Tag: staff

Passing of David Watanabe

Friends of David Watanabe share word of his death recently in Bellevue, Washington following heart surgery. He was 74. Watanabe was the first campus photographer and cinematographer, joining the UW-Green Bay academic staff in 1969 after years as filmmaker at the Delaware Educational Television Network. He traveled the state with production crews from the campus Center for Television Production, shooting miles of 16-millimeter black-and-white film before electronic video production supplanted film for on-location recordings. With colleague Mike Brisson he chronicled the first half dozen years of UW-Green Bay’s history on the Shorewood campus. (Some of the images and scenes that will be viewed in our 50th anniversary slideshows and films will be Watanabe’s work.) A third-generation Japanese-American, Watanabe was born in Hawaii the year of the Pearl Harbor bombing.

UW-Green Bay student wins level in Army Reserve soldier competition


UW-Green Bay computer science student and part-time Web Services and Help Desk employee Jordan Stubblefield, a staff sergeant in the Army Reserve, is the winner of the ‘Best Warrior’ title in the 80th Training Command of the Army Reserve. Stubblefield spent Feb. 5-7 at Camp Bullis in Texas competing in a rigorous challenge for the annual title, designed to identify the best competitors from among the 6,800 soldiers within the command. The competition includes physical fitness, weapons handling, marksmanship, drill and ceremony, land navigation and a written test. Stubblefield beat out nine other non-commissioned officers to earn the title during the soldier competition. He moves on to compete in the overall U.S. Army Reserve Command’s 2015 Best Warrior Competition. See more.

Hubie Brown shoutout to Dick Bennett

There was a nice reference to UW-Green Bay and its most famous former men’s basketball coach and player on an ESPN 2 broadcast of an NBA game last week. Analyst and former coach Hubie Brown, following a promotional plug for his network’s broadcast of the big Duke-Virginia college game, added, “I’m very happy to see Virginia playing the way they’re playing now because young Bennett (Tony) is a definite clone of his dad (Dick). His father was one of the greatest college coaches ever at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and also Stevens Point and at the UW and even Washington State.” Tony Bennett’s Virginia team was No. 2 in the nation and undefeated at the time.

Campus celebrates achievements, looks to the future during Convocation

top-story-convocationFaculty, staff and friends gathered to celebrate tradition and tomorrow Jan. 22, taking part in Mid-Year Convocation in the Phoenix Room.

As is customary during the winter event, individuals celebrating service milestones were honored for anniversaries ranging from 10 years to 40. Recognized for his four decades at UW-Green Bay, event emcee Prof. Cliff Abbott drew a standing ovation as the distinction was announced.

Also as part of the ceremony, two new academic staff emeriti were honored for their service to UW-Green Bay. Gary Fewless, longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium that now bears his name; and Mike Herrity, former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser, were recognized. Neither was able to attend the event, but each received hearty applause as his citation was read.

Click here for more information about the service anniversary and emeriti honorees.

The University community also celebrated a brand-new distinction as Associate Prof. David Radosevich was formally recognized as the first-ever Austin E. Cofrin Endowed Chair of Business. The position is the University’s second endowed chair, joining the John P. Blair Endowed Chair in Communications, which was established in 2005. Click here for more on Radosevich and his honor.

Following the recognitions, Chancellor Gary L. Miller took the stage to deliver his Mid-Year Commencement remarks. The prepared text of his remarks is available here, and a summary is as follows:

 

Miller remarks: Challenges await but ‘the future is ours’

Chancellor Gary L. Miller painted a realistic yet forward-looking picture of the challenges and opportunities facing UW-Green Bay during his Mid-Year Convocation remarks Thursday, Jan. 22.

Speaking before faculty and staff members who assembled for the annual winter gathering, Miller offered updates on a variety of University activities and initiatives; addressed a bleak state budget picture; spoke about the future of shared governance and tenure; and concluded with a short-and longer-term look ahead.

