Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Task Force | WHBY

Ahead of their quarterly meeting in March, Wisconsin’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Task Force member Kristin Welch joined Josh to explain the work of the Task Force and describe the impact of missing women and girls on their families and the broader community. She will be part of a virtual panel on this topic at UW-Green Bay on Tue Feb 23 at 5:30 p.m.

Source: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Task Force | WHBY

Higher education rates for Native Americans remain low, but unique scholarships helping | Green Bay Press-Gazette

Graduates of the UW-Green Bay doctoral program “will have the knowledge to significantly impact education, policy development, and advocacy at state, federal and sovereign nation levels,” according to Dr. Lisa Poupart, director of the program, who is a member of the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe in Wisconsin.

Source: Higher education rates for Native Americans remain low, but unique scholarships helping | Green Bay Press-Gazette

New scholarship honors UW-Green Bay alumna and former State Representative Sharon Metz

The Sharon and Thomas Metz Scholarship will benefit undergraduate students who are majoring in First Nations Studies and demonstrate financial need. It will be renewable for up to two years. Mitch Metz, son of Sharon and Tom, says this scholarship aims to carry on his parents’ fight for recognition and respect for indigenous people. Donations to the fund are being accepted.

Source: New scholarship honors UW-Green Bay alumna and former State Representative Sharon Metz, Seehafer News

First Nations Studies scholarship created in memory of Green Bay couple

A new scholarship at UW-Green Bay honors a former State Representative and UW-Green Bay alumna and her husband. Sharon Metz, a 1984 Communication and the Arts major, passed away in June of this year. The Sharon and Thomas Metz Scholarship will benefit undergraduate students who are majoring in First Nations Studies and demonstrate financial need. Source: First Nations Studies scholarship created in memory of Green Bay couple, FOX11

The Comm Voice: Elder hours go virtual

“Under normal circumstances, UW-Green Bay offers the experience of having students converse with on-site First Nations Oral Scholars in the Residence Elder Hours program in Wood Hall. Due to Covid-19, this experience has changed. Normally, the office would be crowded with students, but this semester it is completely virtual with only one elder instead of three. This opportunity for students to ask questions and understand the perspective of First Nations people is important for those majoring in FNS or majoring in other fields.” To read the full article, visit the Comm Voice Website.

Authors are UW-Green Bay students Grace Merkt, Travis Boulanger and Wynna Bonde

GB Dietetic Intern creates lesson for nonprofit organization

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, Wello—a nonprofit organization shares a farm-to-school lesson which focuses on the Oneida Nation‘s Three Sisters. Crystal Meltz, UW-Green Bay Dietetic intern and member of Oneida Nation, created this lesson (and narrates) as part of her internship . While this is designed for teachers to use with their students, it’s a great resource for anyone in the community interested in learning more about Oneida Nation and they encourage you to check out their Facebook post on the virtual lesson.

Peshtigo River

Green Bay fall wild rice seeding planned for late October

Small teams of conservation professionals and volunteers from UW-Green Bay, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, UW-Madison Division of Extension, and others will seed 2,000 lbs. of wild rice at coastal wetlands in the bay of Green Bay during the week of October 26-30, 2020.

This year marks the fourth year of seeding effort as part of the restoration projects, informed by UW-Green Bay aquatic vegetation research in lower Green Bay. See past efforts. Wild rice or “manoomin” holds important traditional, economic, and spiritual value in the region for Wisconsin’s First Nation tribes.

Wild rice also benefits waterfowl as an important food source during fall migration and contributes to fish nursery habitat and ecological diversity in coastal wetlands. Historical records suggest the wetland grass occurred in the waters of the bay of Green Bay; however, rice has been uncommon to rare in coastal wetlands and tributaries in recent decades. UW-Green Bay graduate student research helps conservation partners learn more about wild rice seeding success and environmental conditions impacting aquatic vegetation.

