Tag: sustainability

Wilson-Doenges talks psychology of conservation


In celebration of Earth Day, environmental psychologist Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges hosts a two-minute video with some of her students in which they talk about the role of psychology in conservation efforts. The Psychology program has a new course in Conservation Psychology and a new emphasis in Sustainability.

Next NAS seminar highlights ‘Ecological Knowledge in India”


Dr. Baisakhi Bandyopadhyay, a researcher and senior fellow of the government of India, is the next speaker in the UW-Green Bay Natural and Applied Sciences Seminar series at 3 p.m. this Friday (April 17) in Room 301 of the Environmental Sciences Building. Her topic is “The Evolution of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in India: An Overview.” She’ll discuss how ecology is addressed in India’s native communities as something that encompasses several fields including sustainable forest management, biodiversity conservation by sacred groves, sacred landscape and sacred plant species, crop management, farm management, animal management and therapeutic role of Ayurveda. Some traditional ways are seen as having great relevance for sustainable resource management. The program, which is free and open to the public, will be followed by a social at approximately 4 p.m. in ES 317.

Faculty note: Cruz talk on Tena at U of New Mexico

Marcello Cruz, associate professor of Urban and Regional Studies, gave a talk last week at the University of New Mexico on the topic of regional planning and indigenous communities in Ecuador. The talk was titled “Community and Regional Planning in Tena, Ecuador.” The presentation explored how community and regional planning using “agropolitan” approaches can provide an alternative model of community wellbeing that attempts to improve the quality of life focusing on equity, sustainability, and local community decision making among various indigenous communities residing in the region.

Food system activist Gustafson to speak Nov. 4

A sustainable food system activist, author, innovator and social entrepreneur will share her message with the campus community from 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4 in Phoenix Room B of the University Union. Ellen Gustafson’s First book, We the Eaters: If We Change Dinner, We Can Change the World, was published by Rondale Press in May 2014. She is the co-founder of Food Tank: The Food Think Tank, and founder of a small sustainable home goods company called the Apron Project. Before the launch of Food Tank, Gustafson founded The 30 Project, a campaign that has helped to change the conversation about the global food system by connecting hunger and obesity. She is also the creator of the Change Dinner campaign and HealthClass2.0, which are helping individuals change the food system at dinner tables and in schools. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

The bee’s knees: Campus keepers reap sweet rewards with harvest

UW-Green Bay student beekeepersA contingent of UW-Green Bay student beekeepers got to taste the fruits of their labor July 29, harvesting honey from two new hives located near the campus Heating and Cooling Plant Building.

The project is up and running thanks to a new student organization, the GBees, with the hives and their tenants arriving on campus this spring. The student-funded club aims to promote the environmental, biodiversity and local food aspects of beekeeping while drawing attention to the negative implications of declining honeybee numbers across the globe.

The students have gotten a hand in their endeavors from Bill Ahnen, a UW-Green Bay electrician who’s been a beekeeper for about seven years. On July 29, Ahnen took them through the harvest process, which involves removing the honeycomb, scraping off the wax covering on one side of the frame and placing it in an extractor. This centrifuge spins the honey out of the comb before the other side is scraped and extracted. The empty combs are then returned to the hive for the bees to refill.

Led by Ahnen, the student group extracted honey from 20 frames during the harvest, collecting approximately 50 pounds of honey. The beekeepers eventually hope to be able to sell their honey, perhaps alongside the University’s SLO Food Alliance during its summer vegetable sales. For now, it’s providing some industrious students a very sweet reward for their time.

— Photos by Eric Miller, Office of Marketing and University Communication

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.
UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014UW-Green Bay student beekeepers, July 2014

International water/environment seminar will meet on campus

The 17th Biennial Water Resources and Environmental Management Seminar will be hosted on the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay campus Tuesday and Wednesday (June 17 and 18).

The Water Resources and Environmental Management Seminar is an informally organized program initiated 30 years ago by a group of civil engineers (including Prof. Emeritus Jack Day) with interests in water resource and environmental management issues.  The goal was to share knowledge and promote understanding among professionals from around the world with similar interests and concerns.

Since then, approximately every two years, a seminar program has been scheduled somewhere in the world.  The agenda usually consists of two days of seminar presentations and two or more days of field trips, the latter designed to acquaint visitors with water resources and environmental management issues in the region where the seminar program is being held.

Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam; Lima, Peru; Beijing, China; and Tarragona, Spain have been sites where seminar programs have been held in recent years.  This year it is Green Bay’s turn. Prof Emeritus Day and Bob Wenger of Natural and Applied Sciences are organizers of the event.

Members of the campus community are invited to stop by Phoenix Room C and listen to any of the more than 20 talks that are scheduled on these two days between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. with lunch breaks from noon to 1 p.m..  The speakers are out-of-town visitors and local presenters, including a number of UW-Green Bay faculty members.

Tuesday, June 17

8:30               Seminar Registration

8:45               Welcome (Chancellor Tom Harden and Mayor Jim Schmitt)

9:15-9:35     John Katers (Anaerobic Digester Systems in Wisconsin)

9:35-9:55     Michael Troge (Attempting to Achieve a Truly Sustainable Plan Using the Land,

Water, and Energy Components)

9:55-10:15   Bob Howe (Measuring Ecological Health of the Great Lakes Coastal Environment)

10:15-10:30 Questions

10:30-10:45 Break

10:45-11:05 Tom Sigmund (Opportunities and Challenges at NEW WATER, Green Bay)

11:05-11:25 Rob Montgomery (Climate Change Vulnerability Analysis for the Milwaukee

Metropolitan Sewerage District)

11:25-11:45 Bill Samuels (Forecasting Time-of-Travel and Containment Levels for Emergency

Response to the West Virginia Chemical Spill)

11:45-12:00 Questions

12:00-1:00   Lunch in Phoenix Room B

1:00-1:20     Paul Sager (Estimating Improvements in Lower Green Bay through TMDL-Mandated

Phosphorus Reduction)

1:20-1:40     Val Klump (Green Bay: Dead Zones, Climate, and Its Future)

1:40-2:00    Michael Zorn ((Determination of Phosphate, Nitrate, Dissolved Oxygen, and

Temperature in Green Bay, Lake Michigan, Using High Temporal Resolution

in situ Sensors)

2:00-2:20    Jack Day (Progress in River Basin Sustainability: A Global Sample-Wisconsin, USA)
2:20-2:45    Questions

2:45-3:00    Break

3:00-3:30    Jacobo Juan Bosco Bucaram Ortiz and Napoleon Puño Lecarneque (Analysis of

Environmental Impacts of Irrigation Systems in Yaguachi Canton, Guayas Province,

Ecuador: Surface Water Gravity Flow vs. Groundwater Pumping with Diesel

Engines)

3:30-3:50    Jose De Pierola (Social Contribution of Mining through Technology Transfer in

Water Uses)

3:50-4:10    Questions

Wednesday, 18 June 2014

 8:45 am            Welcome (County Executive Troy Streckenbach, Deans Sue Mattison and Scott

Furlong)

9:15-9:35     Nancy Quirk (Green Bay Water: Past, Present, and Future)

9:35-9:55     John Luczaj (Groundwater Quality Challenges in Northeastern Wisconsin)

9:55-10:15   Ron Hunsinger (Drinking Water Quality Management)

10:15-10:30 Questions

10:30-10:45 Break

10:45-11:05 Walter Grayman (Ubiquitous Sensing of the Environment)

11:05-11:25 Dick Males (Flood Damage to Roads)

11:25-11:45 Marc Anderson (Building a Better Environment by Doing Things “Porely”)

11:45-12:00 Questions

12:00-1:00   Lunch in Phoenix Room B

1:00-1:20     Kevin Fermanich (Addressing Eutrophication Impairments in the Green Bay

Ecosystem: Research on Watersheds Vulnerable to Agricultural Runoff)

1:20-1:40     Patrick Robinson (The Story of the Green Bay Cat Island Chain)

1:40-2:00     Jessica Shultz (Coordinating Water Quality Improvement Efforts in the Lower

Fox River Watershed)

2:00-2:20     Bud Harris (Rehabilitating a Dysfunctional River/Bay System – What Have We

Learned?)

