Weidner Philharmonic @ Green Bay Botanical Garden – Green Bay News Network

The Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is heading to the Green Bay Botanical Garden to bring Weidner Philharmonic back to the stage as its members perform “Walton’s Façade: An Entertainment” on Sunday, May 23, 2021 at 3 p.m. in the Billie Kress Amphitheatre. In order to comply with safety policies, the concert will implement staggered admissions and socially distanced seating.  Masks will be mandatory for concert attendees when moving from one location to another outside or inside any buildings. “Walton’s Facade: An Entertainment” is an exciting series of poems by Edith Sitwell (1887-1964), accompanied by instrumentals composed by William Walton (1902-1983). Despite being highly controversial for its absurdist avant-garde nature upon its debut in 1922, Walton’s Façade: An Entertainment survived its notoriety to become an essential tongue in cheek classic.

Source: Weidner Philharmonic @ Green Bay Botanical Garden – Green Bay News Network

Weidner Philharmonic plans outdoor concert | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

GREEN BAY, Wis. — The Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is heading to the Green Bay Botanical Garden to bring Weidner Philharmonic back to the stage as its members perform “Walton’s Facade: An Entertainment” at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 23, in the Billie Kress Amphitheatre.This concert will mark the Weidner Center’s first in-person live performance in more than a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Source: Weidner Philharmonic plans outdoor concert | News, Sports, Jobs – The Daily news

Weidner Center’s first in-person concert in more than a year will be outside at Green Bay Botanical Garden | Green Bay Press-Gazette

The Weidner Center’s first in-person concert in more than a year will come this spring at Green Bay Botanical Garden. The Weidner Philharmonic will perform “Walton’s Facade: An Entertainment” at 3 p.m. May 23 at the garden’s Billie Kress Amphitheater, 2600 Larsen Road.

Source: Weidner Center’s first in-person concert in more than a year will be outside at Green Bay Botanical Garden | Green Bay Press-Gazette

Weidner Philharmonic Heads to Green Bay Botanical Garden for Outdoor Concert

Weidner Center Invites Audiences to First In-Person Event in More Than a Year

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE [April 5, 2021]

 GREEN BAY – The Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is heading to Green Bay Botanical Gardento bring Weidner Philharmonic back to the stage as they perform “Walton’s Façade: An Entertainment” on Sunday, May 23, 2021 at 3:00pm in the Billie Kress Amphitheatre.

This concert will mark the Weidner Center’s first in-person live performance in over a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “We greatly look forward to gathering together in the beautiful surroundings of the Green Bay Botanical Garden for a spring concert. We have been unable to welcome audiences into our facility since March 12, 2020 so this will be a gift for our musicians and our audiences. We are especially excited for the Weidner Philharmonic to play Walton’s Façade, full of so much humor, whimsy and surprise,” said the Weidner Center’s Executive and Artistic Director Kelli Strickland.

In order to comply with safety policies, the concert will implement staggered admissions and socially distanced seating.  Masks will be mandatory for concert attendees when moving from one location to another outside or inside any buildings. View more on the Green Bay Botanical Garden’s COVID-19 policies at gbbg.org/coronavirus/.

Beverage concessions will be available for purchase. The Green Bay Botanical Garden invites concert goers to pack a picnic to enjoy in the gardens. Beverage carry-ins are not allowed. Please refer to the Green Bay Botanical Garden’s website for more information on visitor policies.

“Walton’s Façade: An Entertainment” is an exciting series of poems by Edith Sitwell (1887-1964), accompanied by instrumentals composed by William Walton (1902-1983). Despite being highly controversial for its absurdist avant-garde nature upon its debut in 1922, Walton’s Façade: An Entertainment survived its notoriety to become an essential tongue in cheek classic.

Featured Weidner Philharmonic performers include: Kortney James (Flute), Rich Tengowski (Clarinet), Sam Stranz (Saxophone), Adam Gaines (Trumpet), Michael Dewhirst (Cello) and Bill Sallak (Percussion). With narration by Courtney Sherman joined by a surprise guest narrator, under the direction of Randy Meder.

Tickets go on sale Tuesday, April 6, 2021 at 10:00 a.m. and can be purchased at ticketstaronline.com or by calling Ticket Star at 1-800-895-0071. 

About the Weidner Philharmonic

Buoyed by the strong community response to the orchestral concert that opened its 25th anniversary season in 2018, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay music faculty and UW-Green Bay’s Weidner Center for the Performing Arts, announced the establishment of the Weidner Philharmonic. The Weidner Philharmonic will showcase the talents of UW-Green Bay music faculty, as well as other accomplished orchestral musicians who live and work in the region, in the outstanding acoustical environment of Cofrin Family Hall.

