Campus mourns the loss of Professor Emeritus Tian You Hu

UW-Green Bay mourns the loss of UW-Green Bay Professor Emeritus Tian You Hu. He passed away on Friday, May 22, 2020 after a battle with COVID-19. He was a Mathematics professor and served as former chair of the program. He retired from Natural and Applied Sciences in 2016 after 25 years of dedication and service to UW-Green Bay.

His daughter, Lori Hu, sent an update regarding his passing, memorial service and scholarship fund in his name:

“Dr. Tian You Hu, a loving father and husband, passed peacefully from this world on May 22, 2020 after a brave, month-long battle with COVID-19.  He was 71.

Prof. Emeritus Tian You Hu

Tian was born on Jan 23, 1949 in Enping, China. Following the Cultural Revolution in China, he studied at Zhongshan University and then completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pittsburgh. Tian was a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for over 25 years, from 1990 to his retirement in 2016. He was a lifelong scholar, read widely and was actively writing research papers up until his illness.

Tian was a simple man, and embodied gratitude and wisdom. He did not care for things like money or power, but treated everyone with respect regardless of their status in life and gave without expecting anything in return. He let things go, forgave easily and looked outward at life. He found great joy and honor in fatherhood, and made every sacrifice to give his children a better life. Like all immigrants, he survived grueling physical and mental challenges to come to the U.S. and provide for his family, and achieved a life beyond his wildest dreams.

He is reunited with his father, Hu Jie Yu; mother, Zheng Feng Chun; and elder brother, Hu Tian Xi. He is survived and missed by his wife of 37 years, Bao Qin He; eldest daughter, Lori Hu; and youngest son, Alex Hu.

In his memory, the Dr. Tian You Hu Memorial Endowed Scholarship has been established to support aspiring students at UW-Green Bay.”

Online donations can be made to the GoFundMe account, https://www.gofundme.com/f/dr-tian-you-hu-memorial-scholarship. Tax-deductible donations can be made with a check payable to:

UW-Green Bay Foundation
2420 Nicolet Drive
Cofrin Library Suite 805
Green Bay, WI 54311-7001

Please note the Dr. Tian You Hu Memorial Endowed Scholarship

Send online condolences through Facebook.

A memorial service will be held over Zoom on Thursday May 28, 2020 for family, friends and colleagues to share their memories. Immediate family will be present at Proko-Wall Funeral Home, 1630 E. Mason St, Green Bay, WI 54302.

Meeting ID: 858 1910 8325

Password: 7UR38K

  • Chinese portion: 10 a.m. Central Time / 11 p.m. China Time
  • English portion: 1 p.m. Central Time

 

Mini Heirloom Plant Sale, May 20

We know how much you are missing the plant sale, and we have a surprise! Volunteer Dorothy Summers grew over 500 tomato and pepper plants in her brand new greenhouse and will be selling them at Stone Silo Prairie Nursery on Wednesday, May 20 from 12 to 5 p.m., or until they sell-out.

There are lots of favorites available for our hard-core fans. Please come out and visit Vicki and Dorothy from a socially safe distance, of course.

We will be outside and will be selling contact-free. CASH ONLY and BRING YOUR OWN CONTAINERS. All money goes into the NAS Heirloom Plant Sale Fund.

We usually raise enough money to support 8-12 research projects and internships each year. This year we hope to raise $1,000 to support at least one scholarship.

While we will not have flowers, you can select from a wide selection of beautiful native perennials for your flower gardens from Stone Silo while you are there.
But that’s not all! Associate Prof. Steve Meyer (NAS) will be there with his world famous Heirloom Salsas. All salsa sales support the Scholarship.
Stone Silo Prairie Nursery is located in De Pere, Wis. at 2325 Oak Ridge Circle. For info on their plants, please visit http://www.stonesiloprairi.