“I am so excited about this place and its future,” Miller said. “The power we have to create our future through innovation, to transform the lives of many more students in this region by inviting them to join the extraordinary learning community, and to change this place to improve the human condition are limited only by our imagination. It is a great privilege to be your partner in this wonderful journey.”

Among the issues addressed:

Review of activities and initiatives

  • Miller welcomed Provost Stephen Fritz, who began his new role in January. Praising Fritz’s academic and leadership background, Miller expressed confidence in the provost’s ability to lead during what will be an important time of transition for UW-Green Bay.
  • The enrollment issue continues to be a challenge for UW-Green Bay, Miller said, but he praised progress that has been made (and thanked the majority of people present for their efforts in just a few short months) in analyzing enrollment’s effect on the budget; addressing various enrollment needs; and partnering with the Green Bay community. “We have much to do about enrollment,” Miller said, “and we’ll continue to look at this process. I’m very excited about where we are versus six months ago.”
  • Miller also addressed his “Invent the Future” transition initiative and lauded the work of faculty and staff members who comprise its steering committee and working groups. The process will conclude during spring semester, leaving leadership with “a deep catalog of innovations and recommendations upon which we can draw as we shape our future.”
  • Continuing with the theme of looking ahead, Miller spoke about the University’s new planning process, which will be guided in large part by the University Planning and Innovation Committee (UPIC). During spring semester, this group will take on an “ambitious curriculum” of learning about budgets, enrollments, the regulatory environment, athletics and other areas in an effort to inform better planning and allow the University a better strategic position in the years ahead.

The state budget

Miller offered a sobering assessment of the state budget, noting that while concrete information is lacking, the UW System is likely to face a significant and potentially painful cut during the next biennium. Even as specifics remain unknown, Miller emphasized the need for a “strong, transparent and inclusive budget reduction and reallocation process.”

That process will be spearheaded by Provost Fritz, who will organize the development of recommendations for reductions and reallocations based on advice from numerous leaders and stakeholders. The UPIC will vet those recommendations before they are submitted to the Cabinet and ultimately himself, Miller said. Regular town hall-style meetings will be held to communicate activities, answer questions and get ideas.

“The coming round of reductions,” Miller said, “will not diminish this University or alter our course to greatness.”

Shared governance and System flexibility

Shared governance and tenure are likely to be moved from state statute, Miller said, with the authority for both transferred to the UW System Board of Regents. And while he said such a move is neither optimal nor desirable, Miller reiterated his steadfast support for both provisions and expressed his confidence that the change would not diminish shared governance or threaten tenure.

“These institutions are part of the higher education systems in all 50 states,” Miller said, “and continue to survive attempts to alter or dissolve them, primarily because everyone understands they are both essential to the capacity of this great enterprise.”

The chancellor also addressed efforts to secure increased flexibility for the UW System, clarifying certain aspects of the proposal while inviting those assembled to ask questions if they seek additional information.

Additional flexibilities won’t prevent drastic state budget cuts — “the fact is, the state budget’s in extremely bad shape,” Miller said — but it will be beneficial in the long term as the Board of Regents, not the Legislature, guides UW System recovery and growth in the future. Miller is a “strong supporter” of obtaining the additional flexibilities, he said.

‘The future is ours’

Miller concluded his address on a high note, reiterating the powers of transformation, innovation and place and looking ahead to UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

“The excitement of this celebration is what will take us into the next half century,” Miller said. “The thrill of designing a future for this University. The possibility of even greater things to come. These are the things I think about every day, and when I talk to you, this is what I hear coming back from you.

“And I am so fortunate to be with you on this great journey. Let’s have a great year — it’s a New Year — and Go Phoenix!”

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Photos by Sue Bodilly, Marketing and University Communication

Employees honored for emeriti status, years of service to UW-Green Bay

Gary Fewless

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members gathered together Jan. 22 to celebrate the annual Mid-Year Convocation, a ceremony that serves as the unofficial kickoff to the University’s spring semester. The formal program included granting of emeriti status to distinguished retirees, as well as years-of-service recognition for longtime UW-Green Bay employees.

