Employees honored for emeriti status, years of service to UW-Green Bay

Gary Fewless

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members gathered together Jan. 22 to celebrate the annual Mid-Year Convocation, a ceremony that serves as the unofficial kickoff to the University’s spring semester. The formal program included granting of emeriti status to distinguished retirees, as well as years-of-service recognition for longtime UW-Green Bay employees.

Emeritus Honorees

Two academic staff members were granted emeritus status in recognition of their service to UW-Green Bay.

Michael Herrity
Michael Herrity

Longtime lecturer and curator of the University Herbarium — now renamed in his honor — Gary Fewless was recognized for his “unrivaled devotion to science, students and the priceless environmental diversity of our region.”

Former UW-Green Bay Registrar and academic adviser Michael Herrity was honored “for a distinguished career in service to students, community and the power of higher education.” Neither Fewless nor Herrity was able to attend, but both received generous applause as their citations were read.

Years of Service Honorees

Years-of-Service Awards, 25 years plus

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members celebrating 40-, 35- and 30-year anniversaries during Mid-Year Convocation posed for a photo at the program’s conclusion. They are (L-R) Cliff Abbott (40), Bob Howe (30), Mike Stearney (30), Dave Kieper (35) and Mark Damie (35).

Years-of-Service Awards, 20 years

UW-Green Bay faculty and staff members marking 20- and 25-year anniversaries at the Jan. 22 gathering were (L-R) Jeff Benzow (25), Donna Ritch (25), Linda Toonen (25), Stephen Gering (20), Deb Anderson (25), Mike Kline (25), Dianne Gordon (25), Christine Terrien (20), Bill Hubbard (25), Sherry Lacenski (25) and Colleen Wilde (25).

Years-of-Service Awards, 10 years

Gathering for a group photo of those honored for 10-year employment anniversaries were Mary Valitchka, Bob Blihar, Diane Nagy, Eric Amenson, Bonnie Delsart, Jeff Gross, Atife Caglar, Katrina Hrivnak, Javier Martinez, Brent Blahnik, Darrel Renier, Joe Brzezinski, Judi Pietsch, Janet Reilly and Paula Marcec.

UW-Superior moves to privatize custodian, groundskeeper jobs

There was big news at the UW-Superior campus Wednesday when 27 custodians and groundskeepers learned at a morning meeting that their positions will be outsourced to Tennessee-based Services Solutions Company. UW-Superior made a similar move with bookstore employees. The move is one of many UWS is making to cover a $4.5 million shortfall caused by what administrators described as a “perfect storm” of declining enrollment, a tuition freeze and years of statewide funding reductions. For lengthy local newspaper coverage.

President Cross statement
UW System President Ray Cross issued a public statement Wednesday in regard to the announcement from UW-Superior regarding budget-reduction efforts on that campus. In part, he said, “This decision is part of a broader program prioritization effort being led by the Chancellor, one that will put the campus in a better position to serve its students in the future. By conducting a thorough review of its academic and non-academic programming, and initiating cost savings in both areas, UW-Superior is sending a strong message that it is fiscally responsible.” For the full statement.

Sights and sounds: Lambeau Field welcomes UW-Green Bay Day

Sights and sounds of UW-Green Bay DayCampus and community alike got the chance to have a blast while learning more about UW-Green Bay Nov. 15, during the first-ever UW-Green Bay Day at Lambeau Field.

Part of UW-Green Bay’s partnership with the Green Bay Packers, the event offered a little something for everyone. Eric Craver, director of external relations with UW-Green Bay’s Division of Outreach and Adult Access, talked with UW-Green Bay News about this great day in Green Bay.

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Eric Craver:

“It’s the first year of UW-Green Bay Day at Lambeau Field, and this came out of a partnership between us and the Green Bay Packers.

With the partnership, our common goal is to elevate awareness of the Green Bay area for a number of different reasons. We want to increase awareness of those things that are offered at the University — not only opportunities to go and earn your degree, both as a traditional student or earn your degree online as a returning adult — but also for the many programs and services that the University has to offer.

We’ve got students here, we have alumni, we have our student-athletes here; we’ve got attractions for adults, for families, for Packer fans, for UW-Green Bay fans, and for those who just want something really cool to do on a Saturday, right here in Green Bay.

