Prof. Heidi Sherman awarded a Title VIII Fellowship

Heidi Sherman (History and Humanities) has been awarded a Title VIII Fellowship by Indiana University Bloomington to pursue intensive language study at the Summer Language Workshop in Summer 2021.  The fellowship will support participation in virtual classes in advanced Russian language, which will assist in furthering Prof. Sherman’s work on a monograph of the Viking town, Staraia Ladoga.

Faculty note: Associate Professor Shelton to be a Director for Labor and Working Class History Society in March

In a competitive election, Associate Professor Jon Shelton (History) recently won a three-year term on the Board of Directors for the Labor and Working-Class History Society, the preeminent professional organization for labor history in the U.S. His term starts this March. Congrats!

This site has a full list of directors.

Faculty note: Associate Provost Ganyard to step away from administrative role, return to teaching

Clif Ganyard will be stepping down as Associate Provost and returning to his faculty position this summer. Ganyard is the University’s second-longest-serving associate provost and has boldly led a number of key initiatives including Project Coastal (the addition of campuses in Marinette, Manitowoc and Sheboygan to UW-Green Bay) and Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accreditation. He has helped UW-Green Bay shepherd new programs and articulation agreements forward and ensures high-quality standards with his work on assessment and program review. His wealth of institutional knowledge will not easily be replaced. In recognition of his many contributions, Ganyard was recognized with the Founders Award for Excellence in Institutional Development in 2019. UW-Green Bay students will benefit from his return to teaching. In 2010, Ganyard earned the UW-Green Bay Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching (History, Humanities), followed in 2014 by the prestigious UW System Board of Regents Teaching Excellence Award.

CAHSS Launches ‘No Reservations’ Speaker Series beginning Feb. 10

UW-Green Bay’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences is filled with brilliant teachers, scholars, and creatives. The goal of the college is to provide an accessible forum for sharing bold, challenging, and even radical ideas. Scholars from across the college will do one talk each month on topics ranging from connecting through music to the politics of consumer culture. Each talk will be streamed live from Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts and will include a short presentation followed by a Q and A with Dean Chuck Rybak. Online viewers will be able to submit questions as well. It is free and open to the public.

Spring 2021 Schedule:

Feb 10, 6:30 p.m.
Title: Understanding Your Anger
Speaker: Prof. Ryan Martin

Description: Like any emotion, our anger exists for good reason.  When we are willing to take an honest look and dig deep into our frustration, we can learn a lot about ourselves and the situations we find ourselves in.

Speaker Bio: Ryan Martin is a psychologist, anger researcher, and author of the book, Why We Get Mad: How to Use Your Anger for Positive Change. He is the Associate Dean for the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

 

March 23, 6:30 p.m.
Title: The Rise and Fall of the Human Capital Myth
Speaker: Associate Prof. Jon Shelton

Description: This talk will help explain our current political divisions by examining how Americans’ conception of opportunity has changed over time.  Shelton argues that American policymakers in the recent past have asked public education to do too much, and we have to ensure that every American, no matter their level of education, has a guarantee of economic security.

Speaker Bio: Jon Shelton is associate professor and chair of Democracy and Justice Studies.  He is the author of the prize-winning book Teacher Strike! Public Education and the Making of a New American Political Order and a recent postdoctoral fellow of the National Academy of Education.

 

April 15, 6:30 p.m.
Title: The Next Best Thing: Connecting Through Music in Spite of Everything
Speaker: Prof. Michelle McQuade Dewhirst

Description: The pandemic has forced musicians to rethink the ways in which they relate to their audiences and to each other. In this talk, I’ll discuss pieces I’ve written in the past year for musicians who are finding new ways to connect in a time of crisis.

Speaker Bio: Michelle McQuade Dewhirst is a composer, horn player, and Professor of Music at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

 

May 4, 6:30 p.m
Title: Politics and Mass Consumer Culture: Lessons from the 1920s
Speaker: Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly

Description: Historians have long debated the effect of mass consumer culture on Americans’ political engagement in the 1920s. How should we understand the decline of political participation in the jazz age? And what lessons does the 1920s hold for our own time?

