Visitors peer into the large fish tank to see the yellow peach during The Farmory grand opening of the perch fish hatchery in Green Bay.

Photos: The Farmory Perch Fish Hatchery Opens

The Farmory celebrated its launch of the state-of-the-art yellow perch fish hatchery in Green Bay on Feb. 10, 2020. The nonprofit hatchery is an indoor urban farm that focuses on aquaponics and aquaculture. The startup hatchery launched with assistance from its educational partners at UW-Green Bay. CSET Dean John Katers was one of the speakers at the ribbon-cutting event. Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr. WFRV has a report.

The Farmory Perch Fish Hatchery Opens

– Photos by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Dean Katers will help The Farmory launch state-of-the art fish hatchery at ribbon-cutting, Feb. 10

On Feb. 10, 2020 at 3:30 p.m. at 437 S. Jackson St., Green Bay at the NeighborWorks Green Bay offices, the Farmory will host a ribbon cutting celebration to launch a state-of-the-art yellow perch fish hatchery. It is free and open to the public. UW-Green Bay’s Dean John Katers (CSET) will be among those giving remarks. The gathering begins at 3:30 p.m., with remarks beginning at 3:45 p.m. and media interviews to follow. The hatchery is a step toward helping revive this one-time staple of the Great Lakes and helping our region become an industry leader in fresh-water aquaculture.

The Farmory is also celebrating the 100th anniversary of its building, which was originally opened as the Allouez Mineral Springs water bottling plant in March of 1920, and later became the Armory, which housed the Army National Guard. After 40 years of vacancy, a group of visionary community leaders gathered financial and in-kind support to bring the concept of an urban farm to reality.

The Farmory is a 501(c)3 nonprofit indoor urban farm with a social mission. The farm focuses on aquaponics and aquaculture and provides the fuel for our programming objectives which provide learning opportunities in sustainable agriculture that build economic self-sufficiency, improve health, well-being and the environment. The hatchery has been launched with assistance from our educational partners at UW-Green Bay. We welcome community members to join us in celebration.

 

 

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff toured Manitowoc businesses

On Friday, Jan. 24, 2020, UW-Green Bay faculty and staff from Green Bay and Manitowoc campuses toured the Farm Wisconsin Discovery Center, Grotogut Family Farm and DTE Biomass plant in Manitowoc to discuss educational partnership opportunities.

The attendees were:

  • Mike Draney, Chair of Natural and Applied Sciences
  • Mike Holly, Environmental Engineering
  • John Luczaj, Geoscience and Water Science
  • Patricia Terry, Chair of the School of Engineering
  • Heather Masters, Director of Dietetics Internship Program
  • Tony Werner, Director of Advancement
  • Mike Alexander, Provost
  • John Katers, Dean of CSET
  • Rachele Bakic, Campus Executive Officer, Manitowoc Campus
  • Becky Abler, Natural and Applied Sciences
  • Rick Hein, Natural and Applied Sciences

  

Faculty note: Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman publish article

Assistant Profs. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) and Georgette Moyle-Heyrman (Human Biology) recently published an article in ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. The article is titled, “Functionalized Iron Oxide–Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles for Protein Extraction from Complex Fluids.” This work demonstrates that the hybrid nanomaterials are much more efficient in extracting protein fractions from complex biological fluids in comparison to pure nanomaterials with applications in biotechnology. The article can be read here

UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris honored by Wisconsin Academy | Coastal News Today

“The Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters announced on Jan. 14, 2020, the seven recipients of the 2020 Academy Fellows Award. Among them was UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris (NAS), who has dedicated his career and life’s work to scientific solutions to Great Lakes issues.” More via WI – UW-Green Bay Professor Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris honored by Wisconsin Academy | Coastal News Today.

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus Assistant Prof. hosts public talk on Jan. 22 | The Daily News

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus’s Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) hosted a public lecture on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 on the relationship between water quality and neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimers and Parkinson’s disease. More via Bay hosts public lecture on Wednesday | The Daily News.

