Wisconsin Aluminum Founder Ceo Sachin Shivaran Follows An Unconventional Path

To help enhance its talent attraction efforts in the longer term, WAF recently donated $100,000 to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the UW-Green Bay Foundation. The Schwartz family, who has owned and operated the company since its founding in 1909, supported the endeavor. The scholarship is available to graduates of any Manitowoc County high school.

Source: Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry CEO Sachin Shivaram Follows An Unconventional Path, Insight

STEM Center Engineering Equipment

WAF donates $100,000 to create new UWGB engineering scholarship fund to assist Manitowoc county high school graduates

Released Jan. 15, 2021 from Cole Buergi, Leonard & Finco Public Relations

Manitowoc, Wis.—Manitowoc county high school graduates planning to attendUW-Green Bay, may have an opportunity for financial support through a new scholarship fund created by Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry (WAF), with support of the Schwartz family who has owned and operated the company since its founding in 1909.

WAF has donated $100,000 to create the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship fund through the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay Foundation.

“We’re thrilled to help the next generation realize the opportunities available in the manufacturing industry,” said Berel Lutsky, WAF board member and a Professor of Arts at the UW-Green Bay, Manitowoc Campus. “The foundry’s success is due to the hard work and dedication of its team members, the community and surrounding area. This is an opportunity for us to invest in the future of our region.”

“This fund is an incredible opportunity for the Manitowoc area students; providing a scholarship source to help them earn engineering degrees at the university,” stated UWGB Chancellor Michael Alexander. “We’re grateful to Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry and the Schwartz family’s support as the university continues to grow and meet our area’s need for engineers.”

Manufacturing is a leading industry in Northeast Wisconsin and, as many within the workforce approach retirement, there is a shortage of new engineers to meet manufacturers’ needs. “As we look to the future, it’s important to prepare the next generation with the skills needed for companies such as ours to continue to flourish,” explains WAF CEO Sachin Shivaram. “It’s also a way for us to invest in the community and to show that there are great career opportunities right here in this region.”

Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Engineering Scholarship eligibility requirements:

  1. Recipients must be a graduate of a high school in Manitowoc county. These include:
    • Kiel High School
    • Lincoln High School
    • Manitowoc Lutheran
    • McKinley Academy
    • Mishicot High School
    • Reedsville High School
    • Roncalli High School
    • Two Rivers High School
    • Valders High School
  2. Recipients must major in either Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology.
  3. Must be admitted to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay as a degree-seeking undergraduate student.
  4. Must demonstrate financial need.
  5. Must be pursuing a major in mechanical engineering or mechanical engineering technology.
  6. Scholarship is renewable for up to three additional years.

For more information, or to apply for a scholarship, please visit: www.uwgb.edu/scholarships.

About Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry:

Founded in 1909, Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry is an industry leader in aluminum and copper-based alloy castings for a variety of industries. Headquartered in Manitowoc, Wis., the family-owned company is known for its All-American line of cookware and for its support of the local community. For more information, visit www.wafco.com.

Media Contacts:

Cole Buergi, Leonard & Finco Public Relations
(920) 619-4400
cbuergi@lfpublicrelations.com

Commencement speaker, Prof. Patricia Terry, noted for ‘Iron-man worthy’ efforts on behalf of the University

Patricia TerryAs a tenured professor approaching her 25th year at UW-Green Bay, professor Patricia Terry describes herself as a “pinnacle person.” Which means, if you’re going to do something, take it all the way.

“If you’re going to run, run a marathon. Go to college? Get a Ph.D. Work at a university? Achieve the rank of full professor.”

She will bring her experience and wisdom to the stage on Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019 when she serves as the University’s commencement speaker.

Terry has done marathons one better by competing in Ironman triathlons—one of the world’s most difficult events—swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles and then run a full marathon. “They fire the starting gun at 7 a.m. and you have until midnight to finish.” She’s completed three. (Also managing to squeeze in two Boston Marathons, two fifty-mile races, and more than 30 other marathons or ultra-marathons along the way).

