‘Voyageur’ accepting applications for spring 2020 interns

“Voyageur: Northeast Wisconsin’s Historical Review” is now accepting applications for editorial interns for the Spring 2020 semester. “Voyageur,” a nonprofit magazine dedicated to preserving the history of a 26-county area of greater Northeast Wisconsin, is published by the Brown County Historical Society in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Editorial interns will help prepare the magazine’s articles, photographs and image captions for publication. The position involves editing, writing and some research, as well as collaboration with the magazine’s graphic design students. The internship will be overseen by the magazine’s editors, Associate Prof. Eric J. Morgan (Democracy and Justice Studies) and Associate Prof. Daniel Kallgren (History).

If you have an interest in history or digital and public humanities, or a desire to work in writing or publishing, consider applying for this unique opportunity. The internship will count as three credits in Humanities, or with approval of the History chair, as an elective credit in History.

To apply, complete this very brief Qualtrics survey by Friday, Nov. 29th. If you have any questions about the internship, please contact Associate Prof. Morgan at morgane@uwgb.edu.

Humanities students looking for Green Bay Packers fans to interview

Calling fans of the green and gold! UW-Green Bay students are seeking Green Bay Packers fans to interview and record experiences about game memories, family traditions, tailgating, divided households and how they celebrate the Green Bay Packers in their daily lives. This semester, students in Digital and Public Humanities courses taught by UW-Green Bay Associate Prof. Heidi Sherman (History) and Brent Hensel, the curator for the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, are working on projects focused on the history of the Green Bay Packers. One of the projects involves sharing the stories of Green Bay Packers fans through oral history interviews. Deb Anderson, campus archivist, is working with the class to collect the stories and preserve them in the UW-Green Bay oral history collection.

“Books and films tell the story of the players, coaches, teams and games of the Green Bay Packers,” noted Anderson. “Little is written about the unique experience of being a super-fan, and we want to change that by capturing the voices of fans.”

Nominate a faculty/staff friend, or if you are willing to participate in the next few weeks in a brief interview of approximately 30 to 45 minutes, please contact Deb Anderson at andersod@uwgb.edu.

New podcast from ‘Humanities+’

Announcing a new episode of Humanities+: “The Student and Professor Voices on Humanities Research and Community-focused Work.In episode 3 of the Humanities+ podcast, host Rachel Scray interviews students, staff, and professors at the Pop-up Student Showcase event where students in Democracy and Justice Studies, History, and Humanities launched digital projects, curated exhibits, and research projects to stakeholders at UW-Green Bay and St. Norbert College. Throughout the day, Scray was able to live record a variety perspectives of the work and research that went into these projects over the semester, as well as their value to students, the University and the community. Take a listen!

Scholarship recipients from Humanities announced

UW-Green Bay Humanities announces its 2019 scholarship recipients, recognized at a Scholarship Awards Ceremony with Humanities faculty, Friday, May 10, 2019:

Alex Alberts (German and Accounting), received the Thomas E. Daniels Memorial Scholarship, available to students majoring in either English or Modern Languages.

Preston Fischer (English and History), was presented with a certificate of honorable mention.

Emily Gerlikovski (English and Communication), received the Lise Lotte Gammeltoft Scholarship, available to declared majors in the Humanities and associated disciplines.

Faith Klick (English and Theater), received the Coryl Crandall Memorial Scholarship, available to declared majors or minors in Humanities and its related disciplinary majors.

Eliot Klutz (Philosophy and English), received the Lise Lotte Gammeltoft Scholarship, available to declared majors in the Humanities and associated disciplines.

Coleton LaBarre (German, History, and the Humanities-Ancient/Medieval emphasis), received the Eugene Cruz-Uribe Annual Memorial Scholarship for Historical Studies, available to declared majors in History.

Emily Rotzenberg (History), received the Arnold Lelis Memorial Scholarship, available to students majoring in Humanities or History.

Rachel Scray (History and Humanities-Digital and Public), received the Harold and Edna Memorial Scholarship, available to declared majors or minors in Humanities and its related disciplinary majors.