Speaker Bio: Kimberley Reilly is an associate professor of Democracy & Justice Studies and History, and co-chair of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program.

 

UW-Green Bay alumni recognized for extraordinary efforts as 2021 Golden Apple Teachers of Distinction

UW-Green Bay graduates impact generations! Congratulations to the UW-Green Bay alumni selected as Teachers of Distinction in the first round of the Golden Apple Awards selection process. These outstanding teachers make a big impact on the students, parents and community. The teachers of Distinction and soon-to-be announced Golden Apple recipients will be honored at the 2021 Golden Apple Awards ceremony, televised on CW14 on Wednesday, April 21, at 6 p.m. and Fox 11 on Sunday, April 25, at 5 p.m.

Individuals:

  • Jessica Bernard, Nicolet Elementary School, Graduated in 2007 with B.S., Major: Elementary Education.
  • Chuck Bretl ’88 Algoma Elementary School, Human Development
  • Michael Charles ’10 Wilder Elementary School, M.S.L. in Applied Leadership for Teaching and Learning
  • Dan Dennis ’98 Leonardo da Vinci School for Gifted Learners, Elementary Education
  • Autumn Lensmire ’16, Luxemburg-Casco Primary School, Elementary Education
  • April Neuville ’04, Father Allouez Catholic School, Elementary Education
  • Rachel Stoddard ’06, Luxemburg-Casco High School, Biology
  • Jodi Sullivan ’98, Holy Cross Catholic School, Elementary Education
  • Danielle Wied ’13, Sunnyside Elementary School, Elementary Education

Teams:

Lindsey Hilgemann ’10, Ashwaubenon High School Literacy Team, Graduated in 2010 with a B.A., Major: English, Minor: Secondary Education.

Jayme Shefchik ’06, Bay View Middle School Aquarius Team, Graduated in 2006 with a B.S., Major: Elementary Education, Minor: Psychology.

Mary Swinford, ’00, Bay View Middle School Aquarius Team, Certification in Elementary Education

Karen Kiefer ’97, The Academy Team of N.E.W. School of Innovation, History

Eric Seyler ’04, The Academy Team of N.E.W. School of Innovation, History

Tracy Wiedeman, ’00, Pulaski Community School District Full Online Learning Second Grade Team, Elementary Education.

Ryan Long, ’99, Webster Elementary Fifth-Grade Team, Elementary Education

*Additions or corrections should be sent to the Office of Alumni Relations.

 

Biden moves quickly to show union workers that Democrats care, with Prof. Shelton

“You have more and more Democrats realizing that Trump was able to peel off a lot of blue-collar voters and that you have to do something to empower working people,” said Jon Shelton, a labor historian at the University of Wisconsin Green Bay.

Source: Biden moves quickly to show union workers that Democrats care, Los Angeles Times

Faculty note: Humanities and History lecturer Kevin Kain named Associate of Virtual Open Research Lab

Senior lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanities and History) has been designated as an Associate of Virtual Open Research Laboratory (VORL) program at the Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Center, the University of Illinois in Spring 2021 for his research project “Resurrection ‘New Jerusalem’ Monastery in Reigns of Empresses Elizabeth I and Catherine II: Patronage, Power, Sacralization and Legitimacy.” The VORL provides specialized long-distance library research on Central and East Europe and the Independent States of the former Soviet Union. The VORL is funded in part by the US Department of State through its Title VIII Program, which aims to strengthen U.S. expertise and policy-relevant knowledge about the REEES region.

 

Voyageur Magazine announces Winter/Spring 2021 issue

Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review is pleased to announce the publication of its Winter/Spring 2021 issue, which features 10 articles. Now in its thirty-seventh year of publication, Voyageur is a collaboration between the Brown County Historical Society and the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Published twice a year since 1984, Voyageur is a nonprofit magazine dedicated to preserving the history of a 26-county area of greater Northeast Wisconsin and is edited by Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies, History). Each issue highlights the historic people, places, and events from the region’s past. Further information on Voyageur and the newest issue’s contents can be found by visiting the magazine’s website.

