Tag: iPat Film Series

Aldo Leopold documentary is iPat film this Tuesday

The iPat environmental film series is back with “Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time” at 7 p.m. Tuesday (March 3) in the Christie Theatre. The film explores Leopold’s thinking, renewing his idea of a land ethic for a population facing 21st century ecological challenges. After the showing, Tom Bolt, past chair of the Aldo Leopold Foundation, will lead discussion. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. All showings are free and open to the public — and free popcorn will be available. Questions? Contact Ashley Heath (heatha@uwgb.edu) or Rachel Russell (russellr@uwgb.edu).

USDA soil scientist will join us for ‘Dirt! The Movie’

The iPat environmental film series resumes with “Dirt! The Movie” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, in the Christie Theatre. The film looks at man’s relationship with dirt, and the connection that has been lost over time. After the screening, guest speaker Phil Meyer, area resource soil scientist for USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, will lead the discussion. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. All showings are free and open to the public, with free popcorn, to boot. Read more.
 

iPat film series returns with look at computer-disposal hazards

The iPat environmental film series is back with “Terra Blight” at 7 p.m. next Tuesday (Nov. 4) in the Christie Theatre. “Terra Blight” is a documentary that explores America’s consumption of computers and other hazardous waste created in the pursuit of the latest and greatest technology. After the showing, specialists Chris Blan of Brown County Solid Waste and Marcy McGrath of the state DNR will lead discussion. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. All showings are free and open to the public — and free popcorn will be available.

iPat film series is back for Fall

The iPat environmental film series will kick off the Fall semester with “Waterlife” at 7 p.m. Tuesday (October 7th) in the Christie Theatre. The documentary investigates water’s journey from the streams that enter Lake Superior to the mouth of the Saint Lawrence Seaway, a process that takes 350 years. It stresses the importance of the Great Lakes, and focuses on environmental problems along the journey. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. Click here to view the full schedule for Fall 2014. All showings are free and open to the public — and free popcorn will be available. Questions? Contact Ashley Heath (heatha@uwgb.edu).
 

iPat Film Series: ‘A Fierce Green Fire,’ Tuesday night

The people from the iPAT film series welcome you to the Christie Theatre for their final film of the semester at 7 p.m. Tuesday (April 1). “A Fierce Green Fire” is billed as an inspiring historical overview of the environmental movement and is helped along by narration from Robert Redford, Ashley Judd, Meryl Streep and others. The title has some Wisconsin roots, having emerged from Aldo Leopold’s story of shooting a wolf and seeing a “fierce green fire” in its dying eyes. Eric Morgan, Democracy and Justice Studies, will be on hand to lead the post-film discussion and highlight the relevance of this film for our local community. The iPat series is free and open to the public – and free popcorn will be provided! Questions? Contact Ashley Heath: 465-2608 or heatha@uwgb.edu. For more information on the film, see: www.afiercegreenfire.com.

iPat Film Series: Do The Math, Tuesday at 7

It’s the next installment of the iPat series: Do The Math is a fast-paced documentary about the rising movement to take on the fossil fuel industry and address growing climate concerns. Whitney Passint, UW Green Bay graduate student, will be on hand to offer local commentary about this issue after the film. The iPat series is free and open to the public — and free popcorn will be provided! Visit the website for more information. Questions? Contact Ashley Heath: 465-2608 or heatha@uwgb.edu.

Clarification on Tuesday’s iPAT movie: Topic will be ozone hole response

The iPat environmental film series kicks off the spring semester with “Shattered Sky” at 7 p.m. Tuesday (Feb. 4) in the Christie Theatre. Our earlier post mis-stated the subject matter. In fact, the documentary tells the story of how America led the world to address the hole in the ozone layer. Guest commentator for after the film is Michael Grimm, conservation ecologist with the Nature Conservancy of Door Peninsula & Green Bay Watershed.
 

iPat film series is back for spring!

The iPat environmental film series will kick of the spring semester with “Shattered Sky” at 7 p.m. Tuesday (Feb. 4) in the Christie Theatre. The documentarytells the story of hownAmerica led the world to solve what some believe the biggest environmental crisis ever seen — the hole in the ozone layer. Guest commentator for after the film is Michael Grimm, conservation ecologist with the Nature Conservancy of Door Peninsula & Green Bay Watershed. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. All showings are free and open to the public — and free popcorn will be available! To see the spring schedule.

Wolf and ‘Honey’ of a movie at environmental films series tonight

Bee researcher and Associate Prof. of Natural and Applied Sciences Amy Wolf will be the guest speaker tonight (Tuesday, Dec. 3) at 7 p.m. in the Christie Theatre. She’ll offer a short summary and local perspective on the latest installment in the iPAT film series, “More Than Honey.” The documentary looks into the fascinating world of bees, showing small family beekeepers and industrialized honey farms, and suggests that crises and disasters are triggering evolution. Admission is free (and free popcorn will be served). More details.
 

‘Trashed’ is next up on iPat film series

The iPat environmental film series resumes with “Trashed” at 7 p.m. Tuesday (Nov. 5) in the Christie Theatre. The documentary travels around the world with guide Jeremy Irons to visit once-beautiful landscapes and waterfronts spoiled by landfills and pollution. The iPat Film Series (impact = population * affluence * technology) is sponsored by PEAC, The Center for Public Affairs, and the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs. Free and open to the public.