At least 2,000 pounds of raw organic waste per 7-day period or 660 gallons.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Earth Flow Composter Installed

– Photos by Grant Winslow

 

Photo of the covid-19 virus enlarged under a microscope with text "Covid-19 Way it Matters, Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask?

Video: COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 7 – Pandemic is not in my hometown; why wear a mask?

This video series features UW-Green Bay’s Immunologist Brian Merkel on COVID-19 and Why it Matters. This series empowers viewers with knowledge to help them navigate through the pandemic. Merkel has a Ph.D. in Microbiology & Immunology from the Medical College of Virginia. He is an associate professor in UW-Green Bay’s Human Biology & Biology programs and has an appointment at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be responding to a number of questions related to COVID19 and try to get behind the “why” it’s important to be educated in your decision-making as we navigate the pandemic together.

Video Transcript – COVID-19 Why it Matters, Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask?

Hi, I’m Brian Merkel, Immunologist at UW-Green Bay, and we’re here to talk about why COVID-19 matters to you.

One of the questions that comes up quite often and certainly people have asked me this including family members that live in certain areas of Wisconsin, where the case rate is fairly low, there just aren’t a lot of cases. And the question is put to me, why should I have to wear a mask? Why should I engage in certain safeguards when we really don’t have a lot of this here?

The reality is this is an old public health adage, which unfortunately is bearing out for COVID-19… when diseases are anywhere, they can be everywhere. Although you may not have a large number of cases in your particular hometown at a certain time, the more we all pull together and engage in these measures is going to put us in the best position to flatten the curve as they say, and get back to the life that we would like to get back to.

Let’s say, for example, an infectious individual or groups of individuals do enter your county or your hometown where you don’t particularly have a large case number if everyone is doing what they should be doing, you’re going to be proactive, you’re going to be preemptive in preventing that problem from taking a foothold in your hometown.

That’s why for a period of time we should all be engaging in these safeguards, so we can get back to where we want to be in terms of the lives we use to know before all of this. And as I always say that you know we wear our seatbelts, we obey speed laws, there are smoking bans in certain areas and the idea is that it’s designed to keep everybody safe. Because diseases become expensive and there a big drain on the economy… for all of the reasons mentioned… we are all better off just engaging this for a period of time to make sure we’re all pulling together to get rid of this thing.

COVID-19 Why it Matters: Video Series

Introduction with Brian Merkel https://youtu.be/M-yYPSPk30Q

Part 1: What are viruses and where did this one come from https://youtu.be/DYbiIv8ICgs

Part 2: Two main types of viruses https://youtu.be/O-OVk3rx96s

Part 3: Why is this virus serious? https://youtu.be/EDFyNN8i5G4

Part 4: Why wash hands/wear mask? https://youtu.be/FlcAvlt876Y

Part 5: I’m young! Why should I care? https://youtu.be/TDrEV_beY1U

Part 6: Can pandemics be stopped before they start? https://youtu.be/lgWnJZNYbFI

Part 7: Pandemic is not local, why wear a mask? https://youtu.be/IG3Sl3q-xH8