Tag: common theme

New year, new Common Theme: Engaging in Public Life

With a new school year just a week away, your University Common Theme committee is spreading the word about this year’s topic, Engaging in Public Life. Proposed by Assistant Prof. Aaron Weinschenk, Public and Environmental Affairs, this year’s theme aims to get people thinking about the myriad ways in which they can engage in public life, politics and civic activities.

Common Theme events start this week, so keep an eye on the calendar (and submit your own events) at www.uwgb.edu/commontheme/events. Throughout the year, the Common Theme committee also would like to highlight the many different ways in which students, faculty and staff engage in community service and public life. If you would like to share a story, photo or video of an event, please contact one of the Common Theme co-chairs, Brenda Amenson-Hill or Donna Ritch. For information on the Common Theme program, past themes and more, visit www.uwgb.edu/commontheme.

‘Living on One Dollar’ screening, discussion to be held Feb. 18

Could you live on a dollar a day? Three college students set out to do just that in a remote Guatemalan village, documenting their 56-day journey for the documentary film “Living on One Dollar.” On Tuesday (Feb. 18), the UW-Green Bay and larger communities are invited to a screening of the film, which will be followed by a program featuring area experts. The event starts at 7 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. There is no cost to attend, parking is free in the Union Visitor Lot and snacks will be provided. Questions? Contact Ashley Heath at 465-2608 or heatha@uwgb.edu. The event is a collaborative effort between the Center for Public Affairs, Public and Environmental Affairs, the Student Government Association and campus Common Theme.

‘Engaging in Public Life’ chosen as next Common Theme

The UW-Green Bay campus Common Theme for 2014-15 will be “Engaging in Public Life,” a program that focuses on civic engagement, volunteerism, public service and more. Submitted by Assistant Prof. Aaron Weinschenk, Public and Environmental Affairs, the theme will explore such questions as “How is UW-Green Bay doing in preparing students to be good citizens and in providing students with opportunities and examples of how to participate in civic life? What are we doing well? How can we improve? What is our overall approach to civic engagement and what should it be as we move forward?” Weinschenk’s proposal was presented with support from PEA, Political Science, Global Studies, Democracy and Justice Studies and the Center for Public Affairs. It was chosen by the Common Theme Committee, co-chaired by Associate Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean Donna Ritch and Dean of Students Brenda Amenson-Hill. For more information on the Common Theme, including a full lineup of spring semester events for the current theme, “Global Citizenship in an Evolving World,” visit https://www.uwgb.edu/commontheme/.

Final reminder: Common Theme proposals due Monday

Here’s one final reminder that proposals for the 2014-15 campus Common Theme are due Monday (Dec. 2) — and with the holiday this week, time is especially short. Proposals should include the title of the theme; a short description and why it would be an appropriate theme for UW-Green Bay; and a few ideas regarding activities, speakers and books you would suggest as part of the theme. Proposals should be submitted to Scott Furlong, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at furlongs@uwgb.edu or Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at ritchd@uwgb.edu. Decisions on proposals will be made and communicated no later than Jan. 15. More info about the Common Theme is available at www.uwgb.edu/commontheme.

Modern-day abolitionist Russell to speak about efforts to end sex trafficking

The founder of an organization that provides services and support to boys who are victims of child prostitution and commercial sexual exploitation in Thailand will address a campus audience Wednesday (Nov. 20) in a Common Theme event sponsored by Student Life and the student organization Unchained. Alezandra Russell founded Urban Light after witnessing the horrors of sex-trafficking and child prostitution during a trip to Thailand in 2009. Just months later, she quit her desk job and grabbed her passport for a bi-continental existence as a modern-day abolitionist. Russell pawned her engagement and wedding rings to fund the inception of the Recycled Child Project, which became Urban Light. Realizing the great potential of students to modern day change-makers, Russell has initiated a Campus Awareness Campaign, which provides an entry point for students’ involvement in combatting sex trafficking. She will speak at 8 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of the Union.
 

Common Theme proposals due Dec. 2

Just a friendly reminder that proposals for the 2014-15 campus Common Theme are now being accepted, and are due by Dec. 2. As we told you here before, this year’s theme is “Global Citizenship in an Evolving World,” and there already have been a number of events associated with the theme — with more to follow in the coming months (www.uwgb.edu/commontheme/). The purpose of the Common Theme is to allow faculty, academic staff and students the ability to focus on a general theme from multiple perspectives and have a campuswide shared experience. Proposals for the 2014-2015 Common Theme should include the title of the theme; a short description and why it would be an appropriate theme for UW-Green Bay; and a few ideas regarding activities, speakers and books you would suggest as part of the theme. Proposals should be submitted to Scott Furlong, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at furlongs@uwgb.edu or Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at ritchd@uwgb.edu. Decisions on proposals will be made and communicated no later than Jan. 15.

Slideshow: Workshop on ‘cardboard books’ draws crowd for Argentine artists

Workshop - How to Make Cartonero BooksThere was an impressive turnout of campus artists, Spanish speakers and others for the workshop “How to Make Cartonero Books,” which took place Nov. 11 in the 1965 Room of the University Union. The session was led by María Gómez and Washington Cucurto. The principals of the Buenos Aires-based publishing house Eloísa Cartonera — which pioneered a new economic model with the unique art form known as cartonera books — were visiting UW-Green Bay last week as part of the yearlong Common Theme focus on global citizenship.

