Common CAHSS

‘The Civil Rights Movement meets the Environmental Movement: How We Can Advocate for Environmental Justice’

Green Bay, Wis.—University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

“As I see protests in 2020 bringing many of the environmental justice crises into a bigger public discussion, I hope we can think beyond traditional environmental and sustainability challenges and really start addressing the core issues of racism that magnify existing environmental problems,” Wheat says.

Wheat is the second in a speaker series brought to both campus and community as part of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences 2020-21 theme, “Beyond Sustainability.” Professor David J. Voelker (Humanities, History), co-chair and program director said this theme is especially timely…

“The Covid-19 pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, which have cast intense light on the challenges that we face as a society, provide especially poignant contexts to address the theme of ‘Beyond Sustainability: Imagining an Ecological Future,’” Voelker says. “We need a more robust framework than “environmental sustainability” to address the interrelated environmental and social crises that we now face. The word ‘environment’ draws a line of separation between humans and the rest of the community of life. We have been talking about sustainability for decades, but we’ve made little progress on addressing unsustainability,” Voelker said. “I hope that the conference theme helps us as a community to imagine something beyond ‘environmental sustainability’—an ecologically sound and just society.”

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science will also host a virtual week around the theme, Nov. 30, 2020 through December 4, 2020.

Prof. Wheat to lead environmental justice/civil rights presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Elizabeth Wheat will discuss environmental justice and its relationship to civil rights in a presentation, Thursday, Oct. 22 at 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public and can be accessed at https://cahsseffect.org/events/.

According to the event description, Wheat will be diving into the environmental justice movement in the United States that began in 1982 when residents of Warren County, North Carolina, used non-violent tactics to oppose the siting of a toxic PCB landfill in their mainly African American community. Decades later, Sheila Holt described her family’s health struggles after the government of Dickson, Tennessee, protected white families from polluted drinking water but told her and other Black families that the water was safe. She inspired countless of other people to think of environmental issues as human rights issues that must be addressed through confronting systemic racism.

Video: Pestilence and Print History recorded event

On September 17, 2020, a virtual public program called Pestilence and Print History organized by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) in Massachusetts took place. UW-Green Bay’s own assistant professor Sarah Schuetze (English) was one of the speakers during the event.

In this panel presentation, scholars David Paul Nord, Assistant Prof. Sarah Schuetze, and Kelly Wisecup examined case studies of epidemics in early America through the lens of printed material to answer questions such as: How did people get information about epidemics and pandemics? Who was providing that information, for what purposes, and in what print mediums? Who had access to these resources? How did people respond to them? From diphtheria to yellow fever to cholera, from medical practitioners to Indigenous writers to ordinary citizens, these case studies spanning 150 years provoke thoughtful insights into how Americans have responded to disease, past, and present. More than 200 people attended the event via Zoom. The presentation and discussion can be viewed on the AAS youtube channel.

Faculty note: Kevin Kain publication

Senior Lecturer Kevin Kain, (Humanties and History) announced the appearance of his article, “Conceptualizing New Jerusalem. The Resurrection of the Resurrection ‘New Jerusalem’ Monastery in the Reign of Tsar Fedor Alekseevich (1676-1682)” Canadian-American Slavic Studies 54 nos. 1-3 (2020): 134-169. The volume  is devoted to “Rethinking Religion in Early Modern Russia” and comprises work of ten international scholars invited to Yale University to discuss the same theme in  April 2017. The program was sponsored by Yale Macmillian Center (European Studies Council) and funded by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation.

School’s In: How college students are adapting to changes in their lives | WFRV talks to Prof. Voelker

(WFRV) – School’s in for the fall semester, but how are college students adjusting to the changes that are in effect around campus? Local 5 talked to a NWTC nursing student, UW-Green Bay Prof. David Voelker and other college officials to get a better picture of what students are facing when heading to campus this fall. Check out the full segment…

Live Interview with UWGB Professor on Virtual learning

Chelly Boutott talked with UWGB Professor David Voelker, who specializes in humanities and history at the University. He talked about how virtual teaching has been going for him and his students since the beginning of the semester.