Her career in academia began even sooner, when her father once offered his “exalted” (her description) advice to his eight-year-old daughter.

“I asked him, ‘who teaches college?’ He said ‘college professors.’ Then he added ‘If you became a college professor, you’d be one of the most honored, revered and respected members of society.’”

“I bring that up to him every chance I get.”

And while her CV is a testament to her scholarly work-ethic with dozens of peer-reviewed published papers, research grants and co-authorship of Principles of Chemical Separations with Environmental Applications, published by Cambridge University Press, it’s her collaboration with faculty and students that has brought her the greatest pleasure.

“What I’m most passionate about was starting the engineering program and leading my faculty, facilitating student success.”

Terry also discovered she had a knack for growing things—from wildflowers to academic flowers. In 2009, one of her students suggested, as a thesis project, replacing the under-performing grass roof over the Instructional Services building with native plants. The student never finished, but true to her pinnacle person personality, Terry persisted. Today, she solely supports a fund to hire students for maintenance and to purchase plants. Over the past seven years, she has gifted the fund approximately $15,000.

Ultimately, Terry’s most sustainable contribution to the University is her Ironman-worthy efforts to the success of students, faculty and the university. She was instrumental in helping launch the new bachelor of science programs in Electrical, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering Technology, becoming director of the programs in 2012.

As far as a “pinnacle” to her academic career to this point, it may be her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Resch School of Engineering. As the administrator overseeing the program, Terry helped set the curriculum and was in charge of faculty recruitment and mentoring, along with ensuring program accreditation.

Still, she remains a teacher of environmental engineering at heart. Or as she puts it—“Everything’s a chemical. We’re moving chemicals.” And as far as staying on the move goes, Terry confesses a general-education offering remains her favorite class to teach.

“I like teaching Energy and Society. I have to keep up with the news, that class changes every semester. It’s a moving content target.”

Story by Michael Shaw, Marketing and University Communication

Taiwanese technology company to employ UW-Green Bay graduates in the future

Foxconn Technology Company is opening an innovation center downtown Green Bay near the Fox River. Foxconn will employ about 200 people, and is hoping to develop and employ talent from UW-Green Bay, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, St. Norbert College and others. Read the full story in Urban Milwaukee.

UW-Green Bay Announces Lead Gifts for Region’s STEM Vision

Richard J. Resch Foundation and Wisconsin Public Service Foundation Contributions Will Expedite Development of STEM Resources and Mechanical Engineering Degree

GREEN BAY – On the heels of Friday’s unanimous UW System Board of Regents approval of a Mechanical Engineering program and other critical components of a University-Community shared vision for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) at UW-Green Bay, the University and two community partners today shared additional details on how they plan to quickly move the program from concept to reality, expediting the University’s ability to meet the region’s rising demand for engineering talent.

Richard Resch
Richard Resch

Richard Resch, CEO of international office furniture manufacturer KI, announced his support of UW-Green Bay’s visionary engineering plan with a $5 million gift. The University will name the new school the Richard J. Resch School of Engineering in honor of Resch’s transformational gift.

“I am proud to support UW-Green Bay, one of the pillars of our community, with this gift,” Resch shared. “Everyone at KI, from our product designers and engineers to our sales staff and manufacturing technicians, takes great pride in helping colleges and universities create learning environments that will produce the next generation of leaders and innovators. It’s my sincere hope that this gift will allow UW-Green Bay to do just that.”

The Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) Foundation announced a $1 million contribution to support STEM education — the largest single donation made by the charitable organization in its 54-year history, according to foundation board member and WPS president Kevin Fletcher.