We want people to come in, we want people to say ‘hey, UW-Green Bay and the Green Bay Packers, they’re a team. They’re in this together to promote different opportunities for members of the community to come out to Lambeau Field and just have a really good time.’ So that’s the most important thing.

The other thing that I want to happen is that people find out some of the things that UW-Green Bay has to offer for members of our community, and for those who are thinking about UW-Green Bay as a destination for college. It’s a fantastic school within a fantastic University of Wisconsin System, and we’re anxious to tell you all about us.”

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.
– Photos by Dan Moore, web, marketing and data specialist, Outreach and Adult Access
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Campus, community gather for dialogue on Islam and inclusivity

top-muslim-postMore than 100 people packed the Richard Mauthe Center on the UW-Green Bay campus Thursday (Oct. 30) evening, gathering for a community meal and dialogue designed to combat stereotypes and promote inclusivity.

“Islam awareness: A conversation about Islam, the Muslim Student Association and inclusivity at UW-Green Bay” was organized in response to a recent well-publicized exchange involving UW-Green Bay alumna Heba Mohammad ’14 and Green Bay Alderman Chris Wery. Mohammad had emailed Wery to inquire about free bus service on Election Day, and he responded by questioning the Muslim Student Association she founded and asking whether she condemns Islamic terrorism. Wery, who was not in attendance Thursday, has since apologized to Mohammad and said he will meet with the association’s faculty advisers. Still, organizers said, the exchange demonstrates the need for greater education around Islam and the MSA.

“This event provided a tremendous opportunity for education and positive dialogue around Islam specifically and the importance of inclusivity generally,” said UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Heidi Sherman, co-director of the University’s Center for Middle East Studies and Partnerships and co-faculty adviser for the UW-Green Bay MSA.

The evening kicked off with a Somali dinner at 6 p.m., which was followed by the full program at 6:30. Mohammad Rashid, president of the Fox Valley Islamic Society, delivered the evening’s keynote address, speaking from the heart about his faith and its tradition of peace. He read from the Quran and the Hadith (sayings of the Prophet Muhammad), and also offered historical perspective on Islam.

Muslims often are the victims of guilt by association, Rashid said, as people confuse what is fundamentally a peaceful religion with the acts of radicals who claim the faith as a justification for their actions.

“I ask you to look beyond it — what are the facts?” he said. “I would like to have a dialogue with that alderman who made those comments to Heba. I’m, at heart, a citizen of America. I love this country.”

Later in the program, Mohammad and Sherman joined Rashid for a panel discussion in which they accepted oral and written questions from the audience. The trio addressed a variety of queries ranging from the basics — prayer five times a day — to addressing stereotypes and discrimination.

“The religion I know, the religion I practice,” Rashid said, “… My religion tells you even not to offend somebody with my words. It is that careful. … That is the religion of Islam.”

In the age of social media, Mohammad added, it’s easy for people to hide behind negative comments made online.

“If you have a question about any culture,” she said, “I highly recommend you get to know someone (from that background).”

The evening also featured a discussion on inclusivity, and a presentation from Residence Life’s Quin Merriweather and University Police Officer Cristey Johnson on UW-Green Bay’s participation in national Stop the Hate programming.

As the panel discussion wound to a close, Rashid told attendees about the Islamic Society’s ultimately successful efforts, some 30 years ago, to build a mosque in Neenah. The group met with initial opposition, he said, but education and dialogue ultimately prevailed.

“The neighbors who opposed our mosque are good friends now,” Rashid said. “They all became very good friends.”

Faculty/staff note: Jones on tourniquets

David Jones, a police officer and emergency management coordinator with UW-Green Bay Public Safety, is the author of an article in the professional journal The Police Marksman. In the article, titled “Combat Application Tourniquet,” Jones writes about the change in attitude regarding the use of tourniquets to stop blood loss from extremity wounds in military combat or law enforcement situations. (Military experts now say tourniquets can be effective for as long as two hours without causing their own damage, allowing more victims to survive and be transported for medical treatment.) Jones, who has extensive defense department and law enforcement experience, joined the UW-Green Bay force in the last year.

In a fog

fog
Just after sunrise, early arrivals to the UW-Green Bay campus on Wednesday, Oct. 22, were treated to the ethereal but ephemeral sight of scattered pockets of fog resting lightly upon a landscape bright with fall colors. This view is from the eighth floor of the Cofrin Library, looking out toward the Weidner Center (and the bay of Green Bay, hidden behind a fog bank.) The scene above was captured via smart phone by University Advancement Office staff member Liz Teubert.

