Tag: Human Development

Faculty, staff to present at Ally Conference

The Oct. 24 diversity and equality conference at UW-Green Bay will feature presentations by a good many faculty and staff members of the University. As of this date, presenters include: Christin DePouw, Education; Joel Muraco, Human Development; Kristin Vespia, Human Development; Pao Lor, Education; Stacie Christian, Human Development; Kristy Aoki, Office of International Education; Jemma Lund, Office of International Education; Justin Mallett, American Intercultural Center; Mai Lo Lee, American Intercultural Center; Crystal Lepscier, American Intercultural Center; and Jeff Willems, Residence Life.

UWGB faculty participate in boosting liberal education

On Thursday and Friday, Sept. 24 and 25, seven UW-Green Bay faculty members traveled to Madison to attend “Connecting Your Work to LEAP Wisconsin: A Faculty Collaboratives Conference.”

Organized by the UW System and AACU — the national Association of American Colleges and Universities — the conference focused on strategies for providing he highest quality learning experiences for students, connecting essential learning outcomes to institutional disciplines, and assessing student learning.

The nationwide LEAP initiative (Liberal Education and America’s Promise) seeks to advance liberal learning and high-quality undergraduate education for all students. Wisconsin and the UW System were pilot partners when the campaign launched in 2005. Workshops at the recent Madison conference included Advocacy, Signature Work, Tuning, Providing Evidence of Student Learning, Curriculum Mapping for General Education, and Value Rubrics.

The UW-Green Bay participants (from left, photo below) were JP Leary, assistant professor, First Nations Studies; Jennifer Ham, associate professor, Humanistic Studies; Heidi Fencl, professor and chair, Physics; Alison Gates, associate professor and chair, Art; Doreen Higgins, associate professor, Social Work; Kate Burns, associateprofessor and chair, Psychology and Human Development; and Matt Dornbush, associate vice provost for academic affairs and director of graduate Studies.


Culture/Development Lab is looking for babies, toddlers for major study

UW-Green Bay’s Culture and Development Lab directed by Assistant Prof. Sawa Senzaki is looking for local parents interested in having their babies (5-18 months) participate in a major international study of baby’s social understanding. The study is part of a large international collaboration with Canadian and Japanese researchers. Senzaki is asking alumni, University employees and students with young children to consider volunteering for a visit. Participation is easy, with only a single 30- to 45-minute session in which the parent and the baby read some books and watch some short videos while Senzaki and her student research assistants observe. Participants will receive a small toy or a book as a token of appreciation. If you’re interested, please email Senzaki at senzakis@uwgb.edu or sign up at the website. “We really appreciate your help to have a better scientific understanding of infant development!”

UW-Green Bay ‘Teaching Scholars’ to present next Wednesday

Six professors from across the University who have participated in the UW-Green Bay Teaching Scholars Program will talk about their work at a gathering next Wednesday (Sept. 23). They’ll be present to discuss their SoTL projects (exploring the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and ways to enhance undergraduate education) from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in MAC Hall 201 (the Gathering Room). “Please stop by to talk with the scholars about their projects and celebrate their hard work.”

The six Teaching Scholars are:

  • Tohoro Akakpo, Social Work
  • JP Leary, First Nations Studies
  • Eric Morgan, Democracy and Justice Studies
  • Sawa Senzaki, Human Development
  • Jon Shelton, Democracy and Justice Studies
  • Aaron Weinschenk, Public and Environmental Affairs

Faculty note: Gurung publication

Regan A. R. Gurung, the Ben J. & Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Human Development and Psychology, has two chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Undergraduate Psychology Education (Dunn, 2015). One, Teaching health psychology was co-authored with UW-Green Bay Psychology major and recent graduate Elise Rittenhouse, the other is a guide to Conducting and applying the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Gurung shares secrets of learning

Psychology Prof. Regan A.R. Gurung of Human Development contributed a guest column to the Green Bay Press-Gazette this week. It offers hints on learning (as opposed to “cramming”) for students returning to school. He shares the latest thinking from cognitive science research, including three key suggestions: Start early and return to the material on multiple occasions; test yourself regularly (think of it as “practice retrieval” and not testing); and use “deep processing” to translate the material into your own words and custom create examples applicable to your own life. It also helps to have the mindset you can make yourself “smarter” by exercising your brain. Because you can.

