UW-Green Bay Goes Big With Campus Composter | Wisconsin Public Radio

Students at UW-Green Bay now have the option to compost food waste rather than send it to a landfill. WPR talks with a student leader about how the project came about, and how it’s working so far. Host: Rob FerrettGuest(s): Guillermo Gomez

Source: UW-Green Bay Goes Big With Campus Composter | Wisconsin Public Radio

Reminder: Beyond Sustainability: Imagining an Ecological Future is Tonight!

Tonight, Nov. 30 from 6 to 7 p.m, join Prof. David Voelker (Humanities and History) in an honest conversation about sustainability—not to demolish the concept, but to recognize that it has fallen short in helping change our unsustainable ways. This event is part of the Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series and a Common CAHSS event.

Join the event here.

Common CAHSS keynote is Nov. 30

November 30, 2020 from 6 to 7 p.m. Prof. David Voelker (Humanities, History) leads the discussion, Beyond Sustainability; Imagining an Ecological Future. Here’s a description:

“It’s time for an honest conversation about sustainability—not to demolish the concept, but to recognize that it has fallen short in helping us change our unsustainable ways. Although the dominant models of sustainability in theory recognize that environmental problems are entangled with economic and social justice issues, in practice sustainability efforts have tended to focus rather narrowly on what we usually call “the environmental impact” of our activities. We have thus failed to transcend not only the polluting energy systems of the past two centuries but also the economic and ideological systems that see unlimited growth as the only viable option. Unsustainability is not simply a technical problem that can be solved through technological means. To mitigate the multiple environmental crises into which we are rushing, we need to reconsider our roles on this living planet as human beings. Can we imagine an ecological future in which we thrive as members of the larger community of life?”  See more on the Common CAHSS page.

UW-Green Bay offers Sustainability Certificate Program

Program Aims to Meet the Needs of the Present Without Compromising Future Generations

GREEN BAY, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is launching a new noncredit Sustainability Certificate Program in January 2021. The goal of the certificate program is to educate business professionals to implement sustainable decisions into their everyday roles to make a positive impact on both their organization as well as the world around them.

The certificate program consists of four flexible and 100% online courses, which can be completed in less than seven months. On completion, participants will receive an exclusive UW-Green Bay digital badge. For optimal learning, participants should expect to commit 2-3 hours per week to the coursework.

Each course is six weeks long and focuses on a facet of sustainability, including environmental, organizational behavior, and economics and society. The final requirement is a capstone course, which incorporates course concepts and requires participants to address a sustainability issue or idea in their business, nonprofit, government or community setting by creating an action plan.

  • Environmental Sustainability January 11 – February 19, 2021
  • Sustainable Business March 1 – April 9, 2021
  • Economics in Society and Sustainability April 19 – May 28, 2021
  • Capstone – Sustainability and Business June 7 July 16, 2021

Sustainability instructors include John Arendt, Director of Environmental Management and Business Institute at UW-Green Bay, Tara Reed, Associate Professor, Department of Natural and Applied Sciences at UW-Green Bay and Matthew Winden, Associate Professor of Economics and Assistant Director of the Fiscal & Economic Research Center at UW-Whitewater.

“Developing an understanding of the benefits and barriers is critical to advancing any sustainability project,” says Professor Arendt. “The capstone course will guide the student-designed sustainability project from inception to consideration to implementation over the six-week course length.”

The certificate program is being created and facilitated by UW-Green Bay’s Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement. For more information on the certificate program, please visit www.uwgb.edu/sustainability-certificate/ or contact Melissa Betke, Program Specialist, at betkem@uwgb.edu. 

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to more than 8,700 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

About UW-Green Bay’s Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement
The Division of Continuing Education and Community Engagement focuses its mission on creating educational opportunity and access for all ages, encompassing K-12 student programs, personal and professional development and customized training to meet the needs of a progressive economy. The division develops, collaborates and executes responsive solutions for diverse communities statewide, all of which reflect a deep commitment to inclusion, social justice and civic responsibility

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Vintage photo of an environmental awareness demonstration political activist ralley circa 1970.

Echos of Eco U—More on the newly formed Office of Sustainability

Portrait photograph of John Arendt
John Arendt

UW-Green Bay has created its first Office of Sustainability and has named John Arendt as director. Last year, working with then Provost and now current Chancellor Alexander, the campus Sustainability Committee identified the need for a dedicated office. Its mission? To address the campus’s sustainability needs and to serve as a conduit between the campus and UW System sustainability representatives.