Emeritus Honorees

Two academic staff members were granted emeritus status in recognition of their service to UW-Green Bay.

Michael Herrity

Michael Herrity

Longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium — now renamed in his honor — Gary Fewless was recognized for his “unrivaled devotion to science, students and the priceless environmental diversity of our region.”

Former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser Michael Herrity was honored “for a distinguished career in service to students, community and the power of higher education.” Neither Fewless nor Herrity was able to attend, but both received generous applause as their citations were read.

Years of Service Honorees

Years-of-Service Awards, 25 years plus

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members celebrating 40-, 35- and 30-year anniversaries during Mid-Year Convocation posed for a photo at the program’s conclusion. They are (L-R) Cliff Abbott (40), Bob Howe (30), Mike Stearney (30), Dave Kieper (35) and Mark Damie (35).

Years-of-Service Awards, 20 years

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members marking 20- and 25-year anniversaries at the Jan. 22 gathering were (L-R) Jeff Benzow (25), Donna Ritch (25), Linda Toonen (25), Stephen Gering (20), Deb Anderson (25), Mike Kline (25), Dianne Gordon (25), Christine Terrien (20), Bill Hubbard (25), Sherry Lacenski (25) and Colleen Wilde (25).

Years-of-Service Awards, 10 years

Gathering for a group photo of those honored for 10-year employment anniversaries were Mary Valitchka, Bob Blihar, Diane Nagy, Eric Amenson, Bonnie Delsart, Jeff Gross, Atife Caglar, Katrina Hrivnak, Javier Martinez, Brent Blahnik, Darrel Renier, Joe Brzezinski, Judi Pietsch, Janet Reilly and Paula Marcec.

UW-Superior moves to privatize custodian, groundskeeper jobs

There was big news at the UW-Superior campus Wednesday when 27 custodians and groundskeepers learned at a morning meeting that their positions will be outsourced to Tennessee-based Services Solutions Company. UW-Superior made a similar move with bookstore employees. The move is one of many UWS is making to cover a $4.5 million shortfall caused by what administrators described as a “perfect storm” of declining enrollment, a tuition freeze and years of statewide funding reductions. For lengthy local newspaper coverage.

President Cross statement
UW System President Ray Cross issued a public statement Wednesday in regard to the announcement from UW-Superior regarding budget-reduction efforts on that campus. In part, he said, “This decision is part of a broader program prioritization effort being led by the Chancellor, one that will put the campus in a better position to serve its students in the future. By conducting a thorough review of its academic and non-academic programming, and initiating cost savings in both areas, UW-Superior is sending a strong message that it is fiscally responsible.” For the full statement.

Sights and sounds: Lambeau Field welcomes UW-Green Bay Day

Sights and sounds of UW-Green Bay DayCampus and community alike got the chance to have a blast while learning more about UW-Green Bay Nov. 15, during the first-ever UW-Green Bay Day at Lambeau Field.

Part of UW-Green Bay’s partnership with the Green Bay Packers, the event offered a little something for everyone. Eric Craver, director of external relations with UW-Green Bay’s Division of Outreach and Adult Access, talked with UW-Green Bay News about this great day in Green Bay.

Eric Craver:

“It’s the first year of UW-Green Bay Day at Lambeau Field, and this came out of a partnership between us and the Green Bay Packers.

With the partnership, our common goal is to elevate awareness of the Green Bay area for a number of different reasons. We want to increase awareness of those things that are offered at the University — not only opportunities to go and earn your degree, both as a traditional student or earn your degree online as a returning adult — but also for the many programs and services that the University has to offer.

We’ve got students here, we have alumni, we have our student-athletes here; we’ve got attractions for adults, for families, for Packer fans, for UW-Green Bay fans, and for those who just want something really cool to do on a Saturday, right here in Green Bay.