Cupit earns Rosenberg Professorship


Prof. Illene Cupit of the Human Development academic unit has been selected to hold the Rosenberg Professorship at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for a five-year term through 2020. The honor was announced at the University’s annual convocation of faculty and staff on Aug. 26.

Chancellor Gary L. Miller presented Cupit with a ceremonial medallion. Cupit received a standing ovation from members of the University community in attendance at the event in the Phoenix Room of the University Union.

The award citation described Cupit as a prolific scholar, extraordinary instructor and nationally prominent leader in the study of death and bereavement.

“Her work with Camp Lloyd, the annual weeklong summer camp on the UWGB campus — the camp she founded to let children coping with loss know they are never alone,” the citation read, “has changed the lives of countless young people, and provided countless UW-Green Bay students rich and meaningful experience as mentors and para-professionals.”

Cupit is a specialist in cognitive development, infancy and early childhood, and death, dying and grieving. She organized the first Camp Lloyd in 2006 and named it for a family member who had to deal with the death of his father at a very young age. She envisioned the experience as a typical, fun summer camp, but one that provides a place for participating children to discover that there are other kids like them, and to learn that grieving is natural.

Cupit holds a Ph.D. from Temple University. She joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1984.

The Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professorship was established in 1985. Ben and Joyce Rosenberg were long-time residents of Green Bay and supported UW-Green Bay from its inception. Their children, Gary Rosenberg and Barbara Rosenberg Shure, provided the funding for the memorial. The Rosenberg Professorship is open to tenured faculty members from all academic fields and recognizes a professor who has demonstrated a productive commitment to scholarship and whose work exemplifies the spirit and mission of UW-Green Bay.

In assuming the formal title of Ben J. and Joyce Rosenberg Professor, Cupit succeeds Prof. Regan A.R Gurung of Human Development and becomes the seventh UW-Green Bay faculty member to hold the appointment. Others were Lynn Walter, David Damkoehler, Craig Lockard, Harvey Kaye and Timothy Meyer.

Named professorships are created through private gifts that support the study and research of a faculty member who has an outstanding record of scholarly accomplishment. The annual stipend associated with this particular professorship is for five years, but the recipient retains the title for life. Stipends are typically applied to research expenses or special projects benefitting students or service to the community.

The Rosenberg Professorship is one of seven named professorships at UW-Green Bay.

UW-Green Bay honors top faculty, staff with 2015 Founders Awards

founders-award-winners-postThe University of Wisconsin-Green Bay has recognized its top faculty and staff members with 2015 Founders Awards for Excellence. The award winners, honored at the annual UW-Green Bay Faculty and Staff Convocation Wednesday morning, Aug. 26, are:

Teaching — Associate Prof. Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges
Scholarship — Prof. Matt Dornbush
Community Outreach — Prof. John Luczaj
Institutional Development — Associate Prof. Denise Bartell
Academic Support — Mike Kline
Classified Staff — Amanda Wildenberg
Collaborative Achievement — The Digital and Public Humanities Project

Posing in the photo, above, standing from left are Wilson-Doenges, Luczaj, Dornbush and Bartell. Seated are Wildenberg and faculty members representing the Digital Humanities Project, Associate Profs. Chuck Rybak and Caroline Boswell. Not pictured: Mike Kline.

The awards were presented before an audience of more than 400 in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. Made possible by private philanthropic support, the awards program has been an annual fixture at UW-Green Bay since 1975. Honorees are selected by a campuswide committee from among nominations submitted by faculty, staff and others.

Wilson-Doenges, the recipient of the Founder’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, is an associate professor of Human Development and a specialist in environmental psychology and best practices in neighborhood planning and urban design. The award citation credited her with effectively connecting with students, regardless of major, in courses both online and in-person, and bringing energy not only to her classroom but to her work with students on internships, independent studies, and honors projects. One nominator said her enthusiasm for her subject has the ability to make even the statistical concept of standard deviation “riveting.” Wilson-Doenges joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 1995 after earning her Ph.D. from the University of California-Irvine.

Dornbush, recipient of the award for scholarship, was recognized for his work as a professor of biology with the Natural and Applied Sciences academic unit. He has made a priority of involving both graduate and undergraduate students in his research projects where possible, and has been successful in winning outside grants to support that research. His primary interests involve the role of native plant restorations in improving ecosystems, including the potential use of native tallgrass for bio-energy purposes, and the restoration of wild rice, bulrush and wild celery stands in the lower bay. Dornbush joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2005 after earning his doctoral degree in ecology at Iowa State University. He recently joined the academic affairs administrative team at UW-Green Bay as the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Professional Development and Grants, and Director of Graduate Studies.

