UW-Green Bay Prof. Bob Howe is featured in Audubon Magazine

This year the lake rose again, to near-record highs. And yet, birds flourished, thanks to a project that’s rebuilding the islands. Gulls, terns, and other colonial nesters were back. So were more than 30 shorebird species, including the threatened rufa Red Knot and the endangered Piping Plover. Drawn to the newly built high ground, plovers returned in 2016 to nest in Lower Green Bay for the first time in 75 years. This past summer 15 chicks scuttled across the Cat Island sands, a promising foothold for a fragile population. ‘Frankly, I was not expecting this kind of success,’ says Prof. Bob Howe, a University of Wisconsin-Green Bay ecologist involved in the restoration. ‘The results have been nothing short of amazing.'” Read more from Audubon Magazine.

No rain, nor sleet, nor snow could stop the rice planters from succeeding

From seed handlers, to boat operators and ice breakers, to rice harvesters and transporters to the planning team, many people contributed their time and effort to a successful Green Bay wild rice seeding, even in the face of treacherous Wisconsin weather conditions bringing snow, wind, ice and sub-freezing temperatures throughout the week.

To show just how successful this wild rice seeding was, we need to get analytical for a moment. In total, 65 people participated in rice seeding throughout the week, including 20 middle-schoolers. Forty-eight bags of wild rice, weighing more than one ton, were transported and seeded and 40 acres of wetlands were seeded at seven different sites on the Green Bay west shore.

You can read more about the wild rice seeding process here.

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Egg Harbor’s PAI Opens Natural Inspiration at Kress Pavilion – Door County Pulse

The Egg Harbor Public Arts Initiative (PAI)—in collaboration with the Kress Pavilion and the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery and Cofrin Center for Biodiversity—is opening Museum of Natural Inspiration: Artists Explore the Richter Collection, an exhibition on loan from the Lawton Gallery. It will remain on display through February 2020. An opening reception with refreshments will take place Nov. 5, 4-7 pm. Dan Meinhardt, curator of UW-Green Bay’s Richter Museum of Natural History, will introduce the exhibit at 5:45 pm, and Open Door Bird Sanctuary will show live raptors, 5:30-6:30 pm, with a presentation at 6 pm. See more via Egg Harbor’s PAI Opens Natural Inspiration at Kress Pavilion – Door County Pulse.

Popular ‘Museum of Natural Inspiration’ moves to Door County Gallery

Due to the popularity of the Lawton Gallery’s first exhibition of the year, “Museum of Natural Inspiration: Artists Explore the Richter Collection,” a selection of the artwork will now be hosted at the Donald and Carol Kress Pavilion in Egg Harbor from Nov. 5, 2019 to Feb. 29, 2020. An opening reception will be held Tuesday, Nov. 5 from 4 to 7 p.m. The reception is free and open to the public, and it includes refreshments.

The Lawton exhibition was originally organized to raise awareness of the Richter Museum of Natural History, which is located on the first floor of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall.

Poster Artists Explore the Richter Collection
Poster for event

Associate Prof. Daniel Meinhardt (Human Biology and Women’s and Gender Studies), and curator of the Richter Museum, will be giving introductory remarks on the exhibit at 5:45 p.m at the opening reception. In addition, The Open Door Bird Sanctuary will have live raptors from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., with a program at 6 p.m.

 

Yarn bombing at UW-Green Bay arboretum has wacky signs of life popping up | Green Bay Press-Gazette

Take a walk on the trails of the and you’re likely to spot some of the 245-plus animals that call its 290-acres home, but that huge purple dragon up in the tree looking down at you isn’t one of them. He’s just visiting.

Amethystus the Dragon is among the whimsical flora and fauna that have popped up in the arboretum on the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus as part of a yarn bomb, curated by Prof. Alison Gates (Art and Design), on Sept. 24 and will run through Oct. 10. You’ll also bump into Coffee the Cofrin Ness Monster, jellyfish, mushrooms, spider webs, flowering vines and a red snake — all made of yarn and each the creation of a local knitter or crocheter.