2:20-2:45     Questions

2:45-3:00     Break

3:00-3:20     Robert Clark (EPA’s Water Quality Modeling Research Program: A Historical

Perspective)

3:20-3:40     Jonathan Bulkley (Political Theory and Resource Allocation: Application to

Contemporary Environmental Challenges)

3:40-4:00     John Stoll (An Economic Perspective on Public Policy Issues)

4:00-4:15     Questions

 

 

Rental company’s ‘CarShare’ service comes to campus this fall

Being introduced to incoming students and their parents at FOCUS this year, but also available to all students, faculty and staff is the opportunity to join Enterprise CarShare. Two cars will be available in the Main housing parking lot in late August for hourly, daily and overnight rental. Supported by the campus Sustainability Committee, the program is being offered as an alternative transportation option to encourage students who may only need to use a car every once in a while to leave their car at home and it also provides options to students who don’t have a car, as well as to faculty/staff who may need a car for a quick trip in town. In order to participate you must become a member of the program. (Note that this is a personal membership and for personal use only.) A yearly membership fee is charged, along with hourly rental charges. Enterprise is currently running a promotional program that allows you to join for $10 and receive $35 in driving credits. Use Promo code: CAMPUS2014. (The introductory signup offer expires Aug. 1)

All the details of how the program works can be found at: www.enterprisecarshare.com/car-sharing/program/uwgb. Enterprise will also be funding a paid student internship position beginning in the fall to help market the program and maintain the cars. See more information on the position and an application.
 

Get paid to go green: Teach sustainable concepts, earn $250 stipend

The Environmental Sustainability committee, in collaboration with the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL), is announcing a faculty development opportunity for the 2014-15 academic year. Given that UW-Green Bay is Eco U and the new general education requirements beginning in Fall 2014 include a 3-credit sustainability component, the purpose of this opportunity is to integrate sustainability concepts in a wide variety of UW-Green Bay courses so the learning outcomes from sustainability-specific courses can be applied in courses that are not typically viewed as sustainability-related (e.g., humanities, arts, mathematics, computer science, professional programs, etc.). Participants will attend a half-day workshop in August 2014 and then implement and assess a sustainability-related activity, assignment, project, etc. in a course taught during the 2014-15 academic year. There is room for only twenty participants. If you have questions or wish to apply, contact Scott Ashmann, environmental sustainability chairperson, at ashmanns@uwgb.edu or 465-2052.

For more information, check out our full news post.

Get paid to go green: Environmental committee, CATL team to offer funds for teaching sustainability

The Environmental Sustainability committee, in collaboration with the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL), announces a faculty development opportunity for the 2014-15 academic year.

Given that UW-Green Bay is Eco U and the new general education requirements beginning in Fall 2014 include a 3-credit sustainability component, the purpose of this opportunity is to integrate sustainability concepts within a wide variety of UW-Green Bay courses so the learning outcomes from sustainability-specific courses can be applied in courses that are not typically viewed as sustainability-related (e.g., humanities, arts, mathematics, computer science, professional programs, etc.).

Ultimately, the goal is to create a critical mass of teaching faculty who integrate sustainability into at least one of their courses so that UW-Green Bay graduates will have had multiple opportunities to learn about the importance of sustainability.

  • The first part of this opportunity is to attend a half-day workshop in August 2014 (likely the morning of Thursday, Aug. 21) to enhance the teaching faculty’s understanding and skills in integrating sustainability into their courses.
  • Applicants for the workshop are encouraged to attend with another colleague from their department.
  • Individuals would be paid a stipend ($50) for attending the workshop and another stipend ($200) for planning, implementing and assessing a sustainability-related project in a 2014-15 course.
  • Eligible participants are all faculty and teaching staff who teach at least three courses within the 2014-15 academic year.
  • There is funding for only 20 participants.

During Fall 2014 or Spring 2015, each participant will develop and implement an activity, project or some other means for integrating at least one sustainability concept into one of his or her courses. The plan will be assessed through the creation of an artifact, such as examples of student work, photos, a reflective paper or similar item. To be paid the second stipend, an individual must submit documentation of planning, implementing and assessing.

If you have questions or wish to sign up, contact Scott Ashmann, environmental sustainability chairperson, at ashmanns@uwgb.edu or 465-2052.

Propane in the news

UW-Green Bay is a co-sponsor of the Heating the Midwest conference Wednesday and Thursday of this week at the Radisson Hotel & Conference Center. With the Environmental Management and Business Institute involved, there’s an emphasis on biomass as well as the recent propane shortages across the north. We expect to have news coverage in a future issue.