Menominee teacher Ben Grignon wins national award | Post Crescent

Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon
 Waqnahwew Benjamin Grignon

A Menominee Indian High School arts teacher was recognized this month by the National Education Association for helping to promote traditional crafts and culture to his students.

Ben Grignon, 42, a member of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, accepted the National Human and Civil Rights Award via a virtual ceremony because of the ongoing pandemic.

Grignon is currently pursuing his doctorate in First Nations Studies at UW-Green Bay and plans to further incorporate mathematics and science into his art teachings.

Source: Menominee teacher Ben Grignon wins national award | Post Crescent

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UW-Green Bay offers entire course on Native American issues to aspiring educators | Post Crescent

The way Native American history is taught throughout the state of Wisconsin allows for inconsistencies. The UW-System has a variation in how Native American history is taught to college students, with UW-Green Bay one such University that offers an entire course dedicated to First Nations Studies for future educators. Other colleges offer a 50-minute program. More via Wisconsin law says kids must be taught Native American issues, but teachers say they don’t know how | Post Crescent.

Spring Elder Hours begin on Feb. 10

Spring Elder Hours on the Green Bay Campus will begin on Monday, Feb. 10 and will go through Saturday, May 9, 2020. All are welcome to attend and ask questions or simply listen to the elders; no appointments are necessary. Elder hours take place in Wood Hall 410. If you have any questions, please contact Cultural Resource Specialist Bailey Tlachac at tlacba11@uwgb.edu. Below is the weekly schedule.

Mondays: Napos, noon to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays: Georgia Burr, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Napos, 1 to 2 p.m. and 3:45 to 5:15 p.m.
Thursdays: Laura Cornelius, 9 a.m. to noon.

Reminder: Learn about a doula on Friday, Nov. 22

First Nations Studies will be hosting business owner/doula, Nakita J. Tepolt, in the Education Center for First Nations Studies, Wood Hall 410 on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This event is free and open to all faculty, students and members of the public. Among the topics Tepolt will discuss are pregnancy, labor, birth, postpartum and breastfeeding. Light refreshments and snacks provided.

Reminder: And So We Walked Nov. 14-16 at Weidner Center

“And So We Walked: An Artist’s journey along the Trial of Tears” will be at the Weidner Center from Thursday, Nov. 14 through Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019 in Fort Howard Hall. This performance chronicles the journey of a modern Cherokee woman and her father walking the 900-mile “Trail of Tears” path. The Thursday performance is sold out, but the three remaining performances on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 16 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. still have tickets available.

What’s a doula? Learn more Friday, Nov. 22

The First Nations Studies will be hosting business owner/doula, Nakita J. Tepolt, in the Education Center for First Nations Studies, Wood Hall 410 on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 from 11:30 to 1 p.m. This event is free and open to all faculty, students and members of the public. Among the topics Tepolt will discuss: pregnancy, labor, birth, postpartum and breastfeeding. Light refreshments and snacks provided.

 

First Nations students meet with Department of Public Instruction

On May 17, 2019, students in the First Nations Studies Seminar (FNS 391) traveled to Madison to present to officials at the Department of Public Instruction. Students in the course had spent the semester learning about state laws requiring instruction in the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of the federally recognized tribes and bands in Wisconsin in K-12 schools and teacher education programs, requirements commonly known as “Act 31.”  State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor, members of her cabinet, and program staff in American Indian Studies, Social Studies, and other programs listened attentively as UW-Green Bay students Dolly Potts, Elizabeth Howard, Crystal Danforth, Ana Olp, Holly Daniels, Nate Bowman, and Marla Mahkimetas, shared their policy research and recommendations related to instructional materials, preservice teacher education, in-service teacher professional development, systemic capacity issues, and examples of success in other states. These students will be following up to share a written report with their complete findings. fns 391 to DPI spring 2019 copyDPI staff members have already been invited them to serve as partners and reviewers on several projects in progress.

In the photo: Left to right, back row: Tamara Mouw (Dir. Content and Learning Team); Crystal Danforth, Elizabeth Howard, J P Leary, David O’Connor (American Indian Studies Consultant). Middle row Ana Olp, Marla Mahkimetas, State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor, Dr. Sheila Briggs (Asst. State Superintendent for Academic Excellence), Kris McDaniel (Social Studies Consultant). Front Row, Holly Daniels, Nate Bowman, Dolly Potts, Connie Ellingson (Office Operations Associate)

Elder Napos discusses the origin of Wisconsin’s name

Ever wonder how Wisconsin got its name? So did Josie Dunn, a student at Mineral Point Elementary School. Turns out, it is not a simple question to answer. The name Wisconsin comes from the Algonquian language family spoken by tribes such as the Menominee, but the pronunciation is not the same today. A UW-Green Bay Elder in Residence and member of Menominee tribe, Napos Turney, says he was told it comes from the Menominee word “Wēskōhsaeh.” The word translates to something like “a good place to camp” or “to basically live.” See more from WPR.

 

First Nations Studies class visit Ho-Chunk Nation

Visitors from the Black River Falls High school paid a visit to GIS Specialist Niklas Anderson of the Ho-Chunk Nation Realty Division on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Sixteen students and History and Social Studies Instructor Paul Rykken came to see what kind of work Anderson does and how it fits in with the objectives of the Ho-Chunk people.

“I wanted to give the students an introduction to geography and all the tools geographers use, especially Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS),” Anderson said. The group was from a class is called “First Nations Studies: Introduction to the Tribal World.” — a dual-credit offering with UW-Green Bay First Nations and the College Credit in High School program. Read the story in the Hocak Worak.