Faculty note: Shariff paper to be presented at World Bank Conference

UW-Green Bay Prof. Emeritus Ismail Shariff (Economics) has a new paper, “The Paradox of Rural Development in the Context  of New Innovations Facing the Agricultural Sector of Developing Countries,” that has been accepted for presentation at the World Bank Conference,  June 20-15, 2018.

Stoll and class helps community keep their eyes on ethics

Kevin B ethics1
Kevin Borseth

The Ethics in Business Awards were held Nov. 9 at the KI Convention Center, downtown Green Bay. With about 700 people in attendance, UW-Green Bay and specifically Public and Environmental Affairs (PEA, Economics) faculty and students were recognized for their work as part of the “research team,” of which Prof. John Stoll (PEA) coordinates. The research team devotes countless hours in reviewing nomination forms of about 100 nominees. The students prepared a report to the award selection committee, an independent group of community members that chooses the recipients. Alumnus Kaitlyn (Gilles) Lindner ’11 (Environmental Policy and Planning and Public Administration) headed the selection committee, and Green Bay Women’s Basketball Head Coach Kevin Borseth, was the featured speaker. Alumnus Tom Hinz ’03 (Interdisciplinary Studies) served as the Ethics in Business Selection Committee Chair. The annual luncheon honors ethical business practices in Northeast Wisconsin.

Stoll presents on economic evaluation of Cat Island Chain

UW-Green Bay Prof. John Stoll (Economics, Public and Environmental Affairs) gave a presentation entitled “CBA, Benefits Transfer, and the Cat Island Chain.” In the talk, he summarized work conducted with his former graduate student, Michael Hastreiter, performing an economic evaluation of the Cat Island Chain reconstruction in the Bay of Green Bay. The presentation was given in a tract consisting of talks focused upon water business. All of these presentations were part of a Water Research Conference titled “The Integration of Science and Economic Opportunity,” held at UW-Whitewater, Friday, Sept. 29.

UW-Green Bay Prof. Stoll interviewed on Fox 11

UW-Green Bay Prof. John Stoll (Public and Environmental Affairs, Economics) is collaborating with a team of researchers to gauge the economic impact of Wisconsin fisheries. “We want to get an idea how much fishing is happening here, how much is happening from outside the region with people coming here, or even from out of state, and how big of an impact does that create,” said Stoll, in an interview with Fox 11.

Faculty note: Huh published in leading journal

UW-Green Bay Assistant Professor Yunsun Huh (Democracy & Justice Studies, Dept. of Economics, Women’s and Gender Studies) has recently had a paper published in the top field journal, Feminist Economics. Her paper, “Gender Empowerment and Educational Attainment of U.S. Immigrants and Their Home Country Counterparts,” was first published online, and will later appear in the paper journal. The article specifically examines how immigrants to the United States from across 42 countries of origin are self-selected compared to their home country population, and analyzes the determinants of selectivity.

The full article is available for viewing online.

Faculty note: Nesslein chosen to participate in ‘Research on Poverty’


Economist Thomas Nesslein, associate professor of Urban and Regional Studies, has been chosen to participate in a four-day intensive workshop focused on the poverty theory and policy analysis, sponsored and paid for by the Institute for Research on Poverty at UW-Madison. The event takes place May 26-29. Key topics to be presented include A Historical Overview of Poverty and Poverty Policy, Conceptualizing Poverty, Measuring Poverty, The Causes of American Poverty, Possible Cures for Poverty, The Changing Labor Market and Rising Inequality, Impact of Selected Anti-Poverty Programs in the United States, Early Childhood Experience and Poverty, U.S. Health Policy and the Poor, and Rethinking Human Services.

Kangayappan, University Mace and scroll will feature prominently


The University Mace — a ceremonial staff signifying authority — will be carried to the stage Friday by the University’s most senior faculty member, Prof. Kumar Kangayappan, a faculty economist since 1968. As part of the ceremony, Kangayappan will remove from the Mace handle a scrolled parchment document signed previously by each of UW-Green Bay’s five chancellors, to which Gary L. Miller will add his own signature affirming the University’s purpose. The text of the proclamation:
The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is dedicated to the idea of an educated person as one who is guided by the love of learning, committed to inquiry, creativity and scholarship through interdisciplinary and disciplinary approaches to defining and solving problems, and who is an active citizen providing service to the community.