 

About the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts

UW-Green Bay’s Weidner Center for the Performing Arts is known for its elegant design and the acoustic excellence of its 2,000-seat main hall, Cofrin Family Hall. It also houses two smaller performance spaces, the Fort Howard recital hall and the Jean Weidner Theatre, along with a dance studio and Grand Foyer. The Weidner Center has a distinct benefit in being part of a leading institution of higher learning. The Center is a home for UW-Green Bay Music and Theatre and Dance programs, community events and productions, and performances by visiting artists and touring companies. Beyond the large-scale touring productions that grace the stage, the Weidner Center also focuses on scholastic development, programming and an impactful education series — Stage Doors. For more information on the Weidner Center, visit www.WeidnerCenter.com, 920-465-2726, 800-895-0071, or follow ‘Weidner Center f

Campus mourns passing of one-time team physician and lifetime supporter, Dr. Jeremy Green

Campus mourns the passing of Dr. Jeremy Green, who passed away on January 10, 2021 just weeks shy of his 89th birthday. Dr. Green was a physician in the Green Bay Area, and served as a team physician for UW-Green Bay athletics. He and his wife Elizabeth, have been longtime supporters of UW-Green Bay.

According to his obituary, “Throughout his life, he was passionate about giving back to the profession and community that had been ‘so good to him and his family.’ He was an active volunteer with the Medical Societies of Brown County and the State of Wisconsin, the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary and Botanical Gardens, the N.E.W. Community Clinic, and Scholarships Inc. He was a strong believer in the importance of higher education, and so he dedicated much time and energy to helping the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay become more vibrant and successful. He helped establish UWGB Health Services and served as an advisor for both health services and the College of Human Biology for many years. He even served as a team physician for the men’s basketball and soccer teams.

“He received numerous awards for service to his community and profession, from the UWGB Chancellor’s Award for Lifetime Service, to the State Medical Society’s Physician-Citizen of the Year Award, and countless honors in between.”

“At the time of his retirement from active practice in May 2017, he was Wisconsin’s longest serving physician, and had mentored countless doctors and nurses who hoped to emulate the extraordinary sense of compassion that was at the heart of his approach to health care.”

Funeral services for Jeremy Green will be private and limited to family due to COVID restrictions. Later this year, the Greens plan to celebrate his life with a ceremony that will be open to all friends and family, including his family and relatives around the world.

See the full obituary.

UW-Green Bay alumnus gives insight on moths as the key to saving forest in Glencoe | Chicago Tribune

UW-Green Bay alumnus, Jim Steffen (Environmental Science and Biology), “the Mothman of Glencoe, the champion of McDonald Woods, a Chicago Botanic Garden ecologist for the past 30 years, as well as the co-author of such must-reads as ‘Interactions of an Introduced Shrub and Introduced Earthworms in an Illinois Urban Woodland,'” gives insight as to how moths are beneficial to saving the McDonald Woods in Illinois. More via “To people, they’re a nuisance,” but to Jim ‘Mothman’ Steffen, the insects are the key to saving a 100-acre forest in Glencoe | Chicago Tribune.

Bookworms dig in with visit to magical garden

“A 3-year-old’s temper tantrum can get old pretty fast. But I’ll give a preschooler a little slack for a ‘I don’t wanna leave!’ meltdowns now that I’ve seen what all the fuss is about. This story is about Bookworm Gardens, just a minute from the UW-Green Bay, Sheboygan Campus.

Bookworm Gardens is a magical place. And as word continues to spread about the $2.8 million project, those who run the combination of a botanical garden and children’s library can expect a lot more visitors and probably a few more tantrums.”

See more via Bookworms dig in with visit to magical garden | State and Regional | chippewa.com.

Make a Difference Day Volunteers

Photos: UW-Green Bay volunteers more than 700 hours for Make a Difference Day

Congratulations to the organizers and participants who made a big difference in the community last Friday (Oct. 26, 2018). UW-Green Bay volunteers totaled 719 hours of service at 18 various sites. On campus, volunteers made 180 cards for disabled veterans through the TRIO Program, picked up garbage, painted, helped with plastic film recycling and cleaned the shoreline. Off-campus projects included garden cleanup, bulb planting and organizing for the Festival of Lights at the Green Bay Botanical Garden; yard work, cleaning and more for the New Community Shelter; and helping the NEW Zoo get ready for Zoo Boo.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

Make a Difference Day 2018

– Photos by Liesl Sigourney and Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Mission accomplished

UW-Green Bay students help nonprofits measure their good works

There was palpable excitement entering Lora Warner’s Government and Nonprofit classroom last semester. Her students were actively engaged with local Nonprofits through service learning; visiting sites, getting their “hands dirty” and evaluating each program to determine the best ways to measure and communicate the Nonprofits mission and success before formally presenting their recommendations directly to their professional Nonprofit partners. Why? Because for each Nonprofit organization, it is becoming increasingly important to stakeholders and donors to know that their time is well-spent and their financial contributions are making a difference.