“The Humanities faculty extend their sincere congratulations to these hard-working and most deserving students!”

Pop-up student showcase set for Monday, May 6

A Pop-Up Student Showcase featuring students from Democracy and Justice Studies, History, Humanities, Political Science and Public and Environmental Affairs will be taking place at the Weidner Center in Studio 301 on Monday, May 6, 2019 from 12:45 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. This celebration of student work will include demonstrations, launches, celebrations, presentations and live podcast recordings. Check out the full schedule.

History presentations a win for Packers/UW-Green Bay

History presentations a win for Packers/UW-Green Bay

This semester, UW-Green Bay History, Democracy and Justice Studies, and Humanities students and faculty, collaborated on an exciting project to document the history of the Green Bay Packers as the franchise celebrates 100 years. The students presented their findings at a public presentation at the Lambeau Field Atrium, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Student projects covered a wide terrain of Packers history. One project created by Grant Fischer, Kilian Carlson, Jamie Stankevitz, Rich Rehberg and Fisher Stathes, for example, explains how the Packers revolutionized professional football by deepening the use of the forward pass. Another, developed by Madeline Cichoki, Gwen Drumheller, Joseph Karrmann, Rachel Scray and Emily Bork, draw on the Lyle Lahey cartoon collection to show how the Packers were integral in how Green Bay residents understood national politics.

“I am very proud of our students who gave 10 articulately delivered presentations of their Green Bay Packers projects,” said Prof. Heidi Sherman. “Can you imagine being a first-semester freshman and having to present for 10 minutes at Lambeau field to 75 people and several local reporters and TV stations? Amazing!”

Click to advance slideshow or view the album on Flickr.

History - Digital Humanities Presentation at Lambeau Field

– Photos by Dan Moore, Marketing and University Communication

Are you ready for some Packers history?

Green Bay, Wis. — If you thought you knew everything there was to know about the green and gold, the work of some University of Wisconsin-Green Bay students may surprise you.

This semester, UW-Green Bay History, Democracy and Justice Studies, and Humanities students and faculty  collaborated on an exciting project to document the history of the Green Bay Packers as the franchise celebrates 100 years. Students will share their findings during a special open-to-the-public, free presentation on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Student projects cover a wide terrain of Packers history. One project created by Grant Fischer, Kilian Carlson, Jamie Stankevitz, Rich Rehberg and Fisher Stathes, for example, explains how the Packers revolutionized professional football by deepening the use of the forward pass. Another, developed by Madeline Cichoki, Gwen Drumheller, Joseph Karrmann, Rachel Scray and Emily Bork, draw on the Lyle Lahey cartoon collection to show how the Packers were integral in how Green Bay residents understood national politics.

“It was my hope that the students would learn about the early history of the Green Bay Packers, the beginnings under Curly Lambeau and some of the history not everyone is familiar with,” says Brett Hensel, curator and historian of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. “We also hoped that the students might discover some interesting new Packers history.”

Whether a tidbit or two informs a future project at the Hall of Fame remains to be seen, but Hensel said working with the UW-Green Bay students was a great experience.

“The Green Bay Packers history is such a beloved topic that it has been researched over and over again by many scholars,” he said. “So many different books done, especially depending upon the topic, and then with the organization approaching its 100th anniversary, there is even more research being done. Still, it’s difficult to find something original.”

Hensel co-taught Associate Prof. Heidi Sherman’s Introduction to Digital and Public Humanities and Associate Prof. Jon Shelton’s Craft of History course. Under the direction of Hensel, Sherman and Shelton, and using primary sources from archives (including UW-Green Bay’s award-winning Archives and Area Research Center), students from each class combined forces to develop a series of unique digital projects.

“I do believe partnerships and projects like these are very beneficial to both the University and the Green Bay Packers organization,” Hensel said. “We can learn a lot from each other, and the Packers organization prides itself in giving back to the community. I also believe that the projects are extremely value tool in learning for the students. Working in high level group projects is extremely important as they transition into the professional world.”

