First fall Global Studies Roundtable is Friday, Sept. 25, 1 p.m. Public is invited

Please join us Friday, Sept 25 at 1 p.m. (CT) for the first of the Fall Global Studies Roundtable discussions. Margaret Wenger from the Milwaukee-based Educational Credential Evaluators will be speaking on: Taxi Drivers and Doctors: Comparative education and Student Mobility.

“When the student sitting next to you in class (or on the Zoom), or the dentist who filled your cavity came from another country, who decided that they had the appropriate educational background? In many cases, it’s someone who specializes in comparative education. In a globalized, mobile world, more and more people are educated in multiple countries, with different grade, credit, and accreditation practices, as well as different underlying educational philosophies. The speaker, an international credential evaluator, will introduce the field and its applications, and why it matters to everyone, whether you study abroad or not, with a few pointers in spotting fake educational documents.”

The public is invited to this discussion taking place via Microsoft Teams at this link.

 

 

Marina Delbecchi

Marina Delbecchi said she was never alone in her new virtual journey

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrate that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Marina Delbecchi is an organizational leadership major. Her minors are public administration, political science and global studies.

Marina Delbecchi

“Having classes that are all online or majority online can be tough, but my professors at UWGB never made me feel alone on this journey. It’s easy to forget that any annoyances we may have with online classes, our professors do too, so they are more than willing to go out of their way to help. Plus with options for Zoom meetings and hybrid courses meeting every other week, you still get the chance to form relationships with your professors (which is the best part of college!). The largest piece of advice I have related to online courses is to stay up-to-date with your UWGB email because it holds important information and will be your lifeline while not in the classroom!”

Faculty note: New publication from Profs. Levintova and Coury

Prof. Katia Levintova (Democracy and Justice Studies and Global Studies) and Prof. David Coury (Humanities and Global Studies) have published the jointly authored article “Poland, Germany and the EU: Reimagining Central Europe” in the journal Europe-Asia Studies. The article was based on a collaborative research projecting examing the use of the terms “Central” or “Middle” Europe in the Polish and German press and how that region is understood today.

Faculty note: Professors Boswell and Levintova invite readers to Syllabus Journal

Syllabus Journal, co-edited by Caroline Boswell and Katia Levintova with editorial assistance by Patrick Sicula (UWGB class of 2020), has just published its latest issue. You are invited to review the Table of Contents and then visit the website to review articles and items of interest. This special issue contains timely discussion on the state of the syllabus, especially its meaning and tone, all the more pressing, given unprecedented challenges currently confronting higher education. In the words of guest editors, “Positioning the syllabus as a key artifact in the modern academy, one that encapsulates many elements of intellectual, scholarly, social, cultural, political, and institutional contexts in which it is enmeshed, we offer in this special issue of Syllabus a set of provocations on the syllabus and its many roles. Including perspectives from full-time and part-time faculty, graduate students, and librarians, the issue offers a multifaceted take on how the syllabus is presently used and might be reimagined.

Faculty note: Political Talk—The Political Implications of Pandemic Language

In CAHSS and Effect, UW-Green Bay professors Alise Coen and David Coury look at the language used in regard to the current pandemic. “The spring of 2020 is now irrevocably intertwined with the word pandemic. On March 11, the Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) assessed that, based on “the alarming levels of spread and severity” as well as “alarming levels of inaction,” COVID-19 must be characterized as a pandemic – something which could not easily be “controlled.” Other anxiety-inducing terms like crisis and emergency have also animated public conversations about the COVID-19 outbreak. On March 13, President Trump declared a “national emergency” in response to the spread of the coronavirus, drawing on executive authorities granted by the U.S. Constitution and laws such as the National Emergencies Act to activate a range of special provisions and presidential powers. In his presidential briefings, Trump has termed the virus a “medical crisis…a thing that nobody has seen for many, many decades.” Similarly, a wide range of media outlets have used the language of crisis in their coverage of COVID-19, with headlines in the New York Times, NPR, Fox News, and the Wall Street Journal repeatedly referencing “the Coronavirus Crisis.” It is easy to take these terms for granted as they increasingly saturate our media and political environments. But the words we use to describe situations like the current COVID-19 outbreak can be powerful, not only in shaping our interpretations and understandings of what is happening, but also in shaping our expectations of what constitutes appropriate responses. Let us begin with a deeper look at the origins of these terms.”

Professers Coen and Coury write about ‘political implications of pandemic language’

UW-Green Bay professors Alise Coen (Political Science, Public & Environmental Affairs) and David Coury (Humanities and German, Global Studies) combined their expertise across disciplines to write about the political implications of pandemic language. See CAHSS and Effect for their piece, Political Talk: The Political Implications of Pandemic Language.

Coronavirus Discussion, Fact And Fiction, at UW-Green Bay | News | WTAQ

A panel of experts discussed the global response of the coronavirus on UW-Green Bay’s campus. The UWGB Global Studies program hosted the free, roundtable discussion Thursday. The panel included campus nursing professors, Christine Vandenhouten and Rebecca Hovarter, along with Brian Merkel, professor of Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics. Source: Coronavirus Discussion, Fact And Fiction, At UW-Green Bay | News | WTAQ

‘Virus Without Borders’: UW-Green Bay takes a closer look at the impact of the coronavirus | WLUK

A panel of experts discussed the global response of the coronavirus on UW-Green Bay’s campus. The UWGB Global Studies program hosted the free, roundtable discussion Thursday. The panel included campus nursing professors, Christine Vandenhouten and Rebecca Hovarter, along with Brian Merkel, professor of Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics. Source: ‘Virus Without Borders’: UW-Green Bay takes a closer look at the impact of the coronavirus | WLUK

“Virus Without Borders:” Coronavirus discussion takes center stage at UW-Green Bay | #wearegreenbay.com#

UW-Green Bay professors took a comprehensive look at the threat of and response to the Coronavirus Thursday afternoon, March 5, 2020 at the Christie Theatre. The event, called “Virus Without Borders” took place from 3 to 4:30 p.m. UW-Green Bay Professors Chris Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing), and Brian Merkel (Human Biology) covering symptoms of the virus, testing and treatment options, the current state of the outbreak, the effectiveness of a quarantine, vaccine development, and other topics related to COVID-19. The panel also spoke about how the community can help prevent the person-to-person spread of the virus. Source: “Virus Without Borders:” Coronavirus discussion takes center stage at UW–Green Bay | #wearegreenbay.com#

Video: Virus Without Borders

On Thursday, March 5, 2020, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Global Studies program presented “Virus Without Borders: The Global Threat and Response to COVID-19,” a free, multi-disciplinary look at the Coronavirus outbreak for the University community and the public. The panel consisted of UW-Green Bay professors Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing, Global Studies), Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and Brian Merkel (Human Biology and local organizer of the Tiny Earth event to discover new antibiotics.)

Panelists connected with local media, offered their expertise and answered audience questions. Watch the presentation below.

Video captured by: UW-Green Bay Academic Technology Services