The workshop began with a slideshow followed by a demonstration and then do-it-yourself creativity by participants. Students bound pages of “Evita Lives” by Nestor Perlongher, “El Joyero” by Ricardo Piglia, and other titles were “Some Dollars,” and “That Woman.”

The Eloísa Cartonera cooperative originated in the early 2000s with the Argentine economy in crisis and people taking to the streets to scratch out a living. Among them were the so-called cartoneros, who scrounged containers and cardboard to recycle and re-sell. A group of artists, designers and writers — also hard hit by the economy but willing to lend support — developed a plan for a cooperative that would pay reasonable wages to the cartoneros and transform the waste cardboard into handmade art books to be sold at inexpensive prices. Background on the workshop, cooperative and more can be found here.

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– Photos by Kimberly Vlies, Office of Marketing and University Communication

Creating a Common Theme: Proposals now being accepted for next year

The campuswide Common Theme for the 2013-2014 academic year is “Global Citizenship in an Evolving World,” and there already have been a number of events associated with the theme — with more to follow in the coming months (www.uwgb.edu/commontheme/).

The purpose of the Common Theme is to allow faculty, academic staff and students the ability to focus on a general theme from multiple perspectives and have a campuswide shared experience. Proposals for the 2014-2015 Common Theme are now being accepted. The proposal should include the title of the theme; a short description and why it would be an appropriate theme for UW-Green Bay; and a few ideas regarding activities, speakers and books you would suggest as part of the theme. Proposals are due by Dec. 2, and should be submitted to Scott Furlong, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at furlongs@uwgb.edu or Donna Ritch, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, at ritchd@uwgb.edu. Decisions on proposals will be made and communicated no later than Jan. 15.

UW-Green Bay hosts innovative Argentine ‘cartonera’ publishers

Two principals of the Buenos Aires-based publishing house Eloísa Cartonera — which pioneered a new economic model with the unique art form known as cartonera books — are visiting UW-Green Bay this week for workshops, presentations and readings.

Founders María Gómez and Washington Cucurto will begin their five-day stay with a presentation at 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8, on the topic “Eloísa Cartonera: Ten Years of Artisanal Publishing in Latin America.” The event is free and open to the public and will take place at the Richard Mauthe Center, located near the central campus at 2418 Leon Bond Drive.

The Eloísa Cartonera cooperative originated in the early 2000s with the Argentine economy in crisis and people taking to the streets to scratch out a living. Among them were the so-called cartoneros, who scrounged containers and cardboard to recycle and re-sell. A group of artists, designers and writers — also hard hit by the economy but willing to lend support — developed a plan for a cooperative that would pay reasonable wages to the cartoneros and transform the waste cardboard into handmade art books to be sold at inexpensive prices.

Within a few years, Eloísa Cartonera had refined its concept of making literature more accessible, and both upcoming and established Latin American writers agreed to donate novels, stage plays and poems. The texts are manually bound inside creatively designed, individually painted cardboard covers.

In 2012, the cooperative was honored with a Prince Claus Award presented by a charitable foundation of the Dutch Royal Family to recognize outstanding achievement in cultural development. “Eloísa Cartonera came up with a collective response to a context of crisis, by combining art and creativity to promote expression and generate social and economic welfare,” the citation read. The cartonera model has now spread to dozens of cardboard publishers in Latin America and Africa.

Gómez and Cucurto will be featured in the following public programs:

•  5-7 p.m. Friday (Nov. 8) — Presentation and poetry reading on the topic “Eloísa Cartonera: Ten Years of Artisanal Publishing in Latin America,” at the Mauthe Center

•  7:30 p.m. Saturday (Nov. 9) — “Resistance and Memory in Latin American Art,” at the public WC Gallery located in the residence of UW-Green Bay Curator of Art Stephen Perkins, 908 Talbot Ave., De Pere

•  5-7 p.m. Monday (Nov. 11) — A workshop, “How to Make Cartonero Books,” in the 1965 Room of the University Union

The visitors will also speak to the UW-Green Bay classes Latin America Today, and World Literature, on Tuesday.

The visit by Gómez and Cucurto ties in with a series of ongoing events and activities addressing the University’s 2013-14 Common Theme, “Global Citizenship in an Evolving Word.” Support was provided by the Office of International Education and the Humanistic Studies academic unit. Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz, assistant professor of Humanistic Studies, organized the visit.

For a video that describes Eloísa Cartonera, its history and work, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2lVI-ai68A

Common Theme: Former Times writer will talk immigration, diversity

Brooke Hauser, author of The New Kids: Big Dreams and Grave Journeys at a High School for Immigrant Teens, will speak at 8 p.m. Thursday (Nov. 7) in the Phoenix Room of the University Union. An award-winning author, journalist, teacher, and lecturer who has written for The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Allure, Hauser chronicled a year at Brooklyn’s International High School at Prospect Heights, a vibrant public school that serves recently arrived immigrants and refugees from around the world. New Kids was a 2012 winner of the American Library Association’s Alex Award, given to the ten best books written for adults that appeal to teens. The New York Times wrote, “Ms. Hauser’s book is a refreshing reminder of the hurdles newcomers to this country still face and how many defy the odds to overcome them.” Her Thursday night lecture is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by Student Life as part of the University’s 2013-2014 Common Theme: Global Citizenship in an Evolving World.