Tag: Black History Month

Photo: Lawton Gallery’s satellite exhibit celebrates Black History

An exhibit calling attention to Black History Month has been installed in the display case in the concourse-level corridor linking the Cofrin Library and the IS Building. The display, courtesy of the Office of the Curator of Art, features examples of African and African-American art along with poster art celebrating the contributions of civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks. http://news.uwgb.edu/log-news/news/02/02/black-history-month-exhibit/
 

Get your tickets: Soul Food Dinner is Feb. 7

Here’s a friendly reminder that UW-Green Bay’s annual Soul Food Dinner is just around the corner. Sponsored by the Black Student Union and the American Intercultural Center, the Saturday, Feb. 7 event promises a scrumptious selection of Deep South eats along with great entertainment from renowned slam poet Dana Gilmore. “The Soul Food Dinner is a time when we can all come together and share in the festivities of great food and camaraderie from all,” said Diversity Director Justin Mallett. “A joyous occasion enjoyed by everyone, the Soul Food Dinner also will serve as the kick-off event to Black History Month at UW-Green Bay.” Doors open at 5 p.m. for the event, with the program set to start at 5:30.

UW-Green Bay presents annual Soul Food Dinner Feb. 7

The UW-Green Bay Black Student Union, along with the University’s American Intercultural Center, will host their annual Soul Food Dinner Saturday, Feb. 7 in the Phoenix Room of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the program begins at 5:30.

The evening’s program will feature nationally renowned slam poet Dana Gilmore, along with other speakers and entertainers to help celebrate the festive event. Dinner menu items include fried chicken, catfish, macaroni and cheese, collard greens, candied yams, cornbread dressing and peach cobbler. The dishes have a true southern flavor and come from the Deep South kitchen of UW-Green Bay Diversity Director Justin Mallett’s family.

“The Soul Food Dinner is a time when we can all come together and share in the festivities of great food and camaraderie from all,” Mallett said. “A joyous occasion enjoyed by everyone, the Soul Food Dinner also will serve as the kick-off event to Black History Month at UW-Green Bay.”

Tickets for the Soul Food Dinner are $3 for students and children under age 12, and $6 for non-students. They can be purchased at the University Ticketing and Information Center in the University Union, or by calling (920) 465-2400.

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In the news: Carol Moseley Braun visit

Former U.S. Sen. Carol Moseley Braun told a good-size crowd at UW-Green Bay Monday night that it never occurred to her that her race or gender could impact her achievements. Moseley Braun, the first African-American woman to serve in the Senate, visited campus for Black History Month and Women’s History Month observances. See more.

Women’s History Month begins early at UW-Green Bay, with Moseley Braun

A full slate of Women’s History Month events kicks off a bit early here on campus, as UW-Green Bay will welcome former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun for a Monday (Feb. 25) address. Moseley Braun, the first African-American woman elected to the upper chamber and a former candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, will speak on women in leadership at 5 p.m. in the Phoenix Room. The event is part of the University’s Black History Month and Women’s History Month celebrations. The news release below offers a full list of events coming up in March, along with more specifics on Moseley Braun’s visit. Mark your calendars.
 

Moseley Braun to deliver Feb. 25 address on women in leadership at UW-Green Bay

Former U.S. Senator and past candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination Carol Moseley Braun will speak on the topic of women in leadership Monday, Feb. 25 at UW-Green Bay.

Moseley Braun’s address, “One person, just like you,” is slated to begin at 5 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. There will be a question-and-answer session at approximately 6:15, and the talk will wrap up by 7 p.m. The event, part of UW-Green Bay’s Black History Month and Women’s History Month celebrations, is free and open to the public.

Moseley Braun was elected to the Senate in 1992, the first African-American woman ever to serve in the nation’s upper chamber. She campaigned for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2003, and also has served as Illinois State Representative, United States Attorney and Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa.

In addition to her public address, Moseley Braun’s time at UW-Green Bay will include meeting with a Multicultural Counseling class. More information about Women’s History Month at UW-Green Bay is available online: http://news.uwgb.edu/log-news/releases/02/18/womens-history-month-events-1326/.

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Black History Month concludes with Wednesday panel discussion

Black History Month will conclude on Wednesday (Feb. 29) with a 4 to 5 p.m. panel  discussion in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Panelists will offer their reflections on the UW-Green Bay program and the month in general, and the audience will be invited to participate in this discussion. Panelists are as follows: Christine Smith, James Coates, Peter Kellogg, Tohoro Akakpo, Celestine Jeffreys and David Turney. In case you missed it, here’s a link to the video from the month’s keynote event, a Feb. 15 address from original Freedom Rider Hank Thomas.
 

New video offers highlights from Freedom Rider event

Original Freedom Rider Hank Thomas moved a capacity UW-Green Bay crowd Feb. 15, delivering a stirring Historical Perspectives Lecture Series talk that also served as the keynote address for Black History Month on campus. New video has reflections on Thomas’ past and hopes for our collective future.

History of a journey: Civil rights pioneer shares moving message

Video: Freedom Rider Hank ThomasA civil rights pioneer moved a UW-Green Bay audience with his message of challenge and hope Feb. 15, as he spoke about facing prison and death as a young man determined to make a difference.

But Hank Thomas, one of the original Freedom Riders, also spoke of hope for the future, the promise of reconciliation — and the kind of steely resolve that’s kept him fighting for justice and equality for more than 50 years.

“When I first got on the bus, I had no idea of the kind of danger that we would be in,” Thomas said. “… I thought it would be simply an extension of what I was doing in terms of sitting in. I had no idea of the kind of violence that would occur.”

Yet Thomas would face that violence — and imprisonment — again and again. The integrated bus he rode into the Deep South would be firebombed. He would be beaten, threatened and placed in solitary confinement for taking a stand.

“People were asking me, ‘haven’t you had enough? Are you crazy?’ ” Thomas said. “I said, ‘no I’ve got to see this thing through.’ ”

See it through he did, Thomas told the UW-Green Bay audience, many of whom were moved to tears by his address. One of just four of the original 13 Freedom Riders who are still living, Thomas last year celebrated five decades since the groundbreaking rides — and the progress that’s been made. He also reflected on what still needs to be done.

“We all are aware, of course, of what has happened, and how the country has changed,” he said. “But one of the areas that I’d like to see greater change (in) is the relationships between blacks and whites, whether it’s in the South or the North. When we went back last year for the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Ride, we called it a journey of reconciliation.”

That reconciliation needs to happen not just in the South, but everywhere, Thomas said. Frustration and anger may accompany the journey, but it will be worth it in the end.

“People ask me, do ever I get angry?” Thomas said. “Yes, I do. I do get angry about what happened. But I was able to re-channel that anger. Living well is always the best revenge.”

Click here to also see a photo gallery from the Feb. 15 event.