Via Yarn bombing at UW Green Bay cof has wacky signs of life popping up | Green Bay Press-Gazette

Yarn Bomb

Reminder: It’s Prairie Week (and arboretum yarn bomb) and you can help

The Cofrin Center for Biodiversity is continuing its celebration of 20 years of service to the campus with several events on the Cofrin Arboretum Sept. 23-26, 2019. Much of the Arboretum and campus was originally a combination of prairie and oak savanna, a woodland habitat that included some trees and open prairie grasslands. The prairies were cleared for agriculture long before the university was built, but shortly after the university opened, restoration work began to recreate these are celebrating the prairie restoration work of UW-Green Bay faculty, staff and students that started in the early 1970s with the creation of the Keith White Prairie and in early 2000s with the restoration of two oak savanna plots. Work continues with a new oak savanna restoration in the Arboretum Gateway and continued conservation work in older prairie areas.

Thanks for celebrating with the Center for Biodiversity staff:

Monday, Sept. 23, 4 to 5 p.m., join land manager and ecologist Bobbie Webster for an afternoon walk that will take you to visit two of the current restoration areas on campus. Meet at the circle outside of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall and then walk to the Arboretum Gateway area where an old field is being restored to oak savanna. Then walk along the Arboretum trail to the Keith White Prairie to see the improvements being made through additional plantings.

Arboretum yarn bomb
“Amethystus” by alumna Dierdra Stary

Sept. 24 to Oct. 10: Take a stroll and see the Biodiversity Yarn Bomb in the Cofrin Arboretum. A yarn bomb is a form of street art where yarn creations are added to objects in the public environment. We asked local artists to consider biodiversity as the prompt for their work and Art Professor Alison Gates graciously volunteered to curate the exhibit.

Sept. 24, Restoration Workday: Noon to 3 p.m., volunteer with Biodiversity Center students and staff to help improve the Arboretum and Keith White Prairie. Activities will include invasive plant removal and planting native seedlings. Bring work gloves and water with you. Park at the South Circle Drive Arboretum kiosk near the South Nicolet Drive entrance.

Sept. 26: Bird Hike from 8 to 10 a.m. Fall Migration is in full swing and the Cofrin Arboretum is a common stopover location for migrating birds. Experts Erin Giese and Noah Nei from the Green Bay Audubon Student Conservation Chapter will lead the hike on the Arboretum trails. Bring binoculars. Meet inn the parking lot by the soccer fields just north of the S. Circle Drive/Leon Bond Drive intersection. We will hike north of the parking lot along Arboretum trails through marsh, field, pond and forested habitats in hopes of finding a variety of birds.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Arboretum Yarn Bomb

Photos by Daniel Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Next week is ‘prairie week’ and continued celebration of Center for Biodiversity’s 20 years!

The Cofrin Center for Biodiversity is continuing its celebration of 20 years of service to the campus with several events on the Cofrin Arboretum Sept. 23-26, 2019. Much of the Arboretum and campus was originally a combination of prairie and oak savanna, a woodland habitat that included some trees and open prairie grasslands. The prairies were cleared for agriculture long before the university was built, but shortly after the university opened, restoration work began to recreate these are celebrating the prairie restoration work of UW-Green Bay faculty, staff and students that started in the early 1970s with the creation of the Keith White Prairie and in early 2000s with the restoration of two oak savanna plots. Work continues with a new oak savanna restoration in the Arboretum Gateway and continued conservation work in older prairie areas.

Thanks for celebrating with the Center for Biodiversity staff:

Monday, Sept. 23, 4 to 5 p.m., join land manager and ecologist Bobbie Webster for an afternoon walk that will take you to visit two of the current restoration areas on campus. Meet at the circle outside of Mary Ann Cofrin Hall and then walk to the Arboretum Gateway area where an old field is being restored to oak savanna. Then walk along the Arboretum trail to the Keith White Prairie to see the improvements being made through additional plantings.

Sept. 24 to Oct. 10: Take a stroll and see the Biodiversity Yarn Bomb in the Cofrin Arboretum. A yarn bomb is a form of street art where yarn creations are added to objects in the public environment. We asked local artists to consider biodiversity as the prompt for their work and Art Professor Alison Gates graciously volunteered to curate the exhibit.

