Reminder: Philosophers’ Café event this Wednesday

The rise and speed with which globalization has spread across the world have increasingly brought different ethnic and cultural groups into greater contact than ever before. Wars, famine, and climate change have also increased the numbers of refugees, migrants, and asylum seekers which, in turn, has led to increased cultural conflict as well as renewed nationalism and ethnocentrism. But is conflict unavoidable? Are multicultural societies still possible or are integration and assimilation the goal again for most societies? Is the globalization of the future only an economic and neo-liberal construct or can it be positively applied to culture? Please join on Wednesday, March 10 to discuss these important issues. The discussion will be moderated by UW-Green Bay Prof. David Coury (German and Humanities).

Join the Zoom event Wednesday, March 10, from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Philosophers’ Cafe: Arguing by Analogy, Feb. 10, 7 p.m.

The next Philosophers’ Cafe: Arguing by Analogy is Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2021 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in a virtual environment via TEAMS. “Please join us for some fun discussion regarding arguments from analogy! Our discussion will be moderated by Dr. Michael Wreen (Philosophy, Marquette University). A very common form of argument uses an analogy to show that something is the case or that something isn’t the case. Sometimes these arguments don’t generate any controversy. Some of the arguments for the conclusion that certain drugs are safe and effective for treating human diseases, for example, are arguments from analogy, and they’re fine. But arguments from analogy on matters of ethics or religion many times do generate controversy. People tend to jump into such arguments to make points without thinking much about what an argument from analogy is or what the general criteria are for determining how strong or weak an argument from analogy is. After briefly discussing those two matters, we’ll have an open general discussion of a famous argument from analogy for the existence of God. This is the Design Argument for the Existence of God. We hope to see you there!” Join via the TEAMS link.

Philosopher’s Café event to delve into Anti-Realism in Science on Wednesday, Nov. 11

Come join us Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. for some fun conversation on the nature and aims of science with CAHSS and Effect! Ever since Isaac Newton’s counter-intuitive yet powerfully predictive theory of universal gravitation, scientists have had to grapple with the possibility that their theories may not explain the world, but only help us to make predictions about its future. Anti-Realism, one of the dominant views in the Philosophy of Science, maintains that scientific theories are nothing more than fictional constructs whose only aim is to make correct predictions. Asked whether electrons are real, the Anti-Realist will reply that the very question is nonsensical; because there is no way to visually verify the existence of an electron the question of its reality cannot be answered. In this month’s Philosopher’s Café, Chris Martin (University of Toledo) hosts as we will delve into the murky waters of Anti-Realism in science. Join the discussion… Philosopher’s Café: Do Electrons Exist: Anti-Realism in Science. For more information and to join the live event, visit the CAHSS and Effect website.

Philosophers’ Café: Do Electrons Exist: Anti-Realism in Science, Nov. 11

Join the conversation, Nov. 11, 2020 at 7 p.m. on the nature and aims of science. “Ever since Isaac Newton’s counter-intuitive yet powerfully predictive theory of universal gravitation, scientists have had to grapple with the possibility that their theories may not explain the world, but only help us to make predictions about its future. Anti-Realism, one of the dominant views in the Philosophy of Science, maintains that scientific theories are nothing more than fictional constructs whose only aim is to make correct predictions. Asked whether electrons are real, the Anti-Realist will reply that the very question is nonsensical; because there is no way to visually verify the existence of an electron the question of its reality cannot be answered.” In this month’s Philosophers’ Café, Chris Martin (University of Toledo) hosts as philosophers and others delve into the murky waters of Anti-Realism in science. Join the event.

Reminder: You are invited to Philosopher’s Cafe, Feb. 12, 7 to 9 p.m.

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to the Philosopher’s Café Series. The series begins on Feb. 12, 2020 from 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn (Downtown Green Bay) with a discussion on Racial Ethics. A student of philosophy, critical race theory and black theology, Domonique Turnipseed, recently moved from the deep south to the most segregated city in America to pursue his Ph.D. at Marquette University. Join us as he leads a conversation about the philosophy of race and ethnicity. Philosopher’s Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. It’s free and open to the public.

You are invited to Philosopher’s Cafe, Feb. 12, 7 to 9 p.m.

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to the Philosopher’s Café Series. The series begins on Feb. 12, 2020 from 7 to 9 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn (Downtown Green Bay) with a discussion on Racial Ethics. A student of philosophy, critical race theory and black theology, Domonique Turnipseed, recently moved from the deep south to the most segregated city in America to pursue his Ph.D. at Marquette University. Join us as he leads a conversation about the philosophy of race and ethnicity. Philosopher’s Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. It’s free and open to the public.

Next Philosopher’s Cafe on Wednesday, May 8

The next Philosopher’s Cafe (as well as Death Cafe) will be taking place on Wednesday, May 8, 2019 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn in Green Bay. The seventeenth-century philosopher La Rouchefoucauld claimed that one can no more look steadily at death than he can the sun. And yet, people do die, and people grieve. Join organizers for a discussion with UW-Green Bay Prof. Illene Cupit (Human Development, Psychology) and a scholar in the emerging filed of “Thanatology,” the study of death and dying. Is grief a universal phenomenon? Is it necessary to grieve, and if so, is it preferable to get psycho pharmaceutical or psychotherapeutic help? These are some of the issues to be discussed in this Philosophers’ Cafe (or “Death Cafe”).

Next Philosophers’ Café is Wednesday, April 10

The next Philosophers’ Café, “Road Trip! Finding Democracy and the American Dream on the Road,” will be taking place on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 at 7 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn in Green Bay. Associate Prof. Eric Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies) will be acting as the moderator. The event is always free and open to the public.

About this Philosophers’ Café: “Throughout the nation’s history Americans have always loved to be on the move, embracing a pioneering spirit that is embedded deep within the country’s democratic ideals of opportunity and expansion, of dreams and reinvention. With the widespread availability of cars and the establishment of a vast highway system by the mid-20th century, many Americans had more opportunities than ever before to explore their nation and to reinvent themselves, taking untraveled roads to seek out their own American dreams. Why has the road mattered so much to Americans as they have sought to find and define themselves amidst eras of expansion, depression, war, turbulence and peace? Bring along your favorite road trip novel, film, song or, best of all, personal road trip memory.”

Reminder: Philosopher’s Cafe is this Wednesday (March 13)

The next Philosopher’s Cafe will be taking place on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn in Green Bay. The discussion will be featuring the topic “Language as a means for identity construction.” The moderator will be UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Lorena Sainz-Maza Lecanda (Humanities, Spanish). Participants in this Philosopher’s Cafe will be invited to reflect on their own use of language and its impact on their sense of identity and belonging to a community. Learn more.

Next Philosopher’s Cafe to take place on Wednesday, Mar. 13

The next Philosopher’s Cafe will be taking place on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at St. Brendan’s Inn in Green Bay. The discussion will be featuring the topic “Language as a means for identity construction.” The moderator will be UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Lorena Sainz-Maza Lecanda (Humanities, Spanish). Participants in this Philosopher’s Cafe will be invited to reflect on their own use of language and its impact on their sense of identity and belonging to a community. Learn more.