First German Honor Society inductees named

This year, UW-Green Bay was granted a new chapter of Delta Phi Alpha, the national German Honor Society. Founded in 1929, Delta Phi Alpha recognizes students with a minimum 3.3 GPA in college-level German courses. This spring, UW-Green Bay inducted eight members as its first and initial cohort: Alex Alberts, Ross Cox, Caitlin Curtis, Miranda Esser, Danielle Jaeger, Peyton Larscheid, Olivia Nichter and Savannah Schemenauer. Congratulations!

Professers Coen and Coury write about ‘political implications of pandemic language’

UW-Green Bay professors Alise Coen (Political Science, Public & Environmental Affairs) and David Coury (Humanities and German, Global Studies) combined their expertise across disciplines to write about the political implications of pandemic language. See CAHSS and Effect for their piece, Political Talk: The Political Implications of Pandemic Language.

German exchange student Theresa Werner interviewed about online learning at UW-Green Bay

UW-Green Bay international student, Theresa Werner, was interviewed by SWR German radio about life in Green Bay during the Corona pandemic. Werner, from Kassel Germany, has been studying at UW-Green Bay for the year and has opted, so far, to stay here to finish the academic year. She talks about restriction in our daily life as well as online learning at UW-Green Bay (in German). | SWR aktuell |March 31, 2020

Faculty note: Professors Ortiz and Coury contribute to volume of essays

Professors Cristina Ortiz (Spanish and Humanities) and David Coury (German and Humanities) are contributors to a new volume of essays: “Resistiendo al Imperio: nuevas aproximaciones al antiamericanismo desde el siglo XX hasta la actualidad” (Resisting the Empire: New Approaches to Anti-Americanism from the 20th Century to the Present), published in Spain by Silex and edited by faculty members from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). Ortiz’s contribution is entitled “Partial Portraits: Visions of the United States from the Perspective of Basque Nationalism,” while Coury’s contribution is “A New Cultural Clash? Populism and American Cosmopolitanism.” The book is the product of a two-year research collaboration of scholars based in Madrid and jointly funded by the UAM and Banco Santander.

UW-Green Bay student Alexander Alberts selected as a Study Abroad Ambassador for the German government

UW-Green Bay student Alexander Alberts (Accounting, Business Administration and German), has been selected as one of the German Academic Exchange Service Young Ambassadors for the 2019-2020 academic year. The Green Bay-area native (Ashwaubenon) is currently attending a workshop in New York to prepare, working on public speaking and methods to motivate students to study abroad in Germany.

Young Ambassadors are undergraduate students and master’s students from North America who recently studied abroad in Germany and promote study in Germany at their home universities. They help to inspire their fellow students by giving them useful tips on how to enjoy and make use of their own stay in Germany. Alberts is in his fifth and final year at UW-Green Bay and has career aspirations to work at an international company and spend some time working and living abroad in Germany. His specific interests include international sales, business systems and international accounting, and he hopes to spend time teaching English abroad in Germany.

Faculty note: Prof. Coury paper presentation

UW-Green Bay Prof. David Coury (Humanities, German and Global Studies) presented the paper “Do not disturb my circles! Literary and Cinematic Encounters with Refugees” at the 16th International Conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas (ISSEI) at the University of Zaragoza, Spain. This year’s theme for the biannual conference was “Aftershocks: Globalism and the Future of Democracy.”

Scholarship recipients from Humanities announced

UW-Green Bay Humanities announces its 2019 scholarship recipients, recognized at a Scholarship Awards Ceremony with Humanities faculty, Friday, May 10, 2019:

Alex Alberts (German and Accounting), received the Thomas E. Daniels Memorial Scholarship, available to students majoring in either English or Modern Languages.

Preston Fischer (English and History), was presented with a certificate of honorable mention.

Emily Gerlikovski (English and Communication), received the Lise Lotte Gammeltoft Scholarship, available to declared majors in the Humanities and associated disciplines.

Faith Klick (English and Theater), received the Coryl Crandall Memorial Scholarship, available to declared majors or minors in Humanities and its related disciplinary majors.

Eliot Klutz (Philosophy and English), received the Lise Lotte Gammeltoft Scholarship, available to declared majors in the Humanities and associated disciplines.

Coleton LaBarre (German, History, and the Humanities-Ancient/Medieval emphasis), received the Eugene Cruz-Uribe Annual Memorial Scholarship for Historical Studies, available to declared majors in History.

Emily Rotzenberg (History), received the Arnold Lelis Memorial Scholarship, available to students majoring in Humanities or History.

Rachel Scray (History and Humanities-Digital and Public), received the Harold and Edna Memorial Scholarship, available to declared majors or minors in Humanities and its related disciplinary majors.

“The Humanities faculty extend their sincere congratulations to these hard-working and most deserving students!”

Next Great Decisions lecture set for Wednesday (April 3)

The next Great Decisions lecture will be this Wednesday, April 3, 2019 at 6:30 p.m. in the Alumni Room located in the UW-Green Bay’s University Union. Prof. David Coury (Humanities, German and Global Studies) will speak on the rise of populism in Europe. Mass migration, and the problems associated with it, have directly contributed to the rise of populist parties in Europe. Opposition to immigration was the prime driver of support for Brexit, it brought a far-right party to the German Bundestag for the first time since the 1950s, and propelled Marine Le Pen to win a third of the vote in the French presidential election. This discussion will look at the causes and consequences of this new populism in Europe. Free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by St. Norbert College.