Latino American history is topic of film, discussion Sept. 24 at Neville

santiago-vaquera-webScreening of a one-hour segment of the 2013 PBS documentary Latino Americans will be accompanied by a lecture and discussion featuring visiting author and scholar Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez this Thursday evening (Sept. 24) at the Neville Public Museum of Brown County.

The program, free and open to the public, begins at 6 p.m. at the Museum at 210 Museum Place on the west bank of the Fox River in downtown Green Bay. The program kicks off this year’s “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” series organized by UW-Green Bay in conjunction with the American Library Association and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

Vaquera-Vásquez is an assistant professor of creative writing and Hispanic Southwestern Literatures at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of the book One Day I’ll Tell You the Things I’ve Seen, a collection of stories about international borders and men and women “from Madrid to Mexico City, from California to Istanbul” with experience in two or more cultures.

“My scholarly work is about border-crossers and communities in contact, and how identities start being shaped by bicultural contact,” Vaquera-Vásquez told the Latin Post earlier this year. “So, I started off by looking at the U.S./Mexican border when I was living at the University of Iowa. I looked at the way migrant Mexican communities and small farming communities in the Midwest started being shaped and reshaped … and it goes both ways. The farming community expected the migrant workers to assimilate, and they, themselves, started incorporating this community into part of their experience, which I thought was fascinating.”

Thursday’s event begins with refreshments, music and brief opening remarks by Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt, among others. Vaquera-Vásquez will talk about his work and introduce the one-hour segment of the PBS documentary titled “Prejudice and Pride.” A question-and-answer and discussion session follows the film.

A collaborative effort by UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members resulted in the $10,000 grant award from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to fund the local “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” project. The public events, presentations, discussions and showings of the PBS series are part of a larger, national NEH and ALA initiative called The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.

The UW-Green Bay organizing committee — consisting of faculty members Marcelo Cruz (project director), Aurora Cortez and Gabriel Saxton Ruiz and staff members Paula Ganyard, Mai Lo Lee and Lidia Nonn — has proposed a series of communitywide events at various local venues. The group will work with Neville Museum, Brown County Library, Casa Alba and other community organizations to bring the series and discussion to the greater Green Bay community.

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Mark your calendars: Common Theme speaker on Oct. 8


Restaurant and online innovator Brian Bordainick will be the guest speaker at 7 p.m. Thursday (Oct 8) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union in a Common Theme program organized by the Office of Student Life. Bordainick is the founder and CEO of Dinner Lab, a membership-based social dining experiment that unites undiscovered chefs with adventurous diners in unique spaces — from helipads to vacant movie theaters. Dinner Lab meals highlight up-and-coming chefs from around the country, and varies the locations as an experiment in using food to build communities. The company has grown to a valuation north of $30 million and has expanded into 20 cities with 90 employees, launching restaurants based off of user feedback and data.

Common Theme chosen for 2015-16

The Common Theme for the 2015-2016 academic year will be “Engaging in Public Life.” If this sounds familiar, it is an extension of last year’s theme which was proposed by Assistant Prof. Aaron Weinschenk, Public and Environmental Affairs. In conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the UWGB and the Powers of the Phoenix: Innovation, Transformation, and Place, this year’s theme aims to get people thinking about the myriad ways in which they can engage in public life, politics and civic activities. Common Theme events start this week, so keep an eye on the calendar (and submit your own events) at www.uwgb.edu/commontheme/events. Throughout the year, the Common Theme committee also would like to highlight the many different ways in which students, faculty and staff engage in community service and public life. If you would like to share a story, photo or video of an event, please contact one of the Common Theme co-chairs, Brenda Amenson-Hill or Donna Ritch. For information on the Common Theme program, past themes and more, visit www.uwgb.edu/commontheme.
 

Common Theme proposals for 2015-16 are due April 19

Just a reminder: Brenda Amenson-Hill, dean of students, and Donna Ritch, associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, are inviting proposals for the 2015-16 academic year common theme. This year the task force is particularly interested in a theme that will help UW-Green Bay celebrate “50 Years of Excellence,” and connect to the three Phoenix Powers that Chancellor Miller presented during his Installation Speech — innovation, transformation and place. The theme should lend itself to interdisciplinary analysis and conversation, be of high academic caliber and conducive to scholarly dialogue, should lend itself to collaborative links across the campus (student affairs, academic affairs, and community engagement), and be accessible, yet potentially engaging, for students and the community. You can find past common theme topics on the Common Theme website. Proposals are due on or before April 19, 2015, and should be submitted to Associate Dean Ritch.

Reminder: UW-Green Bay and its community

A panel discussion regarding connections between UW-Green Bay and its community is planned for 7 p.m. Thursday (April 2) in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall (Mac) 210. Speakers include Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt and his chief of Staff Andy Rosendahl, Karen Faulkner of Golden House, students Sarah Wanek and Lydia Schwertfeger and Profs Regan Gurung, Katia Levintova and Alison Staudinger. The event is sponsored by the Student Government Association and UWGB’s campus Common Theme committee.