Kevin Fletcher
Kevin Fletcher

“We are very pleased and honored to make this commitment to UW-Green Bay and all of Northeast Wisconsin, and congratulate the university on its establishment of an engineering program as a key component of this initiative,” Fletcher said. “Our company relies heavily on STEM skills to help us serve our communities with safe, reliable energy and outstanding customer service. We are confident our donation will greatly enhance education, foster future investment in the community and lead to economic growth throughout our region.”

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s efforts to establish an in-region resource for developing highly needed mechanical engineering talent took a gigantic step forward on February 9, 2018 when the UW System Board of Regents unanimously approved the University’s request to offer the new program on its campus. The plan also includes establishing a School of Engineering and paves the way for development of Phoenix Innovation Park, a County-developed innovation park on University land, to attract STEM entities to the region. The STEM Center will be the inaugural tenant in the Park.

Brown County STEM Innovation Center Rendering
Brown County STEM Innovation Center Rendering

The STEM Center, the first bricks and mortar building to be built at UW-Green Bay since 2008, will be owned by Brown County and located on the UW-Green Bay campus as part of Phoenix Innovation Park. In addition to the Richard J. Resch School of Engineering, the building will also be home to UW Extension, Brown County Land & Water Conservation and Einstein Project. Brown County and the State of Wisconsin are each contributing $5 million to the construction of the STEM Center.

“We are deeply appreciative to both Dick Resch and the WPS Foundation for supporting this project,” said UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller. “Both gifts represent something special to UW-Green Bay. Dick Resch’s gift is transformational for our university and is one of the largest donations in our history. The WPS Foundation was the first donor to step forward and pledge their support to take this initiative from concept to reality. These two organizations and their donations are a significant gift to the University and the region. Our shared vision and support for STEM is a game changer for Northeast Wisconsin and will create a great legacy for future generations.”

According to Miller, the University has already secured donations totaling more than $7.1 million to support the project. The campaign for Phoenix Innovation Park has been in a “quiet phase” since Summer of 2017. Approval by the Board of Regents allows the University, Brown County and Einstein Project to continue fundraising toward its goal of $13 million for all aspects of the project.

Miller said UW-Green Bay hopes to begin accepting freshman into its Mechanical Engineering program for the Fall 2018 semester. The B.S. in Mechanical Engineering program will be UW-Green Bay’s first four-year engineering program and brings the total of engineering programs offered at the campus to four. Since 2014, the University has collaborated with NWTC to deliver Environmental, Electrical and Mechanical Technology programs.

About the Richard J. Resch Foundation

Founded in 1990, the Richard J. Resch Foundation provides critical financial support for community projects across Green Bay, Brown County and Northeastern Wisconsin. Over the years, the Foundation has pledged millions in support of education, health and wellness, arts and culture, environmental initiatives, animal welfare and more.

About Wisconsin Public Service Foundation

Wisconsin Public Service Foundation is funded by the shareholders of WEC Energy Group, not by the customers of its utility subsidiaries, and is in its 54th year. Since its inception, the Foundation has provided more than $33 million in contributions to programs that support work in the areas of arts and culture, community and neighborhood development, education, human services and health, and care for the environment. Learn more at www.wisconsinpublicservice.com/company/wpsfoundation.aspx.
WEC Energy Group (NYSE: WEC), based in Milwaukee, is one of the nation’s premier energy companies, serving 4.4 million customers in Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan and Minnesota. Visit wecenergygroup.com.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate and graduate programs to 7,158 students. The University transforms lives and communities through exceptional and award-winning teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities and a problem-solving approach to education. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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18-10

Engineering control panel

UW-Green Bay Mechanical Engineering Gets the Green Light

UW System Board of Regents Approves Critical Components of
University-Community Shared Vision for STEM

GREEN BAY – The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s efforts to establish an in-region resource for developing highly needed mechanical engineering talent in Northeast Wisconsin took a gigantic step forward today (Feb. 9, 2018) with the UW System Board of Regents approving the University’s request to offer the new program on its campus. UW-Green Bay hopes to begin accepting freshman into its Mechanical Engineering program for the Fall 2018 semester.

