Tag: Human Development

Congratulations to faculty members on 2018-19 sabbaticals

Sabbatical proposals have been approved by the Board of Regents. Sabbaticals are covered in Wisconsin State Statute (Wis. Stat. 36.11(17)), in UW System Policy (UW System Administrative Policy 160) and in the Faculty Handbook (pp. 128-9). Congratulations to the following faculty members who are receiving sabbaticals in 2018-19: Associate Prof. Francis Akakpo, Social Work, semester […]

Holstead awarded large contract to facilitate data collection for after-school programs

Associate Prof. Jenell Holstead (Human Development and Psychology), has been awarded a $220,000 contract to facilitate the implementation of a statewide data collection and evaluation system for 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) after-school programs. Holstead will oversee training and technical assistance to approximately 75 after-school programs throughout the state between January 2018 and June […]

Faculty notes: Kate Burns gives Dos and Dont’s of resolution-making in Wallet Hub

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Kate Burns (Women’s and Gender Studies and Human Development) shares some Dos and Don’ts of resolution making with Wallet Hub readers. For example, “frame resolutions in a positive way.” “I will eat more fruits and vegetables.”

Prof. Gurung wish for grads: ‘May your life be epic’

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Regan A. R. Gurung is an award-winning professor of human development and psychology at UW-Green Bay. His research focuses on questions surrounding teaching and learning as well as on clothing and perception and the role of culture and health. Gurung joined the University in 1999, and has held the prestigious Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg […]

Trunk of treasure reveals a family’s past, and practice for the future

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UW-Green Bay History major Megan Arent will graduate Saturday (Dec. 16, 2017) but not before a trip way back in time. She worked with Art Professor Sarah Detweiler on a project to catalog more than 500 letters written by Detweiler’s grandparents dating back to the start and continuing through World War II. Stanley Detweiler survived […]

Riley Garbe stepped on campus as a fifth-grade Phuture Phoenix — He leaves as UW-Green Bay’s ‘Most Outstanding’

“The Odds Were Stacked Against Me from the Beginning.“ Green Bay, Wis. – Riley Garbe came to UW-Green Bay as a fifth-grader on a Phuture Phoenix field trip, where a visit to the campus turned into a dream of one day graduating from college. Despite surviving a difficult childhood that included witnessing abuse and violence […]

Prof. Gurung is the December 2017 Commencement Speaker

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Regan A. R. Gurung, an award-winning professor (Human Development, Psychology) at UW-Green Bay, is the December 2017 Commencement Speaker. His research focuses on questions surrounding teaching and learning, clothing and perception and culture and health. Gurung joined the University in 1999, and has held the prestigious Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professorship since 2010. In […]

Prof. Gurung gets kudos for WPR appearance

Producers of a recent Wisconsin Public Radio segment said they received a great deal of feedback from a recent “Central Time” segment with UW-Green Bay Prof. Regan A. R. Gurung (Human Development, Psychology). The subject was “how to cope with the bad actions of those we admire.” Recent sexual misconduct allegations of many in the […]

Finals week? Gurung has study advice for students (and faculty)

With finals week approaching, UW-Green Bay Prof. Regan A. R. Gurung has some research-based advice, now published online. In “How Should You Study? Advice for Students and Faculty” Gurung explores “which learning techniques best relate to students’ past academic performance and predict current success.”

Prof. Gurung weighs in on what makes a good Thanksgiving meal

Prof. Regan A. R. Gurung (Human Development and Psychology) was quoted in a story by the Green Bay Press-Gazette on what makes an ideal Thanksgiving meal. “In many ways, what makes a good Thanksgiving meal, is fueled by this idyllic picture that we have,” said Gurung. “But it’s also informed by our idiosyncratic family traditions.”