Another eighth-floor colleague, Holly Keener of the Academic Affairs Office, captured the photos below that same morning. (Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 Sunrise on UW-Green Bay campus, October 22, 2014  Sunrise on UW-Green Bay campus, October 22, 2014  Sunrise on UW-Green Bay campus, October 22, 2014

UW-Green Bay to host November ‘Phoenix Talks,’ modeled after popular TEDx series

UW-Green Bay will present a series of public discussions modeled after the popular TEDx Talks series, Nov. 3-6 in the Christie Theatre of the University Union.

Dubbed “Phoenix Talks,” each of these events will feature three engaging community leaders — most of whom are UW-Green Bay alumni — who will discuss their careers and answer the question, “Why have you chosen to devote your life to public service?” The talks are presented as part of the 2014-15 UW-Green Bay Common Theme, “Engaging in Public Life.”

The discussions, which run from 11 a.m. to noon, are free and open to the public. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to attend.

Each Phoenix Talk event will focus around a theme. A complete list of topics and speakers is as follows:

Monday, Nov. 3 — Public education

Nick Nesvacil ’07, special education teacher, Green Bay Preble High School

Jo Weibel ’97, principal, Edison Middle School (Green Bay)

Jenny Wassenberg ’98 and ’03, teacher, Phantom Knight School of Opportunity (West De Pere)

Tuesday, Nov. 4 — Nonprofits

Sara Bruesewitz ’12, development, American Red Cross

Nicole Hoffman ’99, vice president of development, ASPIRO

Sarah Inman ’92, vice president of community impact, United Way

Wednesday, Nov. 5 — Environmental issues and causes

Crystal Osman ’08, Downtown Green Bay, Inc. and Olde Main Street, Inc.

Ned Dorff, teacher and activist, Leonardo da Vinci School for Gifted Learners

TBA

Thursday, Nov. 6 — City government and politics

Jim Schmitt, mayor, city of Green Bay

Dan Lindstrom ’07, Green Bay City Planning Department

TBA

 

Power of partnership: Phoenix Athletics, Prevea make a winning team

top-story-partnershipJeremy Cleven (pictured) head athletics trainer for the Phoenix, is far from alone in his work despite being the only sports medicine professional formally employed by UW-Green Bay.

Take, for example, his colleague Callie Bartel, who has long been steeped in the culture and camaraderie of Phoenix Athletics at UW-Green Bay.

She’s an alumna who ran cross country with the Phoenix before graduating with a degree in Human Biology in 2009. Each day, she reports to her on-campus office and then sets about her day as an athletic trainer, working with student-athletes who want to stay at — or return to — the top of their game.

But Bartel isn’t a University employee. Rather, she’s part of an innovative partnership with Prevea Sports Medicine, a program that provides athletic trainers who are contracted out to UW-Green Bay.

“I knew I wanted to work at the college level right away,” Bartel said. “I wanted those athletes — they were there for a reason, and if they got hurt, they were going to do whatever it takes to get better.”

The partnership allows Bartel and her fellow athletic trainers — Prevea provides two others, plus two strength coaches — to work full-time with Cleven, who is employed by UW-Green Bay. It also provides Phoenix athletes with quick access to Prevea physicians as they need it, offering another big-time benefit for Division I athletes who just want to play — and play healthy.

“The community relationships are something that have really been important to them, and they have a passion for sports medicine,” Cleven said. “It’s kind of in their blood to take care of the local college athletes.”

Prevea is pleased to partner with a great University and the only Division I school in Northeastern Wisconsin, said Michael LaMere, Prevea’s Sports Medicine Outreach Supervisor. Its athletic trainers attend continuing education courses year-round to stay abreast of current trends, and the athletic training team meets frequently to review emergency and rehabilitation protocols to make sure athletes receive the highest level of care possible.

“The athletic trainers are the first line of defense of making sure the athlete is taken care of in a safe and timely manner,” LaMere said. “From a minor injury to a life-threatening injury, the athletic trainers are equipped to manage every situation that is thrown their way. With an athletic trainer on the sidelines, it helps give the student-athletes and coaches the peace of mind that they have someone right there with knowledge and skill to take care of injuries that may happen.”

