Tag: natural and applied sciences

Faculty note: Grubisha publication

Lisa Grubisha, Assistant Professor of Biology in the Department of Natural and Applied Sciences, has published the paper “Genetic Analysis of the Aspergillus flavus Vegetative Compatibility Group to Which a Biological Control Agent That Limits Aflatoxin Contamination in U.S. Crops Belongs” in the September issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(17): 5889-5899 (http://aem.asm.org/content/81/17/5889.full ).

Faculty note: Dalke and Hunt presentation on mustangs vs domestics

Karen Dalke, lecturer in Public and Environmental Affairs recently presented a co-authored article with Megan Olson Hunt, assistant professor of Natural and Applied Sciences, titled “Mustangs and Domestic Horses: Examining What We Think We Know About Differences.” The presentation was made at the International Society for Anthro-zoology in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Using the United States Geographical Survey (USGS) ethogram for Free-Roaming Feral Horses, this study examines behaviors of Bureau of Land Management mustangs and domestic horses. Over 26,000 behavioral images were analyzed and sorted into 15 categories. Continuous focal sampling at one-minute intervals captured behaviors for six equids over a one-month period. Results suggest that over time, mustangs behave similarly to fully domesticated horses, indicating that adoption is a feasible option for America’s thousands of wild mustangs.

Faculty note: Currier publication on magmatic mechanics

Assistant Prof. Ryan Currier of Natural and Applied Sciences has received word his paper will be published in the September 2015 issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. The paper “Mapping real time growth of experimental laccoliths: The effect of solidification on the mechanics of magmatic intrusion” is the first publication based on experiments performed at UWGB, some with students. The main driver of this research is that magma chambers form inside the crust, and are not typically directly observed. Even the old, cold magma chambers that are now exposed at the surface are difficult to study in full. In Currier’s experiments, he created scaled-down magmatic intrusions (using molten wax as magma and gelatin as crust) to observe how magma chambers grow through time. The results could be helpful in developing new field studies of ancient magma chambers.

Dornbush accepts post in academic affairs, grants, grad studies

post-dornbushProf. Mathew E. Dornbush is joining the academic affairs administrative team at UW-Green Bay as the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Professional Development and Grants, and Director of Graduate Studies.

He will report to Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Gregory Davis, who announced the appointment this week. Dornbush will begin his new duties Aug. 24.

Dornbush is a professor of biology with the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit who currently serves as chairman of UW-Green Bay’s interdisciplinary master’s degree program in Environmental Science and Policy. He has taught at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

In his new role, Dornbush will provide leadership for the Office of Grants and Research, the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, and the Office of Graduate Studies, with the latter expected to be an area of emphasis with strategic planning and new recruitment/marketing initiatives. Additionally, he will take a lead role in promoting undergraduate student research and serve as a liaison to the University’s Institutional Research Board and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.

The position represents a reshaping of the administrative post left vacant earlier this summer by the retirement of Daniel McCollum, whose title was assistant vice chancellor for academic administration.

Dornbush earned promotion to the highest faculty rank, full professor, this past June. The promotion came only a decade after he earned his doctoral degree in ecology at Iowa State University and joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2005. Along with his graduate-program experience as chairman of ES&P, Dornbush has been successful in winning outside grants to support his scientific research. His primary interests involve the role of native plant restorations in improving ecosystems. He has received state and federal grants for projects ranging from the potential use of native tallgrass for bio-energy purposes to the restoration of wild rice, bulrush and wild celery stands in the lower bay.

Ribble pushes federal legislation to target ‘dead zones’

U.S. Representative Reid Ribble is a sponsor of H.R. 3120, the Great Lakes Assurance Program Verification Act of 2015, a bill he says would help equip farmers to reduce excess nutrient loading that has seen water bodies including the Bay of Green Bay suffer seasonal “dead zones.” H.R. 3120 would create an initiative for states in the Great Lakes Basin to establish “innovative, proactive programs that help farms of all sizes and all commodities to prevent or minimize agricultural pollution risks.” Ribble has hosted a series of listening sessions and stakeholder meetings prompted in part by highly publicized research – some of it involving UW-Green Bay faculty, students and alumni – showing phosphorous-laden runoff is causing algae blooms and oxygen problems in the bay. If you’re interested in the topic, the Wisconsin State Farmer news site had an ag-centric view of Ribble’s project posted online. The piece quotes experts including local dairyman Gordon Spiers and UWGB watershed specialist Prof. Kevin Fermanich of Natural and Applied Sciences.

Seven earn promotion to full professor

The UW System Regents also approved moving the following individuals from associate professor to the senior rank of full professor:

Lucy Arendt, Business Administration
Mathew Dornbush, Natural and Applied Sciences
Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Nursing
Catherine Henze, Humanistic Studies
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences
Bryan Vescio, Humanistic Studies
Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences.

Our news release includes a short bio on each of this year’s faculty members advancing to full-professor status.

Miller appointment in NAS

In approving the statewide slate of faculty promotions, the UW System Board of Regents took action Friday to ratify the concurrent appointment of Gary L. Miller — who joined UW-Green Bay as chancellor last Aug. 1 — as a full professor with tenure in the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit. Miller was a professor of ecology with the University of Mississippi prior to entering academic administration on a full-time basis.

Profs. Currier and Luczaj and students take research on the road

UWGB Professors Ryan Currier and John Luczaj of Natural and Applied Sciences along with 12 students attended the North Central Section of the Geological Society of America meeting in Madison at the end of May. Summaries of the presentations are linked, below. Three of the students presented posters related to their own classwork with Prof. Currier:

Undergraduate Student (Geoscience Major) Zach Ashauer: “The Lashly Mountains of Southern Victorialand, Antarctica: Investigating a Possible Ancient Volcano.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255474.html (independent research).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Sarah Faga: “Using GIS to Uncover the Link Between Radon Potential and Geology in Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper256015.html (master’s thesis).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Brian Yagle: “Experiments on the Evolution of Laccolith Morphology: The Maturation from Elliptical to Circular Shaped Intrusions.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255751.html (Capstone in Environmental Science Course). Most of the data for the poster were collected by students as part of a student-based research project in the class. Coauthors were Dr. Patrick Forsythe (the lead instructor for the course) and Yagle.

In addition, Prof. Luczaj, who serves as UWGB’s Geoscience Chair, gave an oral presentation, “Modern Aquifer Chemistry as a Function of Water-Rock Interaction: A Case Example from Eastern Wisconsin.”

UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary will feature faculty lecture series

The lineup is set for the UW-Green Bay 50th Anniversary “Last Lecture Series” for the 2015-16 academic year. Each presentation is a Wednesday event beginning at 7 p.m. in the Union’s Christie Theatre.

The lineup of distinguished faculty lecturers:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit”