Upcoming iPat films

Save the date for the upcoming iPat (impact = population * affluence * technology) films, part of the 7th Annual iPat Environmental Film Series.

Enjoy entertaining and thought-provoking films that evaluate the condition of the natural world, identify drivers of environmental harm, and consider solutions. At the conclusion of each film a community expert or panel will offer their insights, draw our attention to relevant local issues, and answer questions from the audience.

The films are free admission and sponsored by Public & Environmental Affairs, Public and Environmental Affairs Council (PEAC) and Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI). Screenings occur in the Christie Theatre on the Green Bay campus.

Schedule

Nov. 5, 2018, 7 p.m.: “Comfort Zone”

Dec. 3, 2018, 7 p.m.: “Of Shark and Man”

For more information, contact Ashley Heath at 920-465-2608 or heatha@uwgb.edu or Elizabeth Wheat at 920-465-2848 or wheate@uwgb.edu.

Tonight (Sept. 11): iPat Film Series, ‘After the Spill’

The iPat (impact = population * affluence * technology) Environmental Film Series is back for fall 2017. “After the Spill,” is the first in the series, showing on Monday, Sept. 11 2017 at 7 p.m. in the Christie Theatre, UW-Green Bay. “After the Spill” explores how people are trying to save the Gulf Coast after the effects of Hurricane Katrina and the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon. Has life returned to normal along Louisiana’s coastline? Or has it been changed forever? A local expert will also be on hand to host a Q & A session following the film. This event is free and open to the public.

iPat Environmental Film Series: Screening of SoLa, May 1

The UW-Green Bay iPat environmental film series continues with a screening of “SoLa: Louisiana Water Stories” at 7 p.m. Monday, May 1 at the Brown County Central Library (515 Pine Street). The documentary explores the relationship between man and water, from the rich culture of Cajun Country to environmental disasters that have tested the region. SoLa investigates how the exploitation of Southern Louisiana’s abundant natural resources compromised the resiliency of its ecology and culture, multiplying the devastating impact of the BP oil spill and Hurricane Katrina. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs, and the Brown County Library. All showings are free and open to the public. A local expert will be on hand to offer commentary and answer questions following the screening.  Contact Ashley Heath at heatha@uwgb.edu with any questions.

UW-Green Bay iPat Film: ‘Big Boys Gone Bananas’, April 3

The UW-Green Bay iPat environmental film series returns with a screening of “Big Boys Gone Bananas” at 7 p.m. Monday, April 3, 2017 in the UW-Green Bay Christie Theatre. The film has been called a classic David vs. Goliath story. Find out what happens to a documentary filmmaker when he goes up against a large corporation like Dole Foods. The iPat Film Series is sponsored by the Public and Environmental Affairs Council, The Center for Public Affairs, the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Brown County Library. All showings are free and open to the public. Following each film, a local expert will be on hand to offer commentary and answer questions. For questions, contact Ashley Heath, heatha@uwgb.edu.

Learn about water with the film TAPPED

Tonight at 7 p.m. (Dec. 5) at the Brown County Central Library, the iPat (impact = population * affluence * technology) Environmental Film Series presents the film TAPPED. The film explores the role of the bottled water industry, its effects on our health, climate change and pollution and our reliance on oil. A local expert will also be on hand to host a Q & A session following the film. This event is free and open to the public.

iPat Environmental Film Series: Bananas showing tonight!

Juan “Accidentes” Dominguez is on his biggest case ever. On behalf of 12 Nicaraguan banana workers he is tackling Dole Food in a ground-breaking legal battle for their use of a banned pesticide alleged to cause sterility. The film is “Bananas” and it screens at 7 p.m. tonight (Monday, Nov. 7) in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Admission is free. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is an environmental film series sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Final iPat movie is ‘The Boyhood of John Muir’

The final iPat move of the semester will be at 7 p.m. Monday, April 4 in the Christie Theater. “The Boyhood of John Muir,” is a dramatic and compelling look at the early life of America’s first great spokesman for wilderness. This film tells the story of Muir, a Scottish immigrant to Wisconsin, who is known today as the founder of Yosemite National Park, the Sierra Club, and as America’s first environmentalist. Free admission and popcorn provided. If professors would like to use it as an extra credit opportunity, a sign-in sheet will be monitored. Contact John Stoll, stollj@uwgb.edu for more information.

iPat movie: ‘Andromeda Strain’

At 7 p.m. this coming Monday (Dec. 7) in the Christie Theatre, the iPat film series will revisit a classic Hollywood thriller that “went viral” back in the days when UWGB was still new. With a nod to UWGB’s 50th anniversary, “The Andromeda Strain” from 1971 will be screened with an introduction and discussion led by Christine Vandenhouten, associate professor of Nursing. It’s a chance to discuss the movie — about a military space capsule that brings a deadly microbe back to Earth — and its current relevance to public health in an age of renewed concern over viruses, pandemics and climate change. Free admission and popcorn! If faculty would like to use this for an extra credit assignment, we can monitor a sign-in sheet for your class. The film series is sponsored by the Public and Environmental Affairs Department, the Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and The Common Theme initiative. Questions? Contact John Stoll, stollj@uwgb.edu or 465-2358.