We want people to come in, we want people to say ‘hey, UW-Green Bay and the Green Bay Packers, they’re a team. They’re in this together to promote different opportunities for members of the community to come out to Lambeau Field and just have a really good time.’ So that’s the most important thing.

The other thing that I want to happen is that people find out some of the things that UW-Green Bay has to offer for members of our community, and for those who are thinking about UW-Green Bay as a destination for college. It’s a fantastic school within a fantastic University of Wisconsin System, and we’re anxious to tell you all about us.”

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.
– Photos by Dan Moore, web, marketing and data specialist, Outreach and Adult Access
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Campus, community gather for dialogue on Islam and inclusivity

top-muslim-postMore than 100 people packed the Richard Mauthe Center on the UW-Green Bay campus Thursday (Oct. 30) evening, gathering for a community meal and dialogue designed to combat stereotypes and promote inclusivity.

“Islam awareness: A conversation about Islam, the Muslim Student Association and inclusivity at UW-Green Bay” was organized in response to a recent well-publicized exchange involving UW-Green Bay alumna Heba Mohammad ’14 and Green Bay Alderman Chris Wery. Mohammad had emailed Wery to inquire about free bus service on Election Day, and he responded by questioning the Muslim Student Association she founded and asking whether she condemns Islamic terrorism. Wery, who was not in attendance Thursday, has since apologized to Mohammad and said he will meet with the association’s faculty advisers. Still, organizers said, the exchange demonstrates the need for greater education around Islam and the MSA.

“This event provided a tremendous opportunity for education and positive dialogue around Islam specifically and the importance of inclusivity generally,” said UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Heidi Sherman, co-director of the University’s Center for Middle East Studies and Partnerships and co-faculty adviser for the UW-Green Bay MSA.

The evening kicked off with a Somali dinner at 6 p.m., which was followed by the full program at 6:30. Mohammad Rashid, president of the Fox Valley Islamic Society, delivered the evening’s keynote address, speaking from the heart about his faith and its tradition of peace. He read from the Quran and the Hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammad), and also offered historical perspective on Islam.

Muslims often are the victims of guilt by association, Rashid said, as people confuse what is fundamentally a peaceful religion with the acts of radicals who claim the faith as a justification for their actions.

“I ask you to look beyond it — what are the facts?” he said. “I would like to have a dialogue with that alderman who made those comments to Heba. I’m, at heart, a citizen of America. I love this country.”

Later in the program, Mohammad and Sherman joined Rashid for a panel discussion in which they accepted oral and written questions from the audience. The trio addressed a variety of queries ranging from the basics — prayer five times a day — to addressing stereotypes and discrimination.

“The religion I know, the religion I practice,” Rashid said, “… My religion tells you even not to offend somebody with my words. It is that careful. … That is the religion of Islam.”

In the age of social media, Mohammad added, it’s easy for people to hide behind negative comments made online.

“If you have a question about any culture,” she said, “I highly recommend you get to know someone (from that background).”

The evening also featured a discussion on inclusivity, and a presentation from Residence Life’s Quin Merriweather and University Police Officer Cristey Johnson on UW-Green Bay’s participation in national Stop the Hate programming.

As the panel discussion wound to a close, Rashid told attendees about the Islamic Society’s ultimately successful efforts, some 30 years ago, to build a mosque in Neenah. The group met with initial opposition, he said, but education and dialogue ultimately prevailed.

“The neighbors who opposed our mosque are good friends now,” Rashid said. “They all became very good friends.”

Faculty/staff note: Jones on tourniquets

David Jones, a police officer and emergency management coordinator with UW-Green Bay Public Safety, is the author of an article in the professional journal The Police Marksman. In the article, titled “Combat Application Tourniquet,” Jones writes about the change in attitude regarding the use of tourniquets to stop blood loss from extremity wounds in military combat or law enforcement situations. (Military experts now say tourniquets can be effective for as long as two hours without causing their own damage, allowing more victims to survive and be transported for medical treatment.) Jones, who has extensive defense department and law enforcement experience, joined the UW-Green Bay force in the last year.