Delivering value to the mission

The Green Bay Botanical Gardens, CP Center, Curative Connections, The Farmory and The Birder Studio ARTreach program were nonprofits that received help from UW-Green Bay in spring 2018. Take ARTreach, an organization that partners with the YMCA’s after-school program at Green Bay area elementary schools deemed “at-risk,” as an example. As part of the program, K-5 students work with high school mentors and a program leader to experience music, art, theater and more importantly, life skills like self confidence, public speaking and working together. The program brings art to life for kids who may never have the opportunity to be part of an arts-themed program.

However, measuring the success of the program, things like increased confidence and problem-solving skills can be difficult. “It’s been really exciting,” says ARTreach Coordinator Peggy McGee. “We know what we do works — we can see the benefits — but having the UW-Green Bay students here to provide research and organize the numbers into something we can communicate to benefit our program, is so fantastic.”

In the foreground, from left to right, UW-Green Bay students Jessica Pittner ’18, Carly Newhouse ’18 and Tessah Dolata from Prof. Lora Warner’s “Program Evaluation” class, evaluated The Birder School ARTreach program to determine best ways to measure and communicate its success. The after-school participants took a photo break during dress rehearsal for a future Wizard of Oz performance.
In the foreground, from left to right, UW-Green Bay students Jessica Pittner ’18, Carly Newhouse ’18 and Tessah Dolata from Prof. Lora Warner’s “Program Evaluation” class, evaluated The Birder School ARTreach program to determine best ways to measure and communicate its success. The after-school participants took a photo break during dress rehearsal for a future Wizard of Oz performance.

Community plus campus yields valuable partnership

This unique way of involving student and community is developed from Prof. Warner’s strong background in program evaluation. “Program evaluation helps measure the impact you’re having on the people in your program,” says Warner. “There’s something called the double bottom line; there’s financials, but then there’s the mission, the reason organizations receive donations — to accomplish good for the people that are part of the program.” Lack of staff, budget and time constraints can make it difficult for nonprofits to determine how to best show their success and measure their impact. Outcome measurement can have a profound impact on community philanthropic support, volunteers and overall participation in each program.

In this partnership, local nonprofits have the benefit of utilizing fresh, intelligent and innovative ideas to develop impactful metrics and useful measurement tools. Teams of students observe the nonprofits, meet directly with leaders to learn about organization mission and vision, research best practices and then combine this with their knowledge of program evaluation theory to determine outcomes and develop a model that can be utilized by the organization. The direct application makes it more “real” for each student, which impacts their perception of the local nonprofit landscape.

Adding value to the community

Warner has also observed the additional benefits of understanding outcome measurement and program evaluation through hands-on service learning; students in her classes are learning self-confidence, conflict management skills, critical thinking, and problem-solving. “They’re learning skills that are in high demand,” says Warner. “Program evaluation is something that employers want across all disciplines.” More importantly, students are developing into future employees that are well-prepared and able to effectively communicate their ideas and results.

Students within the program concur. They enjoy the non-traditional style of the class and are happy to share their insights. They speak about gaining empathy, humility, increased knowledge about the community, volunteerism and being a part of something that they may never have been exposed to otherwise, as takeaways from the class. “It’s so much more applicable to what I’m going to experience out in the real world,” says Carly Newhouse ’18, a senior working towards an Arts Management degree. “I’ve learned so much more because it’s not just a lecture.”

Ensuring these millennials are prepared for their future and able to give back to the community is exactly what Warner had envisioned. “This ultimately benefits the whole community in two ways. We’re preparing the future nonprofit and public serving employees to be comfortable and well-prepared,” she says. The nonprofits become more accountable. “They learn with us. And in turn, develop better evaluation methods, are more accountable to their donors, and in turn raise more money…becoming even more effective.”

Final grade? A+

The presentation complete, questions asked and answered, the students happily relax to let their peers take their turn. Peggy McGee is poised to take the students’ recommendations for ARTreach and move this program forward, utilizing the outcome measures outlined. Already, she’s seen the positive effect this unique and valuable project has left on the kids involved in ARTreach. “For students in these schools to see others invest in them by observing and interacting, makes them feel valuable…that people are interested in who they are,” adds McGee.

Mission definitely accomplished.

This story by Kristin Bouchard ‘93 originally appear in the Spring/Summer issue of Inside Magazine