Applications to Education Program are due Oct. 2

Please spread the word. Applications are due Friday, Oct. 2, 2020 for students applying to be a Spring 2021 candidate in the Professional Program in Education. To apply, please submit the Application for Candidate Status Form. If you have questions regarding the Education Program or our application requirements, please contact us at 920-465-2137 or education@uwgb.edu for more information or to schedule an advising appointment.

Campus mourns loss of retired faculty member Dennis Bryan

UW-Green Bay learned of the loss of Dennis Bryan, one of the original faculty members in UW-Green Bay’s Education program. Bryan passes away on August 21, 2020. He served as a professor for 27 years. Honoring his wishes, there was no public funeral services. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Nature Conservancy. See the full obituary.

UW-Green Bay education major Kiara Verduzco talks about ‘the new normal’

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrated that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Kiara Verduzco

Kiara Verduzco is a sophomore majoring in Early Childhood Education.

“With everything going on in the world, there’s a lot of new normalities. Online learning has been something to adjust to, but it was made easier than I thought thanks to all of the support from UWGB. Professors are always an email away, and provide many resources that help you be as successful as possible. Some of these resources include: zoom meetings, Q&A sessions and emailing you frequently to keep you updated. The amount of support and care the faculty provide has made online schooling a much smoother sail!”

UW-Green Bay’s transition to online learning helped student Taylor Schreiber feel more confident about virtual learning

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrated that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Taylor Schreiber is an Education major entering her junior year.

“Nothing can replace walking to your first class of the semester after an exciting time of just

Taylor Schreiber

moving in for the fall or starting your college experience, but amongst the current situation, UW-Green Bay faculty and staff are working to support students in the best way possible. While on campus, I thought I already used my email too often, but as everything shifted to online, this became even more important. Professors were very responsive, accommodating, and understanding when it came to class work, exam schedules and any other questions I had via email. Through lecture videos and screen recording, I was able to learn the necessary information in my classes. My professors also included ungraded quizzes, created questions boards and used other tools to assure students’ understanding of the material. When necessary, professors would hold class meeting times to catch up and clarify class content. Most would even host optional office hours via video conferencing! Of course it was nice working on papers and quizzes in sweatpants after rolling right out of bed, but I also found it extremely helpful to stick to a schedule and daily routine. This helped me stay organized and maintain motivation!

As an Education major, I will always prefer being in class with peers and professors because in-person discussion and interactive class work can never be replaced. However, UW-Green Bay’s ease while transitioning to online class work made me feel much more confident as I was adjusting the way I learn.”

Faculty note: Miranda Schornack’s recent publication named ‘Feature Article’ by educational organization

Assistant Prof. Miranda Schornack (Education) recently co-authored an article titled “How dispositions are(n’t) addressed in the English learner case study assignment.” In August 2020, the Minnesota Chapter of Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages named the article by Schornack et al. (2020) as a Feature Article. Being named a Feature Article is a formal recognition of the manuscript for its importance and impact on the field of multilingual education.

Berens and Beyond: Here’s What It Means to Be a Wisconsinite (interview with Prof. Lor)

Pao Lor, a longtime school administrator and coach in northeastern Wisconsin who’s now an education professor at UW-Green Bay, saw many of his fellow members of the state’s immigrant Hmong community feel welcomed to Wisconsin and adopt many facets of the Eurocentric Sconnie culture. They became deer hunters, Packers fans. “People were friendly to a great extent. Those are some of the things that we were defined by,” he says. There was a confidence that Wisconsin’s long-established progressive culture would carry the day over the challenges any immigrant community faces.But, Lor says, that began to change recently. “I think the political climate in the last 10 years revealed certain aspects of Wisconsin that were not as welcoming,” he says. “I think it’s hard for someone from a minority background to regain that trust.”