The award citation for Geoscience professor Luczaj, a member of the Natural and Applied Sciences faculty, called the Founders Award for Excellence in Community Outreach a perfect fit for a faculty member who is “an asset to UWGB as a researcher, instructor and community ambassador in the field of geology.” An authority on the geology and bedrock of Northeastern Wisconsin and related groundwater issues, Luczaj has provided guidance to technical groups on vital groundwater issues and advised varied stakeholders on aquifer protection strategies. In addition to working with UWGB students, he has connected with the community through geoscience presentations to family and K-12 groups as well as to UWGB Learning in Retirement audiences. He holds a Ph.D. in geology from Johns Hopkins and joined the Green Bay faculty in 2005.

Bartell, honored in the category of Institutional Development, was recognized for her efforts in ensuring the success of new and continuing students and the larger University. Bartell is an associate professor of psychology in the Human Development academic unit. In recent years she has assumed leadership in campuswide efforts to improve student retention and graduation rates, particularly for first-generation students and those who are from under-represented groups or who face special challenges. She is founder and program director for the Phoenix GPS Program, which has identified “high-impact” practices to help students thrive. (The practices include encouraging greater campus involvement, mentoring, effective study skills and active/engaged learning experiences for newcomers.) Bartell joined UW-Green Bay in 2002 after earning her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas.

Kline received the Founders Award for Excellence in Academic Support in recognition of his success in fostering, according to the award citation, “a department culture where academic success, not just completion, is an uncompromising priority.” Kline works in Phoenix Athletics administration as assistant AD of Compliance and Student Welfare. A 1988 graduate of UW-Green Bay, he landed the position of Phoenix cross-country coach while still a student-athlete in 1987. In 1999 he accepted additional duties as academics coordinator for all Phoenix teams. In the years since, the program has posted at least 31 consecutive semesters of cumulative GPAs of 3.0 or better, had a series of all-league and even all-America academic honorees, and had individual teams rank among the best in America in terms of academic performance. Nominators described Kline as “dedicated” “tireless” and “passionate” about encouraging academic and career success.

Wildenberg, recipient of the Founder’s Award for University Staff , is a university services associate in the Dean of Students Office. Nominators praised her customer-service orientation, good humor and cool under pressure in interacting with a clientele as varied and diverse as the University itself — students, parents, faculty, staff, senior administrators and others. She takes a lead role in coordinating a major, Universitywide program that serves almost a thousand new students and their families annually. The award citation also mentioned her technological skills, involvement in staff governance and efforts to “make UW-Green Bay a better place to work.” Wildenberg, who earned her bachelor’s at UW-Milwaukee, joined the UW-Green Bay staff in 2008.

The Digital and Public Humanities Project, led by Associate Profs. Chuck Rybak and Caroline Boswell of the Humanistic Studies faculty, earned the Founders Award in the category of Collaborative Achievement. The project, which began with creation of a “digital commons” at UW-Green Bay, relies on modern technology to greatly expand opportunity for sharing the humanities — ancient and modern languages, literature, philosophy, religion, history and the visual and performing arts — rather than distract from, or diminish interest, as some might expect in what is often characterized as an age of shortened attention spans. One nominator wrote of Rybak and Boswell, “by bringing students into this field (they have) opened new doors that will lead not only to new employment opportunities, but new ways to engage in lifelong interdisciplinary learning.” The project is credited with helping students avail themselves of new digital technologies, advance their skill sets and also make the field more accessible to the public at large. Boswell, a historian, joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2008 after earning her Ph.D. at Brown University. Rybak, a professor of English and creative writing, is a widely published poet who received his Ph.D. at the University of Cincinnati.


Faculty note: Christine Smith

Associate Prof. of Psychology Christine Smith of the Human Development and Women’s and Gender Studies programs is co-author of a book chapter titled “Medicalizing women’s weight: Bariatric surgery and weight-loss drugs” with Julie Konik, Ph.D., of University of Wisconsin College-Sheboygan. The chapter is published in the book The Wrong Prescription for Women: How Medicine and Media Create a ‘Need’ for Treatment, Drugs, and Surgery.