Faculty and staff note: Kevin Kain announces new publications

UW-Green Bay Senior Lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanities, History, Global Studies) has published a set of books co-edited with David Goldfrank (Georgetown U.): Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate 2 vols. 1. Foundations and Mitred Royalty, 1589-1647 and 2. Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Apogee and Finale, 1648-1721(Washington: Academia Press, 2020).

This project originated with a 23,000 Euro grant awarded to Kain and former UWGB International Visiting Scholar Wolfram von Sheleiha (U. Leipzig) by the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung fur Wisssenschaftsfoerderung. The interdisciplinary collection features sixteen chapters by American, Russian and European scholars of history, art history, religious studies and philology. These include Kain’s essay, “The Living Image of Patriarch Nikon: The Life of the Parsuna [Portrait] ‘Patriarch Nikon with Clergy’.”

Commendations on the book jackets include:

“A wide-ranging account … a fundamental contribution to Russian religious history as well as the story of politics, art, and culture in an era of change and crisis.” – Paul Bushkovitch, Reuben Post Halleck Professor of History, Yale University

“A major contribution to our understanding of Russia’s patriarchate, and more generally, the Russian Orthodox Church in the early modern period.” – Russell E. Martin, Associate Professor of History, Westminster College

Here are the descriptions:

Volume 1 Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Foundations and Mitred Royalty, 1589-1647

Focusing on one of Russia’s most powerful and wide-reaching institutions in a period of shattering dynastic crisis and immense territorial and administrative expansion, this book addresses manifestations of religious thought, practice, and artifacts revealing the permeability of political boundaries and fluid transfers of ideas, texts, people, and objects with the rest of the Christian world. The historical background to the establishment Russia’s patriarchate, its chief religious authority, in various eparchies from Late Antiquity sets the stage. Writings such as “The Tale of the Establishment of the Patriarchate,” proved crucial for legitimizing and promoting both this institution and close cooperation with the established tetrarchy of Eastern Orthodox patriarchs. Their attitude remained mixed, however, with persisting unease concerning Russian pretensions to equality. Regarding the most crucial “other” for Christianity’s self-identification, the contradictions inherent in Christianity’s appropriation of the Old Testament became apparent in, for example, the realm’s imperfectly enforced ban on resident Jews. An instance of ordained royalty emerged in the seeming, but really complementary co-rulership of the initial Romanov Tsar Mikhail and his imperious, yet inconsistently xenophobic father, Patriarch Filaret. As a pertinent parallel to Moscow’s patriarchs, and here combining a Romanian regal, Polish aristocratic, and Ukrainian Orthodox self-identity, Petro Mohyla, a metropolitan of the then totally separate Kievan church, founded the Academy which became the most important educational institution for the Russian Orthodox Church into the eighteenth century.

Volume 2 Russia’s Early Modern Orthodox Patriarchate: Apogee and Finale, 1648-1721 

Patriarch Nikon, the most energetic, creative, influential, and obstinate of Russia’s early modern religious leaders, dominates this book, which addresses specifically not only the rich variety of Nikon’s activities and of scholarly interest in him, but also the operations of the patriarchate and range across reform movements and ideology, politics, diplomacy, war, taxation, institutional alms, relic cults, monastery foundation and financing, iconography, architecture, hierotopy, sacral semiotics, portraiture, literature, and education. As head of the Russian Orthodox Church, his most important initiative was to bring Russian religious rituals into line with then current Greek Orthodox practices, from which Russia’s had diverted. Although both Nikon and Tsar Alexis I (r. 1645-1676) envisioned Russia transformed into a new Holy Land, eventually Nikon was accused of challenging the tsar’s authority. His reforms endured, but his poor political judgment appears decisive in his fall and the patriarchate’s reduction in status. Ultimately, the reforms of Peter the Great (r. 1682-1725) led to its replacement by a new, government-controlled body, the Holy Synod, which nevertheless carried out a continuity of Nikon’s policies. This exceptional volume contextualizes Nikon’s patriarchate as part of the broader continuities in Russian history and serves as a bridge through the late Imperial revival of interest in him, to the present, where Russia is forging new relationships between Church and state power.