He also highlighted some of the things that he has done for his students to make the online environment a little more tolerable and easier to understand the information.

Source: School’s In: How college students are adapting to changes in their lives | WFRV Local 5 – Green Bay, Appleton

Faculty note: Senior Lecturer Kevin Kain to continue international research, part of large grant

Senior Lecturer Kevin Kain (Humanities and History) is a member of an international research project entitled “Orthodoxies and Politics” awarded a $1,450,000.00 grant by the European Research Council. Former UWGB Visiting International Scholar Ovidiu-Victor Olar (Austrian Academy of Sciences) is the principal investigator. The project will investigate the religious reforms of Early Modern Eastern and South-Eastern Europe and run from 2022 through 2026. Kain will conduct and present archival research on the “Nikonian reforms” and conception of “New Jerusalem” in seventeenth-century Russia. He  will receive research and writing stipends, travel funding to Russia and Europe as well as a book contract with the publishing house of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

 

Faculty note: Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies and History) Featured in Business Insider Podcast

Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies and History) is featured in this week’s episode of Business Insider’s podcast, “Brought To You By…” The episode explores the story of the Polaroid Corporation’s engagement with South Africa and apartheid during the 1970s. “What responsibilities do corporations have to support social justice, democracy, and human rights?” Morgan asks. “It’s about the influence that individuals can have, in this case the Polaroid Revolutionary Workers Movement and its supporters, in putting pressure on large, powerful organizations.” The podcast’s host, Charlie Herman, learned about Polaroid and South Africa after reading Morgan’s article on the subject, which was published in Enterprise & Society: The International Journal of Business History.

Faculty note: Associate Prof. Reilly publishes book on the 1920s United States

UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Kimberley Reilly (DJS, History, Women’s and Gender Studies) has published a book, The Politics of Prosperity: Mass Consumer Culture in the 1920s, with Oxford University Press. The book is part of the “Debating American History” series, edited by David J. Voelker (UW-Green Bay) and Joel M. Sipress (UW-Superior), which allows students to consider competing interpretations of the past using primary source evidence. Reilly’s book helps students to debate the question, “did mass consumer culture empower Americans in the 1920s?”

Emily Miller and Mackenzie Ringer take first place in the UW-Green Bay Liberal Arts Essay Contest

Twenty-five students submitted essays and two students claimed the top prizes and a scholarship for the annual Liberal Arts Scholarship Essay contest. The Selection Committee was composed of Rebecca Abler, Vicki Medland, Chris Williams and Xan Bozzo. The essays will be published in the Sheepshead Review.

The first-year award went to Emily Miller (Psychology/Spanish). The committee had this to say about the essay:

“Miller’s essay was particularly strong to the committee as she was able to weave a broad understanding of the liberal arts, starting with the Yale Report of 1828, into her own personal experiences at UW-Green Bay. Her reflection as a reluctant gen-ed student who learned to appreciate how the liberal arts was enhancing her education and goals was particularly impressive. The quote, “In macroeconomics, I learned psychology; after all, the basis of economics is the human behavior which drives us to make purchases” was one that stood out.”

The second award, presented to a second- through fourth-year student, went to sophomore Mackenzie Ringer (History). The Committee wrote this:

“Ringer’s essay deftly makes the case for a liberal arts education as crucial to preparation of society for fluid, ever-changing circumstances. It analyzes the criticisms of liberal arts education and refutes those criticisms, making the case that while job and career trends can rise and fall, liberal arts provides the fundamental background needed to respond to a dynamic world. She includes the quick response of universities, specifically UW-Green Bay, to the COVID-19 pandemic as an illustrative example of how those with liberal arts values can respond quickly to changes.  Ringer acknowledges the challenges inherent in the rising cost of a college education and makes the case for addressing those in order to continue to provide equitable education for all.”