Solar Eclipse at UW-Green Bay

Undaunted by a cloudy forecast, the UW-Green Bay community gathered outdoors to witness and celebrate the total solar eclipse (Wisconsinites in the Northeast saw about 80%). With safety in mind, faculty, staff, students and Phoenix family members shared eclipse safety glasses and homemade pinhole projector boxes to observe the solar phenomena. We even heard there were eclipse cookies given out. The weather held, with the sun peeking through the clouds for most of the afternoon. A couple of crafty employees made a Phoenix projection tool that reflected the eclipse in every hole. Groups gathered in the quad outside the University Union on the Student Services plaza, outside the Cofrin Library and outside of Laboratory Sciences.

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

2017 Solar Eclipse at UW-Green Bay

– Photos by Kimberly Vlies, Marketing and University Communication

Reminder: Campus eclipse viewing, about Noon to 2:30

A reminder: Adam Novotny, program coordinator for the Office of Student Life, encourages you to watch the eclipse the right way this afternoon. “There is a wrong and right way to watch the solar eclipse next Monday! Stop by the Office of Student Life (UU 150) as we have some eclipse glasses you can borrow to watch the rare sight!” Please be sure to return the glasses to Student Life when you are through.

Share your eclipse photos (but take them carefully)

Will you be viewing the eclipse on campus? Social media coordinator Jena Richter Landers invites you to share photos of your viewing and the effects of the eclipse on campus (crescent-shaped light across campus, group shots of spectators in eclipse glasses, etc.) Send photos to socialmedia@uwgb.edu or use #uwgbeclipse to share photos on Twitter and Instagram. To avoid eye and device damage, please educate yourself on proper viewing and recording of images. Do not view or photograph the eclipse without proper equipment!

80 percent coverage will still produce some ‘phenomenal phenomena’ UW-Green Bay’s Welsch says

Local residents may not get to see the sun’s corona, “Baily’s beads” or the “diamond ring” effect that occurs just before the moon completely blocks the sun, but UW-Green Bay Assistant Professor of Physics Brian Welsch said the 80 percent coverage will still produce some phenomenal phenomena. The Green Bay Press-Gazette spoke with Welsch last week at his eclipse presentation on campus.

Student Life’s Adam Novotny invites you to share eclipse glasses

Adam Novotny, program coordinator for the Office of Student Life, encourages you to watch the eclipse the right way on Monday. “There is a wrong and right way to watch the solar eclipse next Monday! Stop by the Office of Student Life (UU 150) as we have some eclipse glasses you can borrow to watch the rare sight!” Please be sure to return the glasses to Student Life when you are through.

University photographer Moore gives eclipse photography tips

“The excitement keeps on building for a rare solar eclipse now just five days away and while you may be tempted to take pictures you will want to make sure you have the right gear,” WBAY reports in an interview with campus photographer Dan Moore. In Wisconsin we will only see the partial eclipse so landscape photographer Dan Moore plans to travel some thousand miles away to Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. “I’ve done a lot of looking online, and looking for what the appropriate safety measures would be but also just what’s a proper exposure for a total eclipse,” said Moore.

Welsch, Moore receive local coverage on the solar eclipse

Brian Welsch Fox 11 interview UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Brian Welsch led “Oh, the Things You’ll See! A 30-minute Discussion of the Upcoming Eclipse,” Friday, Aug. 11 in the Christie Theatre. A total solar eclipse will be observable around midday Monday, August 21 along a path spanning the United States. While the path of totality will miss Wisconsin, the sun will be about 80% eclipsed around Green Bay. Welsch (Physics) discussed the crescent-shaped images of the partially eclipsed sun that will be visible in Northern Wisconsin, safe viewing practices and what those who travel to observe the total eclipse will see (This includes lots of traffic, so pack extra provisions!). Welsch and University photographer Dan Moore (also a National Parks photographer who will be recording the eclipse from the Grand Tetons) were interviewed by Fox 11.

See the interview

Reminder: Prof. Welsch to share eclipse expertise

Join UW-Green Bay faculty member Brian Welsch for “Oh, the Things You’ll See! A 30-minute Discussion of the Upcoming Eclipse,” from 12:30 to 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 11 in the Christie Theatre, University Union. On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be observable around midday along a path spanning the United States. While the path of totality will miss Wisconsin, the sun will be about 80% eclipsed around Green Bay. UW-Green Bay Assistant Prof. Brian Welsch (physics) will discuss the crescent-shaped images of the partially eclipsed sun that will be visible in Northern Wisconsin, safe viewing practices and what those who travel to observe the total eclipse will see. (This includes lots of traffic, so pack extra provisions!) If you can’t make the event at UW-Green Bay, another event will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13 at Neville Museum.