Mayor Schmitt, others join for Common Theme ‘Phoenix Talk’ on Thursday

A panel discussion regarding connections between UW-Green Bay and its community is planned for 7 p.m. Thursday, April 2 in Mary Ann Cofrin Hall (Mac) 210. Speakers include Green Bay Mayor Jim Schmitt and his chief of Staff Andy Rosendahl, Karen Faulkner of Golden House, students Sarah Wanek and Lydia Schwertfeger and Professors Regan Gurung, Katia Levintova and Alison Staudinger. The event is sponsored by the Student Government Association and UWGB’s campus Common Theme committee. Free and open to the public.

Veteran journalist to headline Dec. 4 UW-Green Bay Common Theme event

Reporting the World promotional posterAs part of its Common Theme programming, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay will present “Reporting the World: A Life of Public Engagement,” featuring veteran journalist Scott C. Johnson, from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4 in the Christie Theatre of the University Union on campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive. It is free and open to the public.

An American journalist who worked for 12 years as a Newsweek foreign correspondent, Johnson has reported from more than 50 countries and published articles on topics including Iraqi insurgents, electoral violence in Kenya and the Central American child migrant crisis. He has spent much of the last decade in the Middle East, covering the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; and in Africa, reporting on politics and current affairs. He has been the chief of Newsweek’s Mexico, Baghdad and Africa bureaus, as well as a special correspondent. Johnson was part of the team that contributed to Newsweek’s 2003 National Magazine Award for reporting on the Iraq War, and in 2004 the Overseas Press Club honored his reports on Latin America. He has appeared in various American media, including on CNN, MSNBC and National Public Radio, and his work has been featured in publications such as Granta, Guernica and National Geographic Explorer.

Johnson’s first book, a memoir titled “The Wolf and the Watchman: A Father, A Son, and the CIA” was included on the Long List for the National Book Award. UW-Green Bay’s Cofrin Library has Johnson’s book, and The Phoenix Bookstore has ordered copies, as well.

Johnson’s talk is part of the 2014-15 UW-Green Bay Common Theme, “Engaging in Public Life.” The Common Theme is a yearlong program designed to engage the campus and community in the ideals of a liberal arts education and the UW-Green Bay interdisciplinary mission. It is designed to encourage faculty, staff, students and community members to focus on a general theme from multiple perspectives and have a shared experience with open discussion and critical thinking. Past Common Themes have focused on diversity, global citizenship, creativity, sustainability and more. Additional information about the Common Theme is available at www.uwgb.edu/commontheme.

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Former ‘Newsweek’ bureau chief to talk on world’s hot spots

“Reporting the World: a Life of Public Engagement” is the title of a talk scheduled for 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4, in the Union’s Christie Theatre. Scott C. Johnson is an American journalist who worked for 12 years as a Newsweek foreign correspondent and bureau chief. He has reported from more than fifty countries and published articles on topics ranging from Iraqi insurgents and electoral violence in Kenya to the Central American child migrant crisis. Johnson’s first book, a memoir titled The Wolf and the Watchman: A Father, A Son, and the CIA, was nominated for the National Book Award. (Copies are available for loan at the Cofrin Library and sale at the Phoenix Bookstore on campus.) Johnson has spent much of the last decade in the Middle East, covering the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and in Africa, reporting on politics and current affairs. His free public presentation next Thursday was scheduled in conjunction with the University’s Common Theme for 2014-15, “Engaging in Public Life.”

Reminder: Common Theme proposals due Dec. 1

The Dec. 1 deadline to submit proposals for the 2015-16 academic year Common Theme is nearing, and the committee wants to hear from you. This year, they’re particularly interested in a theme that will help the University celebrate “50 Years of Excellence.” The theme should lend itself to interdisciplinary analysis and conversation; be of high academic caliber and conducive to scholarly dialogue; should lend itself to collaborative links across the campus (student affairs, academic affairs and community engagement); and be accessible, yet potentially engaging, for students and the community. You can find past Common Theme topics on the Common Theme website. Proposals are due on or before Monday, Dec. 1, and should be submitted to Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If you have any questions regarding the Common Theme proposals, please contact Ritch or Dean of Students Brenda Amenson-Hill.

Now seeking proposals for the next Common Theme


The UW-Green Bay Common Theme committee is requesting proposals for the 2015-16 academic year Common Theme. This year the committee is particularly interested in a theme that will help UW-Green Bay celebrate “50 Years of Excellence.” The theme should lend itself to interdisciplinary analysis and conversation, be of high academic caliber and conducive to scholarly dialogue, should lend itself to collaborative links across the campus (student affairs, academic affairs and community engagement), and be accessible, yet potentially engaging, for students and the community. You can find past common theme topics on the Common Theme website. Proposals are due on or before Sunday, Nov. 30, and should be submitted to Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. If you have any questions regarding the Common Theme proposals, please contact Ritch or Brenda Amenson-Hill.