UW-Shariff: Family follows scholarly advice

top-story-shariffIf teaching at the same institution for 44 years isn’t enough to validate Prof. Ismail Shariff’s commitment to a University of Wisconsin-Green Bay education, consider that he also convinced his son, brother-in-law, and four grandchildren to attend UWGB before retiring in 2011.

The economist who continues to advise the World Bank, travels nationally to present on economic issues, and spends a day a week at the emeriti office on campus, said he found an environment of respectful collegiality along with deep meaning in the interdisciplinary, problem-focused academic program during his more than four decades with UW-Green Bay.

“My major professor at UW-Madison asked whether I was interested in a university job and set up an appointment to see (founding Chancellor) Dr. Edward Weidner. Apart from other things, Weidner explained to me the interdisciplinary curriculum he planned on adapting. I didn’t quite understand his philosophy, but he offered me the job and gave me seven days to reply. I came to benefit as a scholar and teacher, as did our students, from an interdisciplinary approach to problem solving.”

Shariff set out on what became his personal mission: “to prepare and equip future generations of citizens to meet challenges in society and the workplace and in a global context.”

“I believe these goals can be accomplished through a well-rounded educational career which provides breadth and depth of knowledge, insights, and understanding; along with the analytical skills and tools to deal with any exigencies one may encounter on the journey of life.”

Shariff believes UWGB provides this kind of education and through the years became a believer in “Weidner’s novel approach, since adopted by many other reputable institutions.”

“I came to enjoy the significance of the interdisciplinary curriculum, and the breadth of problem solving that came about from working with economists, geographers, political scientists, geologists, sociologists, demographers, statisticians, psychologists and others.”

He so fully appreciated the practical value of a UW-Green Bay education that he advised his children, grandchildren and brother-in-law that UW-Green Bay could provide an undergraduate experience “equal to Ivy League or any other bachelor program in the U.S.”

His family trusts in his wisdom. His son Mazkoor ‘89 graduated with a degree in Business Administration. His brother-in-law Javeed graduated in ‘80 with a degree in Environmental Sciences. His granddaughter Julia will graduate in May of 2015 with a Human Biology degree and honors, and aspiration to attend medical school. Of his three grandsons, Alexander will graduate in May 2015 with a major in Graphic Arts; Zachary is a junior majoring in Political Science and Jacob will enter UWGB as a sophomore in fall of 2015.

Shariff has more than 80 published papers in professional journals in the United States, U.K. and Asia. He is the author of two books, International Trade – Theory and Policy; and Business Cycles in a Dynamic Recovery. In his works and presentation in Italy in 2002, the editor and founder of the Schumpeter Lectures Series, V. Orati, wrote about the “brilliant and fearless” contribution of Dr. Shariff to the discussion about globalization.

Among his proudest moments were the peer-nominated Founders Awards for Excellence in Scholarship in 2002 and Community Outreach in 1997. An occasional e-mail from former students, and thank-you cards from recipients of the Ismail Shariff Endowed Scholarship he established in 2009 are greatly appreciated, he says.

“Something that is more rewarding than any other benefits one can draw, is contributing to the future well-being of our citizens,” he said. “I always hoped to keep their interest at heart.”

Among the honors for Shariff over the years:

• 1997 University Award for Excellence in Community Outreach. Notable were a weekly column in the Green Bay Press-Gazette, and involvement in the Chamber of Commerce, Junior Achievement and SIFE.

• Carrying the ceremonial University Mace at commencement and other academic occasions, an honor accorded the senior-most faculty member. Shariff carried it from 2005 to 2012.

• On March 24, 1994 his name was entered in the Congressional Record from the floor of the U.S. Congress in recognition of his extensive research on the relevance of American Aid to Developing Countries.

• In 1999, he was awarded a prestigious named professorship at UW-Green Bay and bestowed the title Philip J. and Elizabeth Hendrickson Professor for Business.

• In 1991, he was selected to represent the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades (GATT) meetings in Tokyo.

• In 1979, he was voted one of the “enterprising people” in Economic Education by the Wisconsin State Council on Economic Education.

• From 1975-77 he was a United Nations economic adviser to the government of Nigeria.

Photo caption:
From left: grandsons Zachary and Alexander, Ismail Shariff, grandson Jacob, granddaughter Julia and son Mazkor. Missing from the UWGB/Shariff family — brother-in-law Hajee Masood Javeed