Tag: Engineering

Supercharging the future by growing | Eagle Herald

“UW-Green Bay is meeting the demand for engineers due to the manufacturing growth in the Green Bay area and the NEW North region,” said UW-Green Bay’s Dean of Science, Engineering and Technology, John Katers. “As the economy continues to shift toward one of innovation and technology—even in historically important manufacturing sectors like the paper industry—electrical engineers are in high demand. Because we have such a strong employer base in the area who can offer internships and other hands-on experiences, we can grow that kind of talent right here. It’s very exciting to be able to meet this demand.”

Source: Supercharging the future by growing | Eagle Herald

UW-Green Bay launching electrical engineering program | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

GREEN BAY–The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will expand its engineering offerings by adding a degree in electrical engineering. They started in 2015 with engineering technology degrees, mechanical, electrical and environmental, and expanded to mechanical engineering in fall 2018.

“UW-Green Bay is meeting the demand for engineers due to the manufacturing growth in the Green Bay area and the NEW North region,” said John Katers, UW-Green Bay’s dean of Science, Engineering and Technology. “As the economy continues to shift toward one of innovation and technology–even in historically important manufacturing sectors like the paper industry–electrical engineers are in high demand. Because we have such a strong employer base in the area who can offer internships and other hands-on experiences, we can grow that kind of talent right here. It’s very exciting to be able to meet this demand.”

Source: UW-Green Bay launching electrical engineering program | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

Student engineering chapter receives ‘significant improvement’ letter

Congratulations to UW-Green Bay’s American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Student Chapter on being presented the 2021 Letter of Significant Improvement. Faculty advisor Mike Holly received the recognition dated March 26, 2021.

“It is my pleasure to inform you the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay ASCE Student Chapter has been awarded this 2021 Letter of Significant Improvement. Your Chapter was recommended for this award by the Committee on Student Members based on activities recorded in the 2020 annual report.

Your Chapter has shown considerable advancement in its activities from the previous year. The Chapter’s accomplishments reflect the enthusiasm and hard work of your student officers and members, as well as your fine guidance as faculty advisor. You, the practitioner advisors, and every individual who had a part in this endeavor should be justifiably proud of his or her contribution to the development of the future of civil engineering.”

LAB Midwest features engineering labs in Brown County STEM Innovation Center

LAB Midwest, the company that worked closely with UW-Green Bay in setting up the labs in the Brown County STEM Innovation Center on the Green Bay Campus features the new engineering labs on its website. “A $1.5 million investment brought in nearly 100 new pieces of mechanical engineering equipment. The idea is to give students a way to put all their theoretical classroom knowledge to practice.”

Innovation in Aging

Technology literacy solution wins 2021 WiSys Innovation in Aging student idea competition

Grandmother’s influence motivated competition winner

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay student Cheri Branham’s plan to increase technology literacy among aging populations took first place in the WiSys Innovation in Aging student idea competition on Feb. 25.

The annual student idea competition challenges UW-Green Bay students to create innovative solutions to combat hardships and improve quality of life for an aging public. The competition gives students an opportunity to grow idea development, collaboration and public presentation skills.

“Congratulations to Cheri Branham for the excellent presentation during WiSys Innovation in Aging,” said WiSys President Arjun Sanga. “Every year, we are excited to partner with the leaders at UW-Green Bay to showcase the University’s many innovative students. Yet again, the students did a great job applying their education to an important real-world problem affecting our state. Cheri and the other students are shining examples of why the UW System’s regional campuses are collectively among the most innovative in the country.”

First Place:

Cheri Branham
Cheri Branham

Branham, who won a $1,000 prize, documented shortfalls in technology literacy among older adults, their dependency on technology and the potential to improve their quality of life through greater adoption of more technology.

Branham’s solution is to provide one-to-one assistance to older adults by making connections to young people as trainers and facilitators.

The Social Work major from Green Bay, Wis. who will graduate in May 2021, said what motivated her to enter was seeing so many flaws in the system the past year of her grandmother’s life.

“She passed away in November, so I decided to address some of the challenges, Branham said. “I originally wanted to do policy change, but decided to do something I could do immediately. In the future I plan to work with pregnant women who struggle with substance abuse and are in the Department of Corrections. There’s also a lack of programming for this population so I hope to address it in my future!”

