Faculty note: Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman publish article

Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman (Human Biology) recently published an article in ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. The article is titled, “Functionalized Iron Oxide–Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles for Protein Extraction from Complex Fluids.” This work demonstrates that the hybrid nanomaterials are much more efficient in extracting protein fractions from complex biological fluids in comparison to pure nanomaterials with applications in biotechnology. The article can be read here

UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosts 2020 Career Expo for local high school students

The UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosted its 2020 Career Expo on Jan. 8 for local high school students. Four hundred students were in attendance; 350 were freshmen from Manitowoc Lincoln High School and 50 were sophomores from Reedsville High School.

Faculty and staff led career-focused learning sessions. The Expo gave students the opportunity to learn about STEM opportunities and how to use high school classes and extracurricular experiences to prepare for college.

Associate Profs. Amy Kabrhel and James Kabrhel (chemistry) participated in a Cool Chemistry show. Prof. Rick Hein (biology) held a session on blood testing, and Associate Prof. Becky Abler (Biology) discussed bacteria. Lecturer Brian McLean and Assistant Prof. Bill Dirienzo (Physics) talked to the students about the fascinating study of physics, and Admissions Counselor Jennie Strohm held a session titled “High School Matters: Choosing Courses Wisely.” See below for photos of the event.

Commencement speaker, Prof. Patricia Terry, noted for ‘Iron-man worthy’ efforts on behalf of the University

Patricia TerryAs a tenured professor approaching her 25th year at UW-Green Bay, professor Patricia Terry describes herself as a “pinnacle person.” Which means, if you’re going to do something, take it all the way.

“If you’re going to run, run a marathon. Go to college? Get a Ph.D. Work at a university? Achieve the rank of full professor.”

She will bring her experience and wisdom to the stage on Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019 when she serves as the University’s commencement speaker.

Terry has done marathons one better by competing in Ironman triathlons—one of the world’s most difficult events—swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and then run a full marathon. “They fire the starting gun at 7 a.m. and you have until midnight to finish.” She’s completed three. (Also managing to squeeze in two Boston Marathons, two fifty-mile races, and more than 30 other marathons or ultra-marathons along the way).

Her career in academia began even sooner, when her father once offered his “exalted” (her description) advice to his eight-year-old daughter.

“I asked him, ‘who teaches college?’ He said ‘college professors.’ Then he added ‘If you became a college professor, you’d be one of the most honored, revered and respected members of society.’”

“I bring that up to him every chance I get.”

And while her CV is a testament to her scholarly work-ethic with dozens of peer-reviewed published papers, research grants and co-authorship of Principles of Chemical Separations with Environmental Applications, published by Cambridge University Press, it’s her collaboration with faculty and students that has brought her the greatest pleasure.

“What I’m most passionate about was starting the engineering program and leading my faculty, facilitating student success.”

Terry also discovered she had a knack for growing things—from wildflowers to academic flowers. In 2009, one of her students suggested, as a thesis project, replacing the under-performing grass roof over the Instructional Services building with native plants. The student never finished, but true to her pinnacle person personality, Terry persisted. Today, she solely supports a fund to hire students for maintenance and to purchase plants. Over the past seven years, she has gifted the fund approximately $15,000.

Ultimately, Terry’s most sustainable contribution to the University is her Ironman-worthy efforts to the success of students, faculty and the university. She was instrumental in helping launch the new bachelor of science programs in Electrical, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering Technology, becoming director of the programs in 2012.

As far as a “pinnacle” to her academic career to this point, it may be her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Resch School of Engineering. As the administrator overseeing the program, Terry helped set the curriculum and was in charge of faculty recruitment and mentoring, along with ensuring program accreditation.

Still, she remains a teacher of environmental engineering at heart. Or as she puts it—“Everything’s a chemical. We’re moving chemicals.” And as far as staying on the move goes, Terry confesses a general-education offering remains her favorite class to teach.

“I like teaching Energy and Society. I have to keep up with the news, that class changes every semester. It’s a moving content target.”

Story by Michael Shaw, Marketing and University Communication

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi publishes article

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, Natural and Applied Science) recently published an article titled “Multifunctional photo-physiochemical properties of tetronic 304 in aqueous phase: Mechanistic aspects of Au(III) reduction into Au(0)” in the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry. This work demonstrates the applications of star polymers for the synthesis of desired shape and size nanomaterials at an industrial scale.

Faculty note: Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi publication

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi  (Chemistry, NAS) recently published an article, “Applications of Molecular Structural Aspects of Gemini Surfactants in Reducing Nanoparticle–Nanoparticle Interactions,” in ACS high-impact journal “Langmuir.” This work highlights how to reduce nanomaterials inter-particle interactions and promote their applicability in diverse fields.

Fireball demo, Cool Chemistry, Sputnikfest 9/7/19

Photos: UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus faculty perform Cool Chemistry show at Sputnikfest

UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus Associate Prof. Amy Kabrhel (Chemistry), Assistant Prof. Breeyawn Lybbert (Chemistry) and Associate Prof. James Kabrhel (Chemistry) performed a Cool Chemistry show at Sputnikfest in Manitowoc on Saturday, Sept. 7. These ‘cool’ events give attendees the chance to experience explosions, color-changing solutions, solid foams, dry ice fog, fire and even more explosions.

Sputnikfest celebrates the moment a 20-pound piece of the Russian Sputnik IV landed in the middle of the street on the corner of N. 8th and Park in Manitowoc. Readers Digest labels Sputnikfest as one of the Top Five Funkiest Festivals in the country, and this funky festival has become a fun event for families region-wide.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.
Cool Chemistry, Sputnikfest 9/7/19

– Photos by James Kabrhel, Associate Professor (Chemistry), UW-Green Bay, Sheboygan Campus

Alumnus Reed Heintzkill gets first journal paper published

UW-Green Bay alumnus Reed Heintzkill (Chemistry) ’16 recently had his first-ever journal paper published in Surface Engineering. Heintzkill has recently started a Ph.D. program in Materials Science & Engineering at UW-Milwaukee, where he will focus on cement chemistry and nanotechnology in concrete applications. UW-Green Bay featured Heintzkill his senior year, describing his uncharacteristic path toward his college degree. He never fails to mention his appreciation of the faculty and staff members at UW-Green Bay who encouraged and mentored him.