Arendt sees many similarities between today’s climate and the ‘turbulent 60’s’. “In many respects, the conditions we are operating under seem eerily similar to the planetary crisis going on when the University was founded.” He also envisions the office taking an activist role for the University and the region. “Including a need for new thinking, teachers looking for novel ways to instruct and looking to a younger generation to provide leadership out of the current paradigm.”

One of those current needs will be reporting the campus sustainability efforts to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) report, which is due in spring 2021. Surveys consistently show that sustainability practices remain extremely important for students when considering which college to attend.

The STARS report communicates the university’s sustainability rating to prospective college students in publications such as Princeton Review and Sierra Club’s Cool Schools report. The Office of Sustainability will be housed in the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), where Arendt will also continue to serve as director. The EMBI office is located in ES 105 and Arendt can be reached via email arendtjo@uwgb.edu or on the contact page of the campus sustainability webpage.

 

 

UW-Green Bay opens the Office of Sustainability

UW-Green Bay has created its first Office of Sustainability and has named John Arendt as its director. Last year, working with then provost and now current Chancellor Mike Alexander, the campus Sustainability Committee identified the need for a dedicated office and staff person in order to address the campus’s sustainability needs and to serve as a conduit between the campus and UW System sustainability representatives. One of those current needs will be reporting the campus sustainability efforts to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) report, which is due in spring 2021. The STARS report communicates the University’s sustainability rating to prospective college students in publications such as the Princeton Review and the Sierra Club’s Cool Schools report. The Office of Sustainability will be will be housed in the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI), where John Arendt will also continue to serve as director. The EMBI office is located in ES 105 and John Arendt can be reached via email or on the contact page of the campus sustainability webpage.

Reminder: Part Two of Our Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series

Reminder, part two of the Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series is Thursday, Oct. 22, from 4 to 5 p.m. streamed live here. In this week’s installation, the Civil Rights Movement Meets the Environmental Movement (with Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat). More in the press release.

Image In Pursuit of Balance

Now offered: a new Sustainability Certificate Program

Registration is now open for a new noncredit Sustainability Certificate Program. Classes begin in January, encompassing environment, business, public policy and action. Help close the knowing. vs. doing gap. Organizations have great intentions and consumers are demanding sustainability—ecological, social and economic. Organizations seek employees with a sustainability mindset, who can think big, and help close the compliance vs. competitive advantage gap. The four classes are 100% online and accelerated, lasting six weeks each. The certificate program can be completed in under seven months. For optimal learning, expect a time commitment of approximately 2-3 hours per week. See more and register.

 

A large crane installs An Intermodal Earth Flow composting steel vessel outside the University Union delivery area.

Photos: Earth Flow Composter Installed

It’s a student-funded project that has been in the works for awhile—an Intermodal Earth Flow composting steel vessel was installed outside the University Union delivery area, recently. The composter will handle organic food waste from the University Dining, as well as food waste from plates, and dining operations on the UW-Green Bay Campus. The post-mix will be taken to a site on-campus to cure for between 2-4 months which will then yield compost that can be used. The composter has a minimum processing capacity of At least 2,000 pounds of raw organic waste per 7-day period or 660 gallons.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Earth Flow Composter Installed

– Photos by Grant Winslow

 

Virtual program: New Common CAHSS episode

You can view the September talk of the 2020 Common CAHSS: Beyond Sustainability Speaker Series via CAHSSeffect.org. Common CAHSS is a set of programing tied to a particular theme and brought to you by the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (CAHSS, pronounced “cause”) at UW-Green Bay. The 2020 theme is Beyond Sustainability and Prof. Staudinger’s Sept. 24, 2020 talk was titled Making Good Choices: Thinking about Ethics Beyond Sustainability. Prof. David Voelker, the co-chair of Common CAHSS, provided an introduction to the talk and this year’s theme.

Staudinger (Democracy and Justice Studies) explored the difficulty of ethical action in the face of multiple crises, drawing on the work of Alexis Shotwell whose book Against Purity: Living Ethically in Compromised Times, argues that alongside the temptation to give up on ethics altogether is a desire to remove ourselves utterly from messy, complex systems through completely pure action.

Making Good Choices: Thinking about Ethics Beyond Sustainability (Dr. Alison Staudinger)