Tag: publication

Faculty note: Luczaj article


Geoscience Prof. John Luczaj (Natural and Applied Sciences) is a co-author on an article published recently in the journal Resources. The article evaluates the changes to groundwater quality in Northeastern Wisconsin that resulted from the 2007 Karst Task Force report and subsequent regulatory changes in certain counties. Lead author Kevin Erb is a graduate of UWGB’s Environmental Science and Policy graduate program.

Faculty note: Grubisha publication

Lisa Grubisha, Assistant Professor of Biology in the Department of Natural and Applied Sciences, has published the paper “Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs” in the September issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(17): 5889-5899 (http://aem.asm.org/content/81/17/5889.full ).

Faculty note: Christine Smith


Associate Prof. of Psychology Christine Smith of the Human Development and Women’s and Gender Studies programs is co-author of a book chapter titled “Medicalizing women’s weight: Bariatric surgery and weight-loss drugs” with Julie Konik, Ph.D., of University of Wisconsin College-Sheboygan. The chapter is published in the book The Wrong Prescription for Women: How Medicine and Media Create a ‘Need’ for Treatment, Drugs, and Surgery.

Faculty note: 
Heidi Sherman

Heidi Sherman of Humanistic Studies has published “The Tooth Blades of Medieval Novgorod,” in K. Grömer and F. Pritchard (eds.) 2015: Aspects of the Design, Production and Use of Textiles and Clothing from the Bronze Age to the Early Modern Era. She presented her research The North European Symposium for Archaeological Textiles in May 2014 in Hallstatt, Austria, and the Archaeolingua Main Series 33. Budapest 2015.

Faculty note: Busy stretch for Kaye


UW-Green Bay Prof. of Democracy and Justice Studies Harvey J. Kaye has been busy lately, with online essays and a series of broadcast interviews, including:
A piece in honor of the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II
A Lesson in American History with Professor Harvey J. Kaye on KKRN radio

Faculty note: Dalke and Hunt presentation on mustangs vs domestics


Karen Dalke, lecturer in Public and Environmental Affairs recently presented a co-authored article with Megan Olson Hunt, assistant professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, titled “Mustangs and Domestic Horses: Examining What We Think We Know About Differences.” The presentation was made at the International Society for Anthro-zoology in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Using the United States Geographical Survey (USGS) ethogram for Free-Roaming Feral Horses, this study examines behaviors of Bureau of Land Management mustangs and domestic horses. Over 26,000 behavioral images were analyzed and sorted into 15 categories. Continuous focal sampling at one-minute intervals captured behaviors for six equids over a one-month period. Results suggest that over time, mustangs behave similarly to fully domesticated horses, indicating that adoption is a feasible option for America’s thousands of wild mustangs.


Faculty note: Currier publication on magmatic mechanics


Assistant Prof. Ryan Currier of Natural and Applied Sciences has received word his paper will be published in the September 2015 issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. The paper “Mapping real time growth of experimental laccoliths: The effect of solidification on the mechanics of magmatic intrusion” is the first publication based on experiments performed at UWGB, some with students. The main driver of this research is that magma chambers form inside the crust, and are not typically directly observed. Even the old, cold magma chambers that are now exposed at the surface are difficult to study in full. In Currier’s experiments, he created scaled-down magmatic intrusions (using molten wax as magma and gelatin as crust) to observe how magma chambers grow through time. The results could be helpful in developing new field studies of ancient magma chambers.

Faculty note: Aldrete publication


History Prof. Gregory S. Aldrete of Humanistic Studies had an article published in the August issue of the Spanish journal Desperta Ferro: Arqueología & Historia. It is a special issue on the lower classes of ancient Rome, with articles from scholars in France, Spain, England, and the United States. Aldrete’s article is titled “La voz del pueblo. Clases bajas y violencia políticamente motivada,” which translates as, “The Voice of the People: The Lower Classes and Politically Motivated Violence.”

Faculty note: Warner publication

Associate Prof. Lora Warner of Public and Environmental Affairs is the author of the article “Catalytic Funding, Partnership, Evaluation, and Advocacy: Innovation Strategies for Community Impact,” published in The Foundation Review: Vol. 7: Iss. 2, (Article 8). You can read a summary at the journal archive.

 

Prof. Austin quoted in International Business piece on Walker, tenure


Andrew Austin, an associate professor and chair of Democracy and Justice Studies at UW-Green Bay, is quoted at the end of an International Business Times article about Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal to move academic tenure from state statutes to Board of Regents control. Headlined “Scott Walker Tenure Controversy,” the article quotes a range of observers including faculty members worried about new language that would allow for the release of tenured professors when it is “deemed necessary due to a budget or program decision requiring program discontinuance, curtailment, modification or redirection.” Austin’s quote: 
“Tenure protections set in law tell the rest of the country that Wisconsin is committed to upholding academic freedom and sees tenure as a crucial asset in attracting the best professionals around the world and keeping them here in Wisconsin. Why shouldn’t we be a model for the nation? The state is already losing some of its finest faculty, which means an exodus of research moneys from the state. It will lose a great deal more if tenure protections are removed or weakened. If economic and social developments are valuable things to Wisconsinites, then retention of strong tenure language is essential.” To read the full article.