UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News

UW-Green Bay Profs. Brian Merkel (Human Biology), Christine Vandenhouten (Nursing and Global Studies) and Rebecca Hovarter (Nursing) are organizing a presentation on the Coronavirus, which will feature a multidisciplinary look at the virus. The event is on Thursday, March 5, 2020 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the Christie Theatre on the UW-Green Bay Campus. More via UW-Green Bay preparing to host presentation on Coronavirus | Seehafer News. 

Join the Healthy Heart Lunch ‘n Learn, Friday, Feb. 8

Can you save a life? It’s as simple as the push of a button. Please join the Healthy Heart Lunch ‘n Learn on Friday, Feb. 8, 2019 from 12 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Alumni Room of the UW-Green Bay’s University Union, and get a crash course on how to use the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) and learn other simple life saving tips from Public Safety Officer Dave Jones. The Healthy Heart Challenge will also kick off on Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, where you can find the AED’s around campus, unscramble as many heart health-related words as you can and then submit your worksheet to get your name in the drawing for a wellness prize.

‘Living with Diabetes’ community presentation to take place at UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus, Thursday, Nov. 29

The community presentation “Living with Diabetes” will take place on Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018 at 7 p.m. in Room M-117 on the UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus. Living most of her life with Type 1 Diabetes, UW-Green Bay, Marinette Campus student Jordan Miller will be speaking from her experience, alongside Diabetic Educator Nola Hardy (Aurora Health Care) and UW-Green Bay employee Aubrey Schramm and her daughter Ciri. The presentation will engage attendees about assumptions and misconceptions while they learn about the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. This presentation is free and open to the public. Watch this video featuring Miller, and the breakthroughs that have allowed her, and her family members, to live with Diabetes.

Reminder: Please dispose of batteries properly

Instruction for the disposal of different kind of batteries is as follows: Alkaline batteries are composed primarily of common metals — steel, zinc and manganese — and do not pose a health or environmental risk during normal use or disposal. Proven cost-effective and environmentally safe recycling processes are not yet universally available for alkaline batteries. Battery types include AAA, AA, A, C, D and 9 volt. Disposal: May be placed in normal trash for disposal. Do not dispose of large amounts (more than 3 or 4 handfuls) of alkaline batteries in the trash. Contact Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu if you have large amounts of alkaline batteries for disposal.

Button batteries still contain small amounts of mercury and should be recycled through the state’s hazardous waste disposal contractor. Disposal: Place button batteries between two layers of clear packing tape. Place in campus mail to Jill Fermanich, Business & Finance. Rechargeable batteries: The most common types of rechargeable batteries are nickel cadmium (Ni-Cd); nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH);and lithium (Li-ion). Disposal: Tape all battery terminals. Contact Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu for disposal. Lead acid batteries: These are not regulated as hazardous waste as long as they are recycled. Used lead acid batteries may be returned to vendor where purchased at no cost for recycling. Battery vendors are required to accept the spent batteries when a new battery is purchased. Disposal: Contact Mike VanLanen (vanlanem@uwgb.edu) in Facilities Management for disposal.

For disposal of other batteries or for disposal of any material for which you have questions, please call or email Jill Fermanich at 2273 or fermanij@uwgb.edu.

Well Wisconsin Webinar Feb. 21, including earning your $150 incentive

Make this the year of focusing on your health and well-being. Learn about about the 2018 Well Wisconsin Program and the resources available, including how to earn the $150 incentive, at the Well Wisconsin Webinar. The webinar is presented on Wednesday, Feb. 21 from Noon to 12:30 p.m. in Room 735 of the Cofrin Library. No need to RSVP, just mark your calendar and bring a lunch. The webinar is also available online at wellwisconsin.staywell.com under Wellness Webinars.

Flu vaccine still available

The Counseling and Health Center, SS1400, is offering Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (trivalent) to all Faculty/Staff and Students by appointment only. Set up your appointment by having your campus ID# or Faculty/Staff ID# available, (it’s the one on your ID card that starts with 6017200… then only need the last 9 digits), then calling the Counseling and Health Center at 920-465-2380. The cost is $20 for faculty and staff.

Texting-while-driving simulator comes to campus Thursday

The state of Wisconsin marks the fifth anniversary of its texting while driving ban this week, and UW-Green Bay students will get a firsthand opportunity to learn about the dangers of smartphone activities while driving with a special simulator at the Kress Events Center this Thursday (Dec. 3) at 3 p.m. Students will be able to experience the national AT&T “It Can Wait” virtual reality simulator, visiting Green Bay as part of a nationwide tour to raise awareness about the dangers of distracted driving.

New on campus: An Overeaters Anonymous chapter

Beginning Wednesday, Dec. 2, Overeaters Anonymous will meet at the Mauthe Center every Wednesday from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.  “We welcome everyone who wants to stop eating compulsively.  OA is not just about weight loss, weight gain, maintenance, obesity, or diets.  It is a Twelve Step program addressing physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.”  Feel free to share or just come to listen.  For more information, visit http://oamilwaukee.org/index.html or contact Kari at 920-609-1591.

Reminder: Hmong perspective on public health, tonight


Chua Xiong, director of the Brown County Department of Public Health, will speak about public health issues and the Hmong community today (Nov 2) from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in MAC Hall Room 223. She is the first Hmong public health director in the state. The talk is sponsored by the Hmong Studies Center.