Second Place:

A team of students—Jordan Cioni, Andrew Akin, Elly Purdy and Andy Weigel—took second place in the competition with their innovation “Choppa.” Working with recent alum Katelyn Desrochers as their advisor on the project, the team developed “Choppa” as an easy-to-use cutting board device designed for people affected by arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome or other physical limitations.

The solution won the team—which represented the UW-Green Bay Engineering Club—a $750 prize, along with a $100 award for participating as a student organization.

Third Place: 

Team C.A.L.M.—made up of UW-Green Business Administration students Cassie Bougie, Anna Eaton, Lisa Joiner and Megan Bonikowski—took third place and a $500 prize for their solution to address the negative effects of colored beverages on the mouths of older adults. The team developed a dual-ended color resistant product called “ColorStop” to protect lips and teeth from beverages such as red wine and coffee. The solution won the team a $500 prize.

To view the students’ presentations or the entire event, including a keynote by Devon Christianson, the director of Aging and Disability Resource Center of Brown County, visit wisys.org/aging or on the WiSys YouTube Channel.

WiSys Innovation in Aging is a partnership between WiSys, the UW-Green Bay College of Health, Education and Social Welfare and the UW-Green Bay Gerontology Center.

Props to the IiA Competition planning committee members who worked hard on this initiative and the competition’s first-ever virtual IiA event.  Planning members are:
Katie Turkiewicz
Brad Ricker (WiSys)
Mike Zorn
Doreen Higgins
Stephanie Rhee
Dean Von Dras
Sue Craver
Jamie Schramm
Susan Gallagher-Lepak
Ryan Kauth
Denny Christoff (student)
Rita Ebbott (student)
Adhira Sunkara (WiSys)
Organizers would also like to recognize the judges: Brian Walsh, Mary Bouchee, Liza Steffek, Dr. Jim Warpinski and Matt Geimer.

WiSys is a nonprofit organization that works with faculty, staff, students, and alumni of the UW System to facilitate cutting-edge research programs, develop and commercialize discoveries and foster a spirit of innovative and entrepreneurial thinking across the state.

VIDEO LINKS:

FULL https://youtu.be/LaGHniAiM_4

Tech Literacy: https://youtu.be/kErj9Qi8VkU

ColorStop: https://youtu.be/-czzRDCqEBI

Choppa: https://youtu.be/IiX1h8s0pN0

Keynote: https://youtu.be/P3QaVXOOZhw

Press Release by Craig Sauer, WiSys

##end##

Wisconsin Aluminum Founder Ceo Sachin Shivaran Follows An Unconventional Path

To help enhance its talent attraction efforts in the longer term, WAF recently donated $100,000 to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the UW-Green Bay Foundation. The Schwartz family, who has owned and operated the company since its founding in 1909, supported the endeavor. The scholarship is available to graduates of any Manitowoc County high school.

Source: Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry CEO Sachin Shivaram Follows An Unconventional Path, Insight

STEM Center Engineering Equipment

WAF donates $100,000 to create new UWGB engineering scholarship fund to assist Manitowoc county high school graduates

Released Jan. 15, 2021 from Cole Buergi, Leonard & Finco Public Relations

Manitowoc, Wis.—Manitowoc county high school graduates planning to attendUW-Green Bay, may have an opportunity for financial support through a new scholarship fund created by Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry (WAF), with support of the Schwartz family who has owned and operated the company since its founding in 1909.

WAF has donated $100,000 to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Foundation.

“We’re thrilled to help the next generation realize the opportunities available in the manufacturing industry,” said Berel Lutsky, WAF board member and a Professor of Arts at the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus. “The foundry’s success is due to the hard work and dedication of its team members, the community and surrounding area. This is an opportunity for us to invest in the future of our region.”

“This fund is an incredible opportunity for the Manitowoc area students; providing a scholarship source to help them earn engineering degrees at the university,” stated UWGB Chancellor Michael Alexander. “We’re grateful to Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry and the Schwartz family’s support as the university continues to grow and meet our area’s need for engineers.”