UW-Green Bay, Marinette Assistant Prof. selected to attend residency | The Daily Press

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Renee Richer (Natural and Applied Sciences) has been selected to attend fully funded residency held at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Chevy Chase, Md. The seminar will focus on how faculty can develop a more equity-based mindset and educational experience for students. Read more via Renee Richer selelcted to attend residency | The Daily Press. 

UW-Green Bay Professor Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris honored by Wisconsin Academy

The Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters announced on Jan. 14, 2020, the seven recipients of the 2020 Academy Fellows Award. Among them was UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Hallet J. ‘Bud’ Harris (NAS), who has dedicated his career and life’s work to scientific solutions to Great Lakes issues.

“His research and advocacy laid the foundation for ecological restoration efforts that are among the most ambitious in the world,” according to his nominators. “His contributions to science and the people of Wisconsin hardly stopped in 1999, however. To this day, he is an effective leader in efforts to improve environmental quality and sustainable resource use in Wisconsin. His contributions range from front-line leadership in water quality issues to meaningful influence on discussions of climate change, environmental economics, and science education. His career as a scientist and leader is approaching 50 years, with no sign of retreat.”

Hallet 'Bud' Harris
Hallet ‘Bud’ Harris

Noteworthy is Harris’s significant publication record, but his major contributions to water science, according to colleagues, are manifest through well-documented influence on public policy. Outcomes of his work, chronicled prominently by reports, research documents, and on-the-ground actions, have led to precedent-setting investments in water quality abatements totaling more than a billion dollars and counting.

At UW-Green Bay, Harris taught undergraduate ecology and graduate courses in wetland ecology and ecosystem management. He and his students carried out research in coastal wetlands of Green Bay as part of the Wisconsin Sea Grant Green Bay Subprogram which he coordinated for eight years. Subsequently he served as “on site coordinator” of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) PCB Mass Balance Study. In that role, Harris laid the foundation for a PCB cleanup effort in the Fox River—said to be the largest fresh water clean-up in the world—resulting in the removal of 2.4 million tons of contaminated sediments. Harris also led consequential efforts to address nonpoint source pollution of sediments and nutrients, a second complex problem in the Fox River/Lower Green Bay ecosystem.

Serving on all three steering committees (Technical, Ad-hoc Science, and Outreach), he was instrumental in precipitating USEPA and Wisconsin DNR actions to develop total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulations for controlling runoff of phosphorous and suspended solids in the Lower Fox River Basin. During this process, he also obtained nearly $1 million in funding to engage high school students and teachers in a successful stream monitoring and education program in the Fox River Watershed. Among many other professional contributions, he currently serves as member and past chair for the Sea Grant Advisory Council, he is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Wisconsin Initiative for Climate Change Impacts (WICCI), and he is a long-serving leader of the Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance Advisory Board.

“The list of Dr. Harris’s leadership roles is truly remarkable, reflecting a passion for applying science to critical ecological and sociological challenges,” say his nominators. “He has contributed significantly to the peer-reviewed scientific literature and he has inspired and mentored hundreds of students. His most important legacy, however, will likely be the public policies and conservation actions that have happened because of his passionate commitment as an applied scientist and community leader.”

After receiving a bachelor of science from Coe College, he graduated with a master’s and Ph.D. from Iowa State University and joined UW–Green Bay in 1969, retiring in 1999. Harris presently serves in a science advisory capacity for four environmental organizations.

Megafarms and pollution: Future of dairy is tested in Brown County

“Brown County, home to Wisconsin’s third-largest city, may seem an unlikely testing ground for the future of dairy farming. The lower Fox River runs through the middle of the county — a watershed with some of the most intensive manufacturing in the state.” …“I do think that it is a major concern for the system,” said Kevin Fermanich of UW-Green Bay, who studies the effects of land practices on the bay.

“Do we have enough land that is appropriate for … applying the manure being created by all of these dairy cows?”

See more via Megafarms and pollution: Future of dairy is tested in Brown County.