Campus mourns the loss of Professor Emeritus Tian You Hu

UW-Green Bay mourns the loss of UW-Green Bay Professor Emeritus Tian You Hu. He passed away on Friday, May 22, 2020 after a battle with COVID-19. He was a Mathematics professor and served as former chair of the program. He retired from Natural and Applied Sciences in 2016 after 25 years of dedication and service to UW-Green Bay.

His daughter, Lori Hu, sent an update regarding his passing, memorial service and scholarship fund in his name:

“Dr. Tian You Hu, a loving father and husband, passed peacefully from this world on May 22, 2020 after a brave, month-long battle with COVID-19.  He was 71.

Prof. Emeritus Tian You Hu

Tian was born on Jan 23, 1949 in Enping, China. Following the Cultural Revolution in China, he studied at Zhongshan University and then completed his Ph.D. at the University of Pittsburgh. Tian was a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay for over 25 years, from 1990 to his retirement in 2016. He was a lifelong scholar, read widely and was actively writing research papers up until his illness.

Tian was a simple man, and embodied gratitude and wisdom. He did not care for things like money or power, but treated everyone with respect regardless of their status in life and gave without expecting anything in return. He let things go, forgave easily and looked outward at life. He found great joy and honor in fatherhood, and made every sacrifice to give his children a better life. Like all immigrants, he survived grueling physical and mental challenges to come to the U.S. and provide for his family, and achieved a life beyond his wildest dreams.

He is reunited with his father, Hu Jie Yu; mother, Zheng Feng Chun; and elder brother, Hu Tian Xi. He is survived and missed by his wife of 37 years, Bao Qin He; eldest daughter, Lori Hu; and youngest son, Alex Hu.

In his memory, the Dr. Tian You Hu Memorial Endowed Scholarship has been established to support aspiring students at UW-Green Bay.”

Online donations can be made to the GoFundMe account, https://www.gofundme.com/f/dr-tian-you-hu-memorial-scholarship. Tax-deductible donations can be made with a check payable to:

UW-Green Bay Foundation
2420 Nicolet Drive
Cofrin Library Suite 805
Green Bay, WI 54311-7001

Please note the Dr. Tian You Hu Memorial Endowed Scholarship

Send online condolences through Facebook.

A memorial service will be held over Zoom on Thursday May 28, 2020 for family, friends and colleagues to share their memories. Immediate family will be present at Proko-Wall Funeral Home, 1630 E. Mason St, Green Bay, WI 54302.

Meeting ID: 858 1910 8325

Password: 7UR38K

  • Chinese portion: 10 a.m. Central Time / 11 p.m. China Time
  • English portion: 1 p.m. Central Time

 

Watch the International Women’s Day panel at Manitowoc Campus on Facebook

On Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in honor of International Women’s Day this past Sunday, Associate Prof. Rebecca Abler (Water Science), Associate Prof. Amy Kabrhel (Natural and Applied Sciences), Assistant Prof. Breeyawn Lybbert (Natural and Applied Sciences) and Associate Prof. Megumi Onoda (Mathematics and Statistics) held a panel discussion on Women in STEM. If you couldn’t make it in person, you can watch online now.

Campus mourns loss of lecturer Don Drewiske

Members of the Green Bay Campus learned of the passing of  Associate Lecturer Donald Drewiske, who passed away unexpectedly on Oct. 16, 2019. The lifelong educator taught both biology and math at UW-Green Bay. The De Pere native began his teaching career at Abbott Pennings High School, then working for the Oneida Tribe, and lastly UW-Green Bay, primarily teaching courses in Biology and Math. According to his obituary, “he loved to read, play with his dogs, try new recipes, go running, build furniture, garden, and complete crossword puzzles. He had recently begun to pursue his interest in painting and completed a large collection of
beautiful landscapes. Don enjoyed outdoor activities in every season, and was a great nature lover. He looked forward to family gatherings and was a proud husband and father.”  Read the full obituary. Friends may call from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, 2019 at Ryan Funeral Home, 305 N. Tenth Street, De Pere. A memorial service will be held at 3:30 p.m. with Deacon Mike Vander Bloomen presiding. Memorial donations made in his honor may be sent to Happily Ever After (heanokill.org) or the Human Biology Program Fund, UW-Green Bay Foundation, UW-Green Bay, Cofrin Library Suite 805, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay, WI 54311-7001.

Faculty note: Collaboration between faculty (Zhu, Reilly, Olson Hunt, Horvarter) leads to publication

An eight-year span of data collection, two years of data analysis, and hard work over summer 2019 resulted in a collaborative publication by Associate Prof. Janet Reilly (Nursing), Associate Prof. Le Zhu (Human Biology), Associate Prof. Megan Olson Hunt (Mathematics & Statistics), Senior Lecturer Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) and a retired public health nurse, M. Brigid Flood. “Comparison of Rural Childhood BMI Percentiles: Prevalence and Trends in a Midwest County, 2008–2016” was published by SAGE Publishing and The Journal of School Nursing. The article ABSTRACT: The number of children who are obese and overweight continues as a public health challenge despite decades of research. The purpose of this article is to describe trends in body mass index (BMI) percentile data collected from 11- to 14-year-old school children in 2008–2009 and 2015–2016 in rural Wisconsin. The BMI percentiles from 1,347 students were compared using time, gender, age, and school (public vs. parochial) as predictors. The trend over time indicated a decrease in students of healthy weight and an increase in those overweight or obese. Also noted was a significantly higher proportion of children who were overweight or obese in parochial compared to public schools. Discussed are the observed trends, community-wide initiatives implemented, as well as how schools can employ a more comprehensive approach to childhood obesity that first ensures community readiness and involves school, home, and community.