Manufacturing is a leading industry in Northeast Wisconsin and, as many within the workforce approach retirement, there is a shortage of new engineers to meet manufacturers’ needs. “As we look to the future, it’s important to prepare the next generation with the skills needed for companies such as ours to continue to flourish,” explains WAF CEO Sachin Shivaram. “It’s also a way for us to invest in the community and to show that there are great career opportunities right here in this region.”

Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship eligibility requirements:

  1. Recipients must be a graduate of a high school in Manitowoc county. These include:
    • Kiel High School
    • Lincoln High School
    • Manitowoc Lutheran
    • McKinley Academy
    • Mishicot High School
    • Reedsville High School
    • Roncalli High School
    • Two Rivers High School
    • Valders High School
  2. Recipients must major in either Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology.
  3. Must be admitted to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay as a degree-seeking undergraduate student.
  4. Must demonstrate financial need.
  5. Must be pursuing a major in mechanical engineering or mechanical engineering technology.
  6. Scholarship is renewable for up to three additional years.

For more information, or to apply for a scholarship, please visit: www.uwgb.edu/scholarships.

About Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry:

Founded in 1909, Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry is an industry leader in aluminum and copper-based alloy castings for a variety of industries. Headquartered in Manitowoc, Wis., the family-owned company is known for its All-American line of cookware and for its support of the local community. For more information, visit www.wafco.com.

Media Contacts:

Cole Buergi, Leonard & Finco Public Relations
(920) 619-4400
cbuergi@lfpublicrelations.com

Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry creates $100,000 scholarship fund | WLUK

MANITOWOC (WLUK) — A new scholarship aims to help Manitowoc County students aspiring to become engineers.The Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry (WAF), with support of the Schwartz family, has donated $100,000 to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Foundation. “We’re thrilled to help the next generation realize the opportunities available in the manufacturing industry,” said Berel Lutsky, WAF board member and a Professor of Arts at the UWGB-Manitowoc campus. “The foundry’s success is due to the hard work and dedication of its team members, the community and surrounding area. This is an opportunity for us to invest in the future of our region. ”To be eligible for this scholarship, recipients must be a graduate of a high school in Manitowoc County, must major in either Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology, must be admitted to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay as a degree-seeking undergraduate student and must demonstrate financial need.

Source: Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry creates $100,000 scholarship fund | WLUK

New WAF scholarship to help Manitowoc County aspiring engineers

A new scholarship aims to help Manitowoc County students aspiring to become engineers. The Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry (WAF), with support of the Schwartz family, has donated $100,000 to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Foundation. “We’re thrilled to help the next generation realize the opportunities available in the manufacturing industry,” said Berel Lutsky, WAF board member and a Professor of Arts at the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus.

“The foundry’s success is due to the hard work and dedication of its team members, the community and surrounding area. This is an opportunity for us to invest in the future of our region. ”To be eligible for this scholarship, recipients must be a graduate of a high school in Manitowoc County, must major in either Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology, must be admitted to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay as a degree-seeking undergraduate student and must demonstrate financial need.

Some Wisconsin STEM college students feel left behind by remote learning (Dean Katers quoted)

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) – The pandemic has disrupted the way students across all grade levels are learning.For some college students, they feel left behind and find this year as a lost cause.“Online education, in my opinion, is not as good as in person,” John Pfankuch, a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, said. “I feel like I’m not learning as much as I could be.”Pfankuch is studying mechanical engineering and his course load is heavy with courses in mathematics.

…Aaron Splan graduated from UWGB’s mechanical engineering program this winter and landed a job after an internship.

Splan agrees that distance learning is difficult for those majoring in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics also known as STEM.

“Staying with it and not falling behind is the biggest thing because it is more difficult than being in the classroom, at least for me personally it was more difficult,’ Splan said.

What helped him succeed was “just staying in constant contact” with professors, he said.

UWGB is taking steps to help struggling students, including having professors available remotely during their office hours.

Dean of the College of Science, Engineering, and Technology John Katers does not believe students should sit out a semester or a year waiting for the return of in-person classes.

“I believe things will be closer to normal for the fall [2021] semester and so we’re trying to make every effort as we can to make face to face,” Katers said.

He added that the school expects to offer more hybrid courses this spring.

Source: Some Wisconsin STEM college students feel left behind by remote learning