Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi publishes article

Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) recently published an article in the “International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.” The article is titled, Photophysical behavior of heme group: Unfolding of hemoglobin and myoglobin in the presence of Gemini surfactants of different molecular architectures.” This work highlights the photophysical behavior of hemoglobin and myoglobin to predict their interactions with complex biological molecules.

UW-Green Bay’s Associate Prof. Debra Pearson feeds the world with knowledge | The COMM Voice

Students with the COMM Voice recently wrote a piece on and interviewed UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Debra Pearson (Chemistry) and how she travels across the world to educate women in the sciences. Read more here. Story by UW-Green Bay students Lorrigan Puls, Grace Merkt and Travis Boulanger.

Photo with graphic title picturing Senior Lecturer Nydia Villanueva preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the chemistry lab at UW-Green bay, as she gets ready to teach students in Principals of Chemistry II Lab at UW-Green Bay.

Video: Teaching Chemistry remotely, Nydia Villanueva

Here’s an example of teaching remotely. Senior lecturer Nydia Villanueva (NAS) preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the Chemistry Lab on the Green Bay Campus. Her students are taking Principals of Chemistry II Lab remotely.

Here she records the experiment and posts the video online.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Save the date: UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosts 18th annual ‘Cool Chemistry’ shows, April 30

Manitowoc, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus will be hosting two free Cool Chemistry shows on Thursday, April, 30, 2020 at the Manitowoc Campus University Theatre. The first show will begin at 4:30 p.m. for young scientists ages three to eight years old, followed by one at 6:30 p.m. for kids ages nine and up.

The Cool Chemistry shows feature explosions, color changing solutions, solid foams, dry ice fog, fire and even more explosions! Doors open 45 minutes prior to each show. Only 350 people will be admitted to each show. Each show runs 45-60 minutes. Families are asked to attend only one show. For a chance to be a volunteer participant, pick up a ticket at the door. Also, after each show, attendees will be able to make their own slime!

UW-Green Bay Manitowoc Campus Prof. Amy Kabrhel leads the show each year, now in its 18th year.

“This will be the 18th year for Cool Chemistry which began in 2003 as only one show with 100 attendees,” Kabrhel said. “It has expanded each year, eventually reaching a point where two shows were required to accommodate everyone that wanted to attend—now about 400 to 450 people each year between the two shows.

She says organizers try and change what night the show is offered so that families with particular obligations can attend every few years. For more information, please contact Amy Kabrhel at kabrhela@uwgb.edu or 920-683-2746.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus has served the lakeshore of eastern Wisconsin for more than 50 years, helping generations of students to start their path toward a bachelor’s degree. Nestled on 40 acres along the breathtaking Lake Michigan shoreline, the Manitowoc Campus offers hands-on instruction from internationally respected professors and a start on more than 200 academic programs within the UW System. Community members enjoy concerts and lectures, attend art and theater performances and cheer for their favorite athletic teams. The campus and community celebrated the opening of a $7-million renovation project in February 2018 featuring state-of-the-art updates to the library, a new science commons and renovations to art studios, science labs and classrooms.

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Faculty note: Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman publish article

Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman (Human Biology) recently published an article in ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. The article is titled, “Functionalized Iron Oxide–Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles for Protein Extraction from Complex Fluids.” This work demonstrates that the hybrid nanomaterials are much more efficient in extracting protein fractions from complex biological fluids in comparison to pure nanomaterials with applications in biotechnology. The article can be read here

UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosts 2020 Career Expo for local high school students

The UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus hosted its 2020 Career Expo on Jan. 8 for local high school students. Four hundred students were in attendance; 350 were freshmen from Manitowoc Lincoln High School and 50 were sophomores from Reedsville High School.

Faculty and staff led career-focused learning sessions. The Expo gave students the opportunity to learn about STEM opportunities and how to use high school classes and extracurricular experiences to prepare for college.

Associate Profs. Amy Kabrhel and James Kabrhel (chemistry) participated in a Cool Chemistry show. Prof. Rick Hein (biology) held a session on blood testing, and Associate Prof. Becky Abler (Biology) discussed bacteria. Lecturer Brian McLean and Assistant Prof. Bill Dirienzo (Physics) talked to the students about the fascinating study of physics, and Admissions Counselor Jennie Strohm held a session titled “High School Matters: Choosing Courses Wisely.” See below for photos of the event.

Commencement speaker, Prof. Patricia Terry, noted for ‘Iron-man worthy’ efforts on behalf of the University

Patricia TerryAs a tenured professor approaching her 25th year at UW-Green Bay, professor Patricia Terry describes herself as a “pinnacle person.” Which means, if you’re going to do something, take it all the way.

“If you’re going to run, run a marathon. Go to college? Get a Ph.D. Work at a university? Achieve the rank of full professor.”

She will bring her experience and wisdom to the stage on Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019 when she serves as the University’s commencement speaker.

Terry has done marathons one better by competing in Ironman triathlons—one of the world’s most difficult events—swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and then run a full marathon. “They fire the starting gun at 7 a.m. and you have until midnight to finish.” She’s completed three. (Also managing to squeeze in two Boston Marathons, two fifty-mile races, and more than 30 other marathons or ultra-marathons along the way).

Her career in academia began even sooner, when her father once offered his “exalted” (her description) advice to his eight-year-old daughter.

“I asked him, ‘who teaches college?’ He said ‘college professors.’ Then he added ‘If you became a college professor, you’d be one of the most honored, revered and respected members of society.’”

“I bring that up to him every chance I get.”

And while her CV is a testament to her scholarly work-ethic with dozens of peer-reviewed published papers, research grants and co-authorship of Principles of Chemical Separations with Environmental Applications, published by Cambridge University Press, it’s her collaboration with faculty and students that has brought her the greatest pleasure.

“What I’m most passionate about was starting the engineering program and leading my faculty, facilitating student success.”

Terry also discovered she had a knack for growing things—from wildflowers to academic flowers. In 2009, one of her students suggested, as a thesis project, replacing the under-performing grass roof over the Instructional Services building with native plants. The student never finished, but true to her pinnacle person personality, Terry persisted. Today, she solely supports a fund to hire students for maintenance and to purchase plants. Over the past seven years, she has gifted the fund approximately $15,000.

Ultimately, Terry’s most sustainable contribution to the University is her Ironman-worthy efforts to the success of students, faculty and the university. She was instrumental in helping launch the new bachelor of science programs in Electrical, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering Technology, becoming director of the programs in 2012.

As far as a “pinnacle” to her academic career to this point, it may be her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Resch School of Engineering. As the administrator overseeing the program, Terry helped set the curriculum and was in charge of faculty recruitment and mentoring, along with ensuring program accreditation.

Still, she remains a teacher of environmental engineering at heart. Or as she puts it—“Everything’s a chemical. We’re moving chemicals.” And as far as staying on the move goes, Terry confesses a general-education offering remains her favorite class to teach.

“I like teaching Energy and Society. I have to keep up with the news, that class changes every semester. It’s a moving content target.”

Story by Michael Shaw, Marketing and University Communication

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi publishes article

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, Natural and Applied Science) recently published an article titled “Multifunctional photo-physiochemical properties of tetronic 304 in aqueous phase: Mechanistic aspects of Au(III) reduction into Au(0)” in the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry. This work demonstrates the applications of star polymers for the synthesis of desired shape and size nanomaterials at an industrial scale.