Sept. 24, Restoration Workday: Noon to 3 p.m., volunteer with Biodiversity Center students and staff to help improve the Arboretum and Keith White Prairie. Activities will include invasive plant removal and planting native seedlings.  Bring work gloves and water with you. Park at the South Circle Drive Arboretum kiosk near the South Nicolet Drive entrance.

Sept. 26: Bird Hike from 8 to 10 a.m. Fall Migration is in full swing and the Cofrin Arboretum is a common stopover location for migrating birds. Experts Erin Giese and Noah Nei from the Green Bay Audubon Student Conservation Chapter will lead the hike on the Arboretum trails. Bring binoculars. Location TBA: Please check back on 9/19 for location details.

Discussion Panel to replace Sept. 17 Lawton Small Talks

The Lawton Gallery would like to announce the Discussion Panel for its current exhibition Museum of Natural Inspiration: Artist’s Explore the Richter Collection. This discussion panel will focus on the topics of art and science and how they can collaborate. The panelists include select artists from the Museum of Natural Inspiration exhibition, they will be answering questions about their process and how science and art can help each other. This event will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019 from 4 to 5:30 p.m  in the Christie Theatre.

All Lawton Gallery events are free and open to the public. If you have a disability and would like to discuss accommodations, please contact the Curator of Art, Emma Hitzman at hitzmane@uwgb.edu or visit www.uwgb.edu/lawton.

#80-19

Artwork inspired by Richter Museum of Natural History is at center of Lawton Gallery exhibit, Sept. 5-Oct. 3

Green Bay, Wis.—The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Lawton Gallery announces the opening of the first exhibition of the year, “Museum of Natural Inspiration: Artists Explore the Richter Collection.”

Museum of Natural Inspiration<br /> Artists Explore the Richter Collection
Museum of Natural Inspiration
Artists Explore the Richter Collection
Sept. 5 – Oct. 3

This exhibition, in collaboration with the Center for Biodiversity’s Richter Museum of Natural History, features artists who have created artwork inspired from the Richter’s collection of specimens. These specimens will be displayed alongside the artwork they have inspired in a true partnership of art and science.

The opening reception is Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the Lawton Gallery Theatre Hall, (Room 230), UW-Green Bay and at a satellite location, Artless Bastard Gallery in De Pere, Wis. from 6 to 8 p.m.

The exhibit is part of a year-long celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Center for Biodiversity.

The exhibition will run from Sept. 5 through Oct. 3. Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. All Lawton Gallery events are free and open to the public. If you have a disability and would like to discuss accommodations, please contact Curator of Art, Emma Hitzman at hitzmane@uwgb.edu or visit the Lawton Gallery website at www.uwgb.edu/lawton.

Lawton Gallery note:
Warhol Screenprints on Loan to The River Arts Center, Prairie du Sac

The Lawton Gallery announces the loan of the Andy Warhol screenprints to the River Arts Center, located on the Wisconsin River in Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin. Nine screenprints by Warhol, donated to the University in 2008 by the Andy Warhol Foundation, will be on display from Sept. 3 to Nov. 22, 2019.  More information about the exhibition or the River Arts Center can be found on its website at www.riverartsinc.org.

For more information, contact Emma Hitzman at hitzmane@uwgb.edu.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs to nearly 8,000 students with campus locations in Green Bay, Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan. Established in 1965 on the border of Green Bay, the University and its campuses are centers of cultural enrichment, innovation and learning. The Green Bay campus is home to one of the Midwest’s most prolific performing arts centers, a nationally recognized 4,000-seat student recreation center, D-I athletics, an award-winning nine-hole golf course and a five-mile recreational trail and arboretum, which is free and open to the public. This four-campus University transforms lives and communities through student-focused teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities, powerful connections and a problem-solving approach to education. UW-Green Bay’s main campus is centrally located, close to both the Door County resort area and the dynamic economies of Northeast Wisconsin, the Fox Valley region and the I-43 corridor. UW-Green Bay offers in-demand programs in science, engineering and technology; business; health, education and social welfare; and arts, humanities and social sciences. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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