UW-Green Bay alumna opens gift shop featuring local artists from where she grew up | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

UW-Green Bay alumna Amanda Scholz ’12 (Theatre and Arts Management) recently opened a gift shop in Brown Deer, Wis. The gift shop opened in Nov. 2019, just down the street from her childhood home. More via A Brown Deer native just opened a gift shop featuring local artists down the street from where she grew up | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Path leads to Juilliard for Arts Management alumna, Hannah Claire Lewis

One of the most elusive elements of life is discovering a passion and having the moxie to pursue it. It can be a lifelong process, but one that is worth the while. For one University of Wisconsin-Green Bay alumna, it didn’t take a lifetime, but it did take some discovery.

From a UW-Green Bay undergraduate student working in the classroom to New York City raising funding for the arts, Hannah Claire Lewis has (’16, Arts Management) been on quite the journey.

Initially, Lewis began her undergraduate career with a passion for dance.

“When I was younger, it was a dream of mine to own and operate my very own dance studio,” said Lewis. “After teaching at various dance studios throughout the Green Bay area, I quickly realized that while I enjoy teaching, my passion for dance could be utilized in a capacity that did not involve running a dance studio.”

Lewis wanted a way to still be part of a community that valued her artistic roots while exploring different avenues within an arts organization. During her sophomore year at UW-Green Bay, she found that different avenue: arts administration.

Photo Credit: Maria Dalmasso
Photo Credit: Maria Dalmasso

Specifically, in a class titled, “Funding and Financial Issues in the Arts” taught by UW-Green Bay Professor of Art and Design, Ellen Rosewall, Lewis’ love for fund development was born. Lewis embraced this newfound passion, and was accepted into Indiana University’s Arts Administration Graduate Program. There she had the opportunity to serve as a teaching assistant, complete a development and special events internship at Bravo! Vail Music Festival in Colorado and serve as the development associate at the Indiana University Auditorium. “Due to the amazing mentorship of Professor Rosewall coupled with the opportunities I had to further my skills and education, I was able to land a position in my dream city so soon after graduating,” Lewis said.

That dream city is none other than New York City, where Lewis is currently completing a 10-month fellowship with The Juilliard School. As part of her fellowship, Lewis works with the Office of the Provost and Dean tacking budgets, planning events, handling correspondence with donors, and engaging with the talented classical musicians studying at Juilliard. In addition, Lewis is working on a research project with a painting donated to the school decades ago painted by George Gershwin.

Lewis’ ultimate career goal is to teach Arts Administration at a University. However, before pursuing teaching full-time, Lewis wants to work for a think tank, such as the Urban Institute.

“I am a firm believer that the field of Arts Administration needs more arts and cultural researchers,” said Lewis. “The economic standpoint of how the arts can bolster a community is important, but Arts Administrators need to understand the who’s, what’s, why’s and how’s as well.”

For instance, one question Lewis is looking to better answer is what motivates donors to donate in the performing arts. Lewis looks to seek answers to this question and many more as a member of the current generation of Arts Administrators, so this generation and the next has a better chance to succeed in the field.

Feature by Joshua Konecke, Marketing and University Communication student assistant.

Peace Cranes in Library Commons

Japanese legend and message of peace inspires UW-Green Bay student artist

Sunshine TourtillottAre you familiar with the Japanese legend of a thousand origami cranes?

The story became popular through a girl named Sadako Sasaki, who was only two years old when she became exposed to radiation due to the atomic bombing in Hiroshima during World War II. She developed leukemia at the age of 12, and began folding origami cranes while hospitalized, in hopes of making a thousand. According to the Japanese legend, anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes gets their wish granted by the gods. Sasaki was hoping for recovery.

UW-Green Bay junior Sunshine Tourtillott (Art Management & Photography) was inspired by the Japanese legend, and decided to make a 1000-piece origami crane installation.

The Oconto Falls native taught herself Origami, or the art of folding paper. Tourtillott started working on the art piece during 2018 spring semester and finished it a month after the semester was over.

“I wanted to make something hands-on, no technology. Something that would take longer than a week to make,” she says. Tourtillott purchased colored paper, some beads to put at the end of the strings so that the cranes wouldn’t fall off the strings and saved junk mail to use as paper.

“About 300 of the cranes are made of recycled paper, like Domino’s coupons,” she explains, “I was throwing away junk mail and thought, ‘wait a minute, I could use this for the cranes.’”

Originally, Tourtillott wanted to place her art piece for people to admire in the Lawton gallery in Studio Arts building. But Associate Professor Sarah Detweiler (Art) thought the piece deserved to be seen by as many as possible, and she encouraged Tourtillott to contact the personnel at the Cofrin Library. After receiving permission to hang her installation in the library, Tourtillott decided that the best place for it would be the entrance to Library Commons.