Source: Berens and Beyond: Here’s What It Means to Be a Wisconsinite

UW-Green Bay Psychology student Hayley Verbenten shares virtual learning advice

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrated that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Hayley Verbenten

Hayley Verbenten is a junior Psychology major with an emphasis in Mental Health and an Education minor.

“Personally, I thought I would struggle with having all online classes when we were told we would have to make the transition in spring. I was used to having one or two online classes and the rest in-person. I like the structure of having in person classes, and it serves as a reminder for me to make sure I am getting all of my homework and studying done. When moving to online classes, I tried to make sure I treated them as normal classes. I would set aside certain times and days for each class, as well as time to study and do any extra work required for the class. I always kept an assignment notebook to keep myself organized. Working ahead is always a good option if possible!

There are so many peer mentors, faculty advisors and other professors that are willing to help if you are having trouble with online classes. We also have an IT department that is great for all questions with printers, computers, etc.

The most important things are to make sure you stay organized, and don’t be afraid to reach out for help! It is better to ask for help right away than fall behind.”

Faculty note: Assistant Professor Miranda Schornack publishes article

UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Miranda Schornack (Education), published an article in the MinneTESOL Journal Spring 2020 Issue. Schornack co-authored the manuscript with Michelle Benegas and Amy Stolpestad from Hamline University (St. Paul, MN). The article is titled “How dispositions are(n’t) addressed in the English learner case study assignment and examines an assignment common in English as a second language methods courses—the English learner case study (or learner profile)—for dispositional development and explores how teacher educators can be more explicit and thorough in cultivating educator dispositions for working with multilingual students.”

David L. and Rita E. Nelson Family Fund continues to invest in Education

The David L. and Rita E. Nelson Family Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region recently awarded $2,362,100 in grants to local and state nonprofit organizations reflecting the charitable interests of the late couple and their family. The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay received $91,600 to add to the Rita E. Nelson Endowed Scholarship for Education Students Fund. The scholarship, at Rita’s alma mater, will provide two non-traditional students majoring in education with a $2,500 scholarship award annually.

“Nontraditional students come from all walks of life, and bring an expansive, critical repertoire of life experiences that enrich the classes and students they will one day teach,” says Pao Lor chairperson, Professional Program in Education, UW-Green Bay. “We are most grateful that many nontraditional students choose to pursue a career in teaching, and we are also most grateful there are individuals like David and Rita Nelson who shared the same vision and the generosity to provide the financial support to pursue it.” Last year’s recipient, Frances Nazario, said the news of her scholarship came at exactly the right time: “After this semester, I will no longer receive any kind of federal aid. So I’m pulling from wherever I can. And this came at a perfect time, because I just didn’t know if next semester was going to happen. And I was very scared because I have three semesters left.”

To UW-Green Bay and to the Nelson family, Frances says: “I don’t know if there are enough words for me to even express my gratitude. You’ve inspired me, and you’ve taken a big weight off my shoulders. A very humble thank you.”

UW-Green Bay junior Autumn Rettke was ‘blown away’ with online learning transition

Although UW-Green Bay is intending to be open in fall and welcoming faculty, staff and students back on campus, some classes originally scheduled for in-person instruction will be moving online or having online aspects to them for the safety of the UW-Green Bay community. Current UW-Green Bay students who transitioned to online learning in Spring 2020 demonstrate that they are resilient problem-solvers and describe their experiences while providing some advice to future students…

Autumn Rettke is a junior majoring in English Education and minoring in Dance.

Autumn Rettke

“When the spring classes switched from in-person to online-only, I was very concerned about my Education and Dance courses, because the two focus on elements that are best learned through in-person observation. I was blown away with how well my professors maintained the personal element of these courses while remaining completely online. We participated in discussions, group work and peer edits, which helped uphold the feeling of community that comes along with in-person classes. All of my professors offered email check-ins, over-the-phone meetings and even Zoom office hours. I always felt that my professors were not only prepared but also genuinely invested in their students’ well-being.”