Rice re-establishment is one of a series of restoration projects in lower Green Bay and along the Green Bay west shore to enhance coastal wetland habitat for fish and wildlife and improve the health of the bay. Participants will hand seed the rice at 6 sites in lower Green Bay and along the Green Bay west shore on the following dates:

  • Monday, Oct. 26: Green Bay west shore: Seagull Bar State Natural Area and Oconto Marsh Wildlife Area & Oconto Sportsmen’s Club Tuesday
  • Tuesday, Oct. 27: Lower Green Bay: Duck Creek and Ken Euers Nature Area
  • Wednesday, Oct. 28- Suamico: Sensiba Wildlife Area & Barkhausen Waterfowl Preserve
  • Thursday and Friday, Oct. 29 and 30, Weather make-up days

Media members may view seeding from an observation point on land at most locations. All participants and observers will be expected to follow COVID-19 safety guidelines. For more information about the project or the seeding effort, contact Green Bay Restoration Project Coordinator Amy Carrozzino-Lyon (carrozza@uwgb.edu, 920-465-5029).

First to fill a First Nations Graduate Assistant position – Wisconsin Sea Grant

Note: This story is reprinted with permission from author Marie Zhuikov and Wisconsin Sea Grant

Stephanie King of Oneida, Wisconsin, is breaking new ground. Not only is she first to fill a position with Wisconsin Sea Grant designed to strengthen relationships with First Nation tribes in the Green Bay area, she is in the first cohort of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s First Nations Education Doctoral Program.

Stephanie King, photo submitted

Although her position, which also involves the UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, is just beginning, King said her role will be to incorporate Indigenous knowledge and traditional ecological knowledge as part of a team that’s restoring wetlands north of the Green Bay campus on Wequiock Creek.

“That area is ancestral lands for the Ho-Chunk Nation, Menominee Nation and I believe the Potawatomi, as well,” King said.

The assistantship opened at just at the right time. King, who is enrolled in the Oneida Nation but was raised on the Menominee Reservation, was laid off from her cultural wellness work for the Oneida Nation due to COVID-19 factors.

“I was excited when I saw the position. When I was reading through the announcement, the requirements brought my higher educational experience and passions full circle. I thought it would be a unique opportunity to share my experiences and knowledge with others and the team. I decided to throw my name in the hat and see what happened,” King said.

One of the reasons King’s name was plucked from that proverbial hat was her academic background. King has an associate degree in sustainable development from the College of Menominee Nation, a bachelor’s degree in family, consumer and community education from UW-Madison and a master’s degree in educational leadership with a focus on adult education from UW-Oshkosh.

Julia Noordyk, Wisconsin Sea Grant water quality and coastal communities outreach specialist, is King’s mentor. “Stephanie’s knowledge and experience working with people of all ages and backgrounds is a good fit for Wisconsin Sea Grant,” Noordyk said. “I am always focused on how we can most successfully engage with our audiences, so her expertise in education and outreach lends perfectly to this.”

King had the chance to visit the Wequiock Creek sites and “got an idea of some of the potential goals that all the different people involved have. There are still conversations to be had about what the First Nations communities would like to see as well, so that will come next,” King said.

King also said this position fits well with her life goals. “My foundation for my education, my work and my research has been with a passion to give back to my community and to my people. In any opportunity I take, I always look at how is this going to benefit others and benefit the community as well as my family in a good way, in a positive way.”

While on paper Noordyk is King’s supervisor and mentor, Noordyk acknowledges there is already more to their relationship. “Stephanie comes to this assistantship with a deep understanding of education, outreach and communication with First Nations people. It would be foolish of me not to learn as much as possible from her, too.”

Source: First to fill a First Nations Graduate Assistant position – Wisconsin Sea Grant

Menominee teacher Ben Grignon wins national award | Post Crescent

Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon
 Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon

A Menominee Indian High School arts teacher was recognized this month by the National Education Association for helping to promote traditional crafts and culture to his students.

Ben Grignon, 42, a member of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, accepted the National Human and Civil Rights Award via a virtual ceremony because of the ongoing pandemic.

Grignon is currently pursuing his doctorate in First Nations Studies at UW-Green Bay and plans to further incorporate mathematics and science into his art teachings.

Source: Menominee teacher Ben Grignon wins national award | Post Crescent

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UW-Green Bay offers entire course on Native American issues to aspiring educators | Post Crescent

The way Native American history is taught throughout the state of Wisconsin allows for inconsistencies. The UW-System has a variation in how Native American history is taught to college students, with UW-Green Bay one such University that offers an entire course dedicated to First Nations Studies for future educators. Other colleges offer a 50-minute program. More via Wisconsin law says kids must be taught Native American issues, but teachers say they don’t know how | Post Crescent.