‘Food Chains’ documentary screening, April 12

The documentary Food Chains will be screened at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, 2017 in the Christie Theatre. The documentary reveals the human cost in our food supply and the complicity of large buyers of produce like fast food and super-markets. The film is free and snacks will be provided. The screening is sponsored by the Common Theme Task Force, American Intercultural Center, and la Organización Latino Americana.

Campus Common Theme for 2016-2017 announced

“Food for Thought — Food Matters in the Community, Health, and Culture” is the 2016-17 Campus Common Theme. The proposers are finalizing numerous activities throughout the academic year to highlight food as it relates to culture and ethnic diversity, public policy, and environmental and human health issues. Activities explore all dimensions of the food system from production, distribution, consumption, and disposal to provoke thinking and dialogue on the sustainability and social justice challenges facing us. Questions should go to Stephanie Kaponya (kaponyas@uwgb.edu) or Donna Ritch (ritchd@uwgb.edu). Upcoming events and activities can be found here.

Spring into Gardening Event this weekend

Join the UWGB Childcare Alliance, Campus Common Theme and other sponsors this Sunday, May 22 for the family-friendly event, “Spring into Gardening,” from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Student Services Plaza, UWGB. Here is the line-up:

  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. — First Nations and Three Sisters Gardening – children will be shown how to plant and care for their own seeds.
  • 1:00, 1:45 and 2:30 p.m. — Spring-themed story times
  • 1 to 2 p.m. — Garden Tour and planting
  • 1:45 to 2:30 p.m. — Make-your-own suncatcher and crepe paper flowers
  • 1:45 p.m. — Flax Garden Presentation
  • 2 to 3 p.m. — Composting demonstration

Other activities include give-a-ways, bake sale, raffle, bubble and chalk. Bring your own plastic bags for recycling. See more at http://blog.uwgb.edu/childresourcecenter/spring-event-2016/.

iPat film series returns on Monday, March 7

The next film in the iPat series is “Wrenched,” — exploring deviant behavior as a mode of achieving environmental action. The film will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, March 7 in the Christie Theatre. “When environmental consequences of human activity are unacceptable, is socially unacceptable behavior acceptable? What are the limits when trying to bring about environmental change?” See the movie and interact with faculty  (Public and Environmental Affairs) Karen Dalke and Elizabeth Wheat, as they provide a reaction to this film about Edward Abbey and the kind of eco-activism to which his name has become attached. Open to the public. Free admission and popcorn. Monitoring and sign-in available for extra credit if faculty provide notification. iPat stands for Impact = population, affluence and technology. The series is sponsored by Public and Environmental Affairs, the Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and The Campus Common Theme.

Popular author and illustrator Dallas Clayton on campus Monday

Children’s author, illustrator and self-publisher, mural painter and “adventure seeker” Dallas Clayton will present to campus at 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 22 in the Phoenix Rooms. Some critics have coined him as the next Dr. Seuss. He became an Internet sensation (with both commercial and critical success) when he self-published “An Awesome Book” about dreaming big. He is also author of a kids book for adults, “It’s Never Too Late.” The event is sponsored by the Office of Student Life and is a Campus Common Theme presentation. A complimentary beverage bar of hot cocoa, cider and coffee will be available at the presentation. The Phoenix Bookstore will be selling his books for signing. All are welcome. He will spend some time at Christa McAuliffe Elementary School, Green Bay the following day. Check him out at http://www.dallasclayton.com

iPat Film ‘The Power of One Voice’ is here Monday, Feb. 1

The first of the iPat Film Series will be shown at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1 in the Christie Theatre. Join the screening for The Power of One Voice. (“This 50-year perspective on the life of Rachel Carson is a groundbreaking documentary examining her life and the profound implications of her environmental work. Today, Rachel Carson remains a role model and inspiration for people across the globe, even as controversy created by her challenge to the chemical industry continues unabated.”)  Free admission and popcorn. Discussion to follow.  The film series is sponsored by Public and Environmental Affairs, The Center for Public Affairs, PEAC and The Campus Common Theme. It is free and open to the public.

2016-17 Common Theme announced

More details to follow, but this is the first announcement of the Campus Common Theme for 2016-17. The name of the theme will be “Food for Thought — Food Matters in Community, Health and Culture.” The proposers are finalizing numerous activities throughout the academic year to highlight food as it relates to culture and ethnic diversity, public policy, and environmental and human health issues. Activities would explore all dimensions of the food system — production, distribution, consumption, and disposal — to provoke thinking and dialogue on the sustainability and social justice challenges facing us. Proposers are Debra Pearson, Associate Professor, Nutrition Sciences, Co-Director – Center for Food in Community and Culture; John Katers, Associate Professor, Department of Natural and Applied Sciences; John Lyon, Associate Professor, Chair – Chemistry; Megan Olson-Hunt, Assistant Professor of Statistics; Vicki Medland, Cofrin Center for Biodiversity; Laurel Phoenix, Associate Professor, Department of Public and Environmental Affairs and Co-Director – Center for Food in Community and Culture; Sara Schmitz, Director of Nutrition Sciences/Dietetics Program and John Stoll, Professor and Chair, Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. Ideas or questions about the 2016-17 Common Theme can be sent to the proposers or Common Theme Co-Chairs, Brenda Amenson-Hill or Donna Ritch. Past themes and activities can be found at www.uwgb.edu/commontheme.

Wanted: Pre-proposals for the 2016-17 Common Theme

The UW-Green Bay Common Theme committee is requesting pre-proposals for the 2016-2017 academic year Common Theme. The theme should lend itself to interdisciplinary analysis and conversation, be of high academic caliber and conducive to scholarly dialogue, should lend itself to collaborative links across the campus (student affairs, academic affairs and community engagement), and be accessible, yet potentially engaging for students and the community. You can find past common theme topics on the Common Theme website along with guidelines for a pre-proposal. Pre-proposals should be submitted to Scott Furlong, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, by Nov. 16. Decisions on proposals will be made and communicated no later than Jan. 15, 2016.

Forbes ’30 under 30’ honoree speaks Thursday on innovation


Here’s a final reminder that visiting Common Theme speaker Brian Bordainick will make a free public presentation on campus at 7 p.m. Thursday (Oct. 8) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. The young entrepreneur learned how to involve local communities and solicit financial support during his Teach for America placement in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, where he won support for not only rebuilding but making better learning environments for the city’s youth. Since then, Bordainick has won Forbes “30 under 30” recognition as creator and CEO of an innovative restaurant-industry venture called Dinner Lab. In select cities, chefs from local restaurants create a specific, creative menu for a specific off-site setting (never in the same place twice), inviting adventurous patrons to try new creations and enjoy the experience with fellow diners they’ve not met before, and then to provide feedback for the next Dinner Lab.