“The Cofrin Library staff loves the opportunity to showcase student art, and the Library Commons is the perfect new space to do just that,” says Assistant Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and the Cofrin Library, Paula Ganyard. “You will find student art adorning the walls throughout the library. Over the years was have added to our permanent collection and have enjoyed temporary installations like the 1000 Peace Cranes, the seven-foot cardboard monkey, the art bombs, or the larger-than-life jewelry. The Cofrin Library is a place to stimulate the intellect through more than just the books on the shelves.”

The one thousand colorful origami cranes will remain in the Library Commons until September 5, 2018.

In case you are wondering what happened to Sasaki… A popular version of the story states that she was only able to fold 644 paper cranes before she passed away. Years later, a monument was built in her honor, now known as the Children’s Peace Monument. It represents a child’s hope for world peace. Every year on August 6, children from all over the world send folded paper cranes to Sadako’s statue to keep this hope alive.

Feature story by Marketing and University Communication student employee, Roosa Turunen ’20 Business Administration.

Photos by Dan Moore, UW-Green Bay.

Making Arts Matter student organization spends time in advocacy

Students from the UW-Green Bay student organization Making Arts Matter, spent time recently in the State Capitol with Prof. Ellen Rosewall (Arts Management) talking to legislators about the value and benefit of the arts. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for the students to learn more about what’s happening in the arts in Wisconsin, to meet arts leaders and to talk with their legislators. In preparation, Anne Katz, Executive Director of Arts Wisconsin, came to visit ahead of the visit and talked with the students, giving them the basics of advocacy and what we are currently advocating for,” Rosewall said. See the full story.

Making Arts Matter student organization spends time in advocacy

Students from the UW-Green Bay student organization Making Arts Matter, spent time recently in the State Capitol with Prof. Ellen Rosewall (Arts Management) talking to legislators about the value and benefit of the arts.

Taylor Tess graphic(1)
Illustration by Taylor Tess

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for the students to learn more about what’s happening in the arts in Wisconsin, to meet arts leaders and to talk with their legislators. In preparation, Anne Katz, Executive Director of Arts Wisconsin, came to visit ahead of the visit and talked with the students, giving them the basics of advocacy and what we are currently advocating for,” Rosewall said.

Many of the students who could not attend wrote postcards and letters to elected officials. Some of the postcards the students made were for our federal officials, and Katz hand-delivered them when she attended National Arts Advocacy Day in Washington D.C.

“It was (recently) announced that Congress is proposing a $3 million increase in the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts — so the UW-Green Bay students were a part of a much larger advocacy effort that the students can see is paying off,” Rosewall said.

The students were recognized at the opening plenary (there was also a group from UW-Stevens Point) and as part of Anne Katz’s opening remarks, she shared one of the postcards drawn by UW-Green Bay student Taylor Tess. The students met with Dave Hansen, Rob Cowles, and the chief of staff for John Macco — all of them seemed impressed not only with the students but their poise and knowledge, according to Rosewall — and with the outlook for the arts in Wisconsin.

“One special thing for me was that there were several people attending Arts Day who were grads of our program and now working in arts management around the state. I asked several to join us for lunch and they talked about their jobs.” Among them: Kenzie Tresize (development and marketing associate, Wisconsin School Music Association), Kristina Coopman (program director, River Arts, Prairie du Sac), Laura Schley (Green Bay Public Art Coordinator), Staci Mincks (executive director, Mosaic Arts Inc.), Lynn Schemm (creative coordinator, Appleton Downtown) and Rose DeHut (executive director, Center for Visual Arts, Wausau). “It was so wonderful for the students to see successful alumni and hear how much they valued their time at UWGB!”

Faculty note: Ellen Rosewall appointed to journal editorial board

Ellen Rosewall (Arts Management) has been appointed to the editorial board of the Journal of Cultural Management: Science and Education, a publication of the Academic Books for Sciences and Humanities (Berlin, Germany) and University of Dabrowka Gornicza (Poland). The international editorial board includes members from the United States, Canada, the UK, Poland and Germany. Rosewall has also recently co-edited a four-volume anthology, Arts and Cultural Management: Critical and Seminal Sources, which will be published by Bloomsbury (London) in November 2018.

Mothes named interim curator and instructor

Katherine (Kate) Mothes has been hired as interim curator of the Lawton Gallery and instructor of Arts Management in Art and Design. She has a master’s degree in History of Art, Theory and Display from Edinburgh University and a bachelor’s of arts in Art History from UW-Madison. She is the founder of Young Space, a platform for emerging artists and has curated exhibits at the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Lawrence University, St. Norbert College and Madison Public Library. Mothes will be curating the Lawton Gallery as well as teaching Gallery and Museum Studies classes and supervising gallery interns.