The approved resolution by the Board of Regents requires that the University have at least $1.2 million in cash donated to support the mechanical engineering degree before enrolling students and donation commitments between $800,000 and $1 million for each of the succeeding four years.

“This is a monumental day for our community and our region, one that’s been 30 years in the making,” said UW-Green Bay Chancellor Gary L. Miller. “Business leaders in this community have wanted engineering to be offered at UW-Green Bay for decades; we are now on the cusp of something very transformational for this community, our economy, and most importantly, our students, who are the workforce of the future.”

“We are deeply grateful for the leadership of President Cross and the extraordinary work of his staff, the care with which the Board nurtured the wishes of this community and to our legislative colleagues who encouraged us to seek innovation on behalf of Wisconsin.”

In addition to approving UW-Green Bay’s BS in Mechanical Engineering, Regents also approved establishing a School of Engineering on campus and granted the University permission to extend naming rights of the School to a non-disclosed community donor. The Board also approved the University’s request to rename the College of Science and Technology as the College of Science, Engineering and Technology to reflect the growing presence of engineering on the Green Bay campus.

According to Miller, the University has already secured donations totaling more than $7.1 million to support the University’s School of Engineering, the construction of the STEM building on campus and the updating of STEM curriculum for The Einstein Project’s outreach with school districts across the State of Wisconsin.

The building will be owned by Brown County as part of Phoenix Innovation Park, which will be located on the UW-Green Bay campus. In addition to UW-Green Bay’s School of Engineering, the building will also be home to UW Extension, Brown County Land & Water Conservation and The Einstein Project. Brown County and the State of Wisconsin are each contributing $5 million to the construction of the Center.

“Not only will this create a nexus for STEM-related issues, resource sharing and networking and bring a critical mass of STEM skilled professionals together, it will also create an accelerator for entrepreneurial skills to attract and keep STEM talent in Brown County. This is absolutely a game changer for our community,” Miller noted.

John Katers, dean of UW-Green Bay’s College of Science and Technology agreed. “The need for engineering talent in Northeast Wisconsin is extreme. This region has the most open positions for engineers in the State, and has seen an 18% increase in demand for engineers since 2010. As an aspiring engineer, I had to leave the Green Bay area to complete my engineering degree. Our future students won’t need to do that.”

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering will be UW-Green Bay’s first four-year engineering program and brings the total of engineering programs offered at the campus to four. Since 2014, the University has collaborated with NWTC to deliver Environmental, Electrical and Mechanical Technology programs.

The University is holding a news conference on Monday, February 12, 2018 at 10 a.m. in the Environmental Sciences building on the UW-Green Bay campus to announce naming gift donors and unveil building renderings.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate and graduate programs to 7,158 students. The University transforms lives and communities through exceptional and award-winning teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities and a problem-solving approach to education. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

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18-08

Electrical Engineering Tech students tour WPS

wpsElectrical Engineering Technology students led by Assistant Prof. M. Upal Mahfuz recently toured the Wisconsin Public Service (WPS) Corporation, a utility company in Green Bay, Wis. In Northeast and Central Wisconsin and Upper Michigan, more than 450,000 electricity customers and more than 326,000 natural gas customers receive service from the WPS. Mahfuz said the tour was a great opportunity for UW-Green Bay students to see practical SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems in operation. The students also experienced the functionality of SCADA systems in real time and the roles of SCADA engineers in power systems application.

Prof. Patricia Terry (and sister) says ‘thanks’ for hurricane relief

Eileen Terry, sister of Prof. Patricia Terry (Engineering, Natural and Applied Sciences), sends images of her first grade classes at Oleson Elementary School in Houston, Texas, to thank UW-Green Bay faculty and staff who contributed more than $1,400 to help students impacted by Hurricane Harvey. In addition to some new clothes, shoes and school supplies, each child got six new books to take home.