STEAM Engine VIII at Neville Public Museum , Wednesday, Mar. 13

The STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) Engine VIII event at the Neville Museum will be taking on Wednesday, Mar. 13, 2019 at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The STEAM Engine is an interactive event that features speakers with exciting projects, new business ventures and cutting edge research. The STEAM Engine showcases individuals and organizations in the region who are seeking new horizons in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The events kick off at 6 p.m. with a short live music performance followed by presentations and Q & A. The social networking hour with soda, Titletown beer and popcorn rounds out the night. UW-Green Bay is a sponsor. Learn more.

Reminder: Free STEAM Engine VII at the Neville Museum this Wednesday, Nov. 14

The STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) Engine VII event at the Neville Museum will be taking on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The STEAM Engine is an interactive event held at the Neville Museum that features speakers with exciting projects, new business ventures and cutting edge research. The STEAM Engine showcases individuals and organizations in the region who are seeking new horizons in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The events kick off at 6 p.m. with a short live music performance followed by presentations, including one from UW-Green Bay lecturer Benjamin Geisler (Computer Science), and Q & A. The social networking hour with soda, Titletown beer and popcorn rounds out the night. Learn more.

Free STEAM Engine event to take place at Neville Museum on Wednesday, Nov. 14

The STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) Engine VII event at the Neville Museum will be taking on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 at 6 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. The STEAM Engine is an interactive event held at the Neville Museum that features speakers with exciting projects, new business ventures and cutting edge research. The STEAM Engine showcases individuals and organizations in the region who are seeking new horizons in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. The events kick off at 6 p.m. with a short live music performance followed by presentations, including one from lecturer Benjamin Geisler (Computer Science), and Q & A. The social networking hour with soda, Titletown beer and popcorn rounds out the night. Learn more.

Alumni spotlight: Richard Kendrick enjoys first week (and every day) of school

It’s the first week of school and UW-Green Bay alumnus Richard Kendrick ’08 is excited… When the students return from summer break to Madison Area Technical College, Kendricks’ day kicks into high gear. And he wouldn’t have it any other way.

Kendrick is a mathematics instructor, math adviser and a member of the honors faculty for MATC. It’s safe to say that his students need him.

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Madison Area Technical College instructor Richard Kendrick

“Most of the students I deal with come from underrepresented areas within the city,” he says. “The best part of my day is speaking with a student about how to be a successful college student. After all, I was a returning adult student myself. I came from the south side of Madison, which has been given a bad reputation by most. I am enjoying the fact that Madison College is now building a south side campus which will ultimately cater to the residents of the neighborhood.”

Kendrick says he models his mentoring based on some of the faculty and staff at UW-Green Bay, especially as he spends a good majority of his time at MATC’s Student Achievement Center, tutoring math students.

“As far as the faculty that helped me achieve my dream of being a first generation college grad, I give many props to (Professors) Greg Davis and Patricia Terry. For me, it wasn’t always about academics. I felt I could go to them for support in learning how to be a college student, while gaining insight into who I would become after I graduated. I ended up graduating in 2008 as a Mathematics major (Environmental Science minor) with roughly 174 credits; well-rounded to say the least. I enjoyed learning about so many subject areas: computer science, nuclear engineering, materials engineering, and mathematics, to name a few.”

When he wasn’t in the classroom, his peers could likely find him at the Phoenix Sports Center (the predecessor to the Kress Events Center) where he even received an invitation from men’s basketball coach Dick Bennett to try out for the team as a walk-on. He also spent some time in the Phoenix Club, managing to garner a few recreational billiards championships.

In spring of last year, Kendrick returned to campus for a visit.

“My impression of the campus now is, WOW, how things have changed! I have definitely gotten older,” he joked.

He describes his job as his calling. “I enjoy waking up every day to come into work,” he says.  Seeing the advancement of his students as they work towards graduation is his greatest reward.

“It is so amazing to learn that some students who started their math classes with me have completed their degrees. I have written numerous reference letters to date for my students. The last day of classes, I always give out my business card just in case they made need anything else to advance their careers.

And he is likely to share his favorite quote… “It is not what you know when you get here, it is what you know when you leave.”

Photos by MATC graphic designer Matthew Ammerman

 

 

Post-Crescent Academic All-Star nominees plan for UW-Green Bay

The Appleton Post-Crescent published the names of its 2018 All-Star Academic nominees. The students were nominated by their high schools for academic achievement, extracurricular activities, community service, leadership, and character. Two of the nominees have plans to join UW-Green Bay after graduation. Paul St. Aubin, Hortonville High School, wants to study Mathematics and Education at UW-Green Bay, and Samantha Struzynski, Little Wolf High School, wants to study Human Biology at UW-Green Bay.

Hunt finishes as a semi-finalist at International Business Model Competition

UW-Green Bay student entrepreneur Sam Hunt attended the International Business Model Competition (IBMC) last week. His idea, Local Food Experiment, recently won the WiSys Wisconsin Big Idea Tournament, which earned him $2,500 and a trip to the IBMC. Hunt and his team were one of the 20 to move to the IBMC semi-finals, and although they did not make the final five, they walked out with a new experience and $3,000.