Members of the campus community and the public are invited to attend. Guests should enter through the Bellin Health Gate and will be directed by events staff to the presentation venue.

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Students can study Packers’ history for credit in fall 2018

How do you know you go to college in Green Bay? When your university offers classes on the Green Bay Packers’ history! In the fall 2018 semester, students can study the first 50 years of Packers organization, and get credit for it. Brent Hensel, the curator for the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, will be leading the courses in collaboration with UW-Green Bay professors Heidi Sherman and Jon Shelton. The classes are offered in the Digital and Public Humanities and History units. In the first part of the semester, students will study the history of the team from 1919-1969, and the second half of the semester will be a student research project. At semester’s end, students present their projects to a group at the historic Lambeau Field. WTMJ-TV has the full story.

UW-Green Bay students can earn credit in collaborative class with the Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are gearing up to celebrate “One Hundred Seasons” of history in 2019 and UW-Green Bay students have an exciting opportunity to participate and earn academic credit. In the fall 2018 semester, three classes (Hum Stud 200/300 and History 290) will team up under the leadership of Brent Hensel, the curator for the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, to study the first 50 years of Packers history (1919 – 1969).  In the semester’s first half, students will learn about the early history of football and Packers history in a lecture space with Hensel and receive a special tour of the Hall of Fame. For the remainder of the semester, students will research projects of their design on the Packers and their connection to the Green Bay community, which they will present to a group at Lambeau Field at the end of the semester.

These are gateway classes for the Digital and Public Humanities and the History majors. Students interested in either major are strongly encouraged to enroll in Hum Stud 200 or History 290.  Please contact the designated professor of the course of interest if you have any questions.

Prof. Heidi Sherman, shermanh@uwgb.edu, (Hum Stud 200: Introduction to Digital and Public Humanities; Hum Stud 300: Intermediate Digital and Public Humanities).

Prof. Jon Shelton (History 290: The Craft of History) sheltonj@uwgb.edu.

Classes meet concurrently.

UW-Green Bay receives rare ‘Viking House’

Reconstruction is scheduled for, Oct. 23-27

Green Bay, Wis. — UW-Green Bay is to become the new permanent home for a one-of-a-kind Norwegian Viking house. The house will have its grand opening Saturday, Oct. 28 from 3 to 5 p.m., with an official ribbon cutting at 3:30 p.m. Games, demonstrations, crafts and more will be available for all ages. Festivities will be adjacent to the Wood Hall parking lot, 2380 Wood Hall Drive, UW-Green Bay.

This unique replica is being donated by Owen and Elspeth Christianson, who have been studying Scandinavia’s Viking Age for more than 40 years. Owen Christianson is currently coordinating the reassembly of the house with UW-Green Bay’s Digital and Public Humanities students. The students are also preparing a catalog of the house to make available to anyone wishing to build their own.

The Christiansons will give a presentation about the house and their reasons for donating, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center. The event is sponsored by the

UW-Green Bay History Club and the campus community and public is welcome to attend.

The house, hand-built by the Christiansons, will provide hands-on learning experiences for members of the Green Bay community and beyond. UW-Green Bay aims to teach and engage in the day-to-day experiences of 11th century Viking life through explorations of crafts, customs and cuisine.

“The possibilities are endless,” Sherman says. “Students often describe themselves as hands-on learners and that they love acquiring applied skills in their college classes. Through Owen and Elspeth’s donation, we will be able to offer pre-industrial heritage skills to all students and community members who sign up for classes on campus.”

For more information regarding the grand opening, upcoming events, or Viking House details please email shermanh@uwgb.edu or visit www.facebook.com/UWGBVikingHouse. or http://www.uwgb.edu/viking-house/.

About the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a comprehensive public institution offering undergraduate and graduate programs to 7,158 students. The University transforms lives and communities through exceptional and award-winning teaching and research, innovative learning opportunities and a problem-solving approach to education. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu.

1759 ### (Press Release written by UW-Green Bay student Joshua Fields)