Murder Hornets unlikely to reach Wisconsin

They’ve arrived in the United States with a scary nickname and they look even scarier .Vespa Mandarina murder hornet Credit: Filippo Turetta/Wikimedia But according to experts, there’s a good chance Wisconsin will never be home to the so-called “murder hornet.” Native to Asia, but recently found in the Pacific Northwest, Asian giant hornets, also known as murder hornets, are about two inches long. They are vicious predators. “They will attack honeybees and they can destroy thousands of individuals. They basically bite their heads off and then carry their bodies back to feed their babies,” says UW-Green BayProfessor Michael Draney (Natural and Applied Sciences).

Source: Murder Hornets unlikely to reach Wisconsin

Biologist (Draney) puts Wisconsinites at ease on ‘Murder Hornets’ | WLUK

There’s an insect generating some buzz in the U.S. but one local biology professor says we don’t have to worry about it coming to Wisconsin. UW-Green Bay Biology Prof. Michael Draney joined Good Day Wisconsin to discuss “murder hornets.” Or so what some are calling them. It’s real name is the Asian Giant Hornet.

Source: Biologist puts Wisconsinites at ease on ‘Murder Hornets’ | WLUK

Faculty note: Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi publishes article

Assistant Prof. Mandeep Singh Bakshi (Chemistry, NAS) recently published an article in the “International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.” The article is titled, Photophysical behavior of heme group: Unfolding of hemoglobin and myoglobin in the presence of Gemini surfactants of different molecular architectures.” This work highlights the photophysical behavior of hemoglobin and myoglobin to predict their interactions with complex biological molecules.

Photo with graphic title picturing Senior Lecturer Nydia Villanueva preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the chemistry lab at UW-Green bay, as she gets ready to teach students in Principals of Chemistry II Lab at UW-Green Bay.

Video: Teaching Chemistry remotely, Nydia Villanueva

Here’s an example of teaching remotely. Senior lecturer Nydia Villanueva (NAS) preps for an experiment on quantitative analysis in the Chemistry Lab on the Green Bay Campus. Her students are taking Principals of Chemistry II Lab remotely.

Here she records the experiment and posts the video online.

Video by Sue Pischke, Marketing and University Communication

Taking caring of a colony of cockroaches while schools remain closed | WLUK

Schools and colleges remain closed across the state due to a state order issued by Gov. Tony Evers.But most teachers and professors continue to work from home. UW-Green Bay Professor Michael Draney (NAS) is part of the environmental science department at UWGB, he still heads to school, once a week to care for his Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches. It takes about 10 minutes to feed them. He doesn’t want to bring them home. Source: Taking caring of a colony of cockroaches while schools remain closed | WLUK

Falcon Cam Photo

Follow UW-Green Bay’s nesting Peregrines Mimi and Rupert via webcam

Thanks to the work of dedicated students (especially Jacob Woulf, Brandon Byrne, and Noah Nei), faculty mentors (Amy Wolf and Bob Howe), the UW-Green Bay IT staff (especially Ron Kottnitz and Monika Pynaker), Paul Pinkston and staff at Facilities Management, and support from the Cofrin Center for Biodiversity and local bird enthusiasts Paul and Annie Mueller, the nest of UW-Green Bay’s Peregrine Falcons (Mimi and Rupert) is available for online viewing. The nest, located in a converted vent near the top of the Cofrin Library, can be followed at UW-Green Bay Peregrine Falcon Nest Box LiveStream video on YouTube.

See the Falcon Cam

Reports Wolf, “The first egg was laid last week, and Mimi and Rupert are now incubating four eggs! We expect the young to hatch around April 24-26. We all hope that these spectacular birds will provide some enjoyment for you and others, especially during these difficult times.”

Find more about the history of this endangered pair, see our 2017 article Campus Cliffhanger: A team of volunteers bands together for successful birth and banding of Peregrine falcons.

May, 14, 2019 photo of falcon nest.

Watch the International Women’s Day panel at Manitowoc Campus on Facebook

On Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in honor of International Women’s Day this past Sunday, Associate Prof. Rebecca Abler (Water Science), Associate Prof. Amy Kabrhel (Natural and Applied Sciences), Assistant Prof. Breeyawn Lybbert (Natural and Applied Sciences) and Associate Prof. Megumi Onoda (Mathematics and Statistics) held a panel discussion on Women in STEM. If you couldn’t make it in person, you can watch online now.