UW-Green Bay’s longstanding relationship with Prevea is reflected not only on the sidelines of games and practices, but also in the very name of its training room — the Hinckley Sports Medicine Center on the lower level of the Kress Events Center on campus. The room is named after Prevea orthopedic surgeon, longtime team physician and UW-Green Bay philanthropist Dr. James Hinckley, who with his late wife Patricia received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in 2012.

The partnership also played a significant role in Bartel’s transition from student-athlete to athletic trainer. While a Phoenix cross country runner, Bartel established relationships with Cleven and then-UW-Green Bay athletic trainer Emily (Meeuwsen) Johnson, daughter of current UW-Green Bay Trustee Kate Meeuwsen ’76. The pair mentored Bartel and helped her land an internship with Prevea and UW-Green Bay between her first and second year of graduate school. It’s yet another example of how a longstanding partnership has paid off — for everyone involved.

“Callie’s experience has really brought a unique outlook to our sports medicine staff,” LaMere said. “Being a UWGB athlete, she came into the position with more knowledge of the University, the Athletic Department and Prevea than most would. Knowing the ins and outs really helped her hit the ground running quickly.

“Callie has always known she wanted to work with athletes, and it is great that she can continue what she started at UWGB.”

UW-Green Bay Public Safety issues statements on reported campus assaults

UW-Green Bay Public Safety officers are investigating a pair of reported on-campus assaults they believe are likely related. The following statement is the most recent from campus Police Chief Tom Kujawa, sent to students, faculty and staff on the afternoon of Friday, Sept. 12. It is followed by an initial notification statement, sent Monday evening, Sept. 5, also to students, faculty and staff.

Friday, Sept. 12:

Second student comes forward with assault report

Members of the Campus Community –

As UW-Green Bay Public Safety continues to pursue possible leads into an alleged assault on campus, we have now learned of a second and likely related incident.

In our all-campus notification this past Monday (Sept. 8), we alerted you that a female student had reported that a male approached and grabbed her as she was returning to her car in the Wood Hall Parking Lot at about 2:15 that afternoon. The suspect was described as a white male, 5 feet 10 inches tall with a medium build and wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and light colored cargo shorts.

Today, we have additional news to share regarding another incident that happened almost a week ago which was reported to us last night.

A female student told us she had been assaulted one week ago by a male suspect in an incident when she was leaving campus last Friday (Sept. 5). The suspect held the door open for her as she left from MAC Hall at about 2:00 p.m., and walked with her until they reached the tennis courts adjacent to the Kress Events Center. The female student reported unwanted touching of a sexual nature, over her clothes which lasted for several seconds.  The man left when she yelled. The suspect was  described as a white male between 5” feet 8” to 5’ 10” tall, medium or average build, razor stubble and dark colored hair.  Suspect was reportedly wearing a gray t-shirt, tan colored shorts and may have been carrying a black backpack.

Officers have been following a number of leads as part of this investigation. They have learned of an alleged incident that took place at about 12:20 a.m. Saturday (Sept. 6)  outside Robishaw Hall in the campus housing complex. A female student reported a male tried starting a conversation with her and grabbed her arm, before she quickly broke away. It is unclear if this case is related to the other two incidents.

Anyone who may have information on the suspect or suspects, or who may have witnessed the alleged incidents, is asked to call Public Safety at (920) 465-2300. Thank you for your cooperation.

Additionally, I appreciate the interest and concern expressed about these reports not only by students, but by their families, all members of the campus community, and our larger community. I note that assault is a matter that deeply affects both victims and the community, and remind you that those seeking additional support should know it is always just a phone call away:

Public Safety-465-2300 (24 hrs)

Sexual Assault Center-436-8899 (24 hrs)

Counseling and Health-465-2380

Dean of Students Office-465-2152

 

Tom Kujawa

Police Chief

 

——-

 

Monday, Sept. 5:

Members of the Campus Community –

UW-Green Bay Public Safety is investigating a report received this evening of an alleged assault in the Wood Hall Parking Lot. A female student reported that a male approached and grabbed her at about 2:15 p.m. today (Monday, Sept. 8) as she was walking to her car in the Wood Hall lot. The suspect is described as a white male, 5 feet 10 inches tall with a medium build and wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and light colored cargo shorts.

Anyone who may have information on the suspect, or who may have witnessed the alleged incident, is asked to call Public Safety at (920) 465-2300. Thank you for your cooperation in this matter.

Tom Kujawa

Police Chief