Human service professionals from across the state are receiving training in new ways from UW-Green Bay

Delivering training through synchronous (real time) sessions by distance is new for UW-Green Bay’s Behavioral Health Training Partnership (BHTP). BHTP is experienced in providing training via in-person and online course formats to human services professionals in 64 counties (and 1 tribe) across Wisconsin. In-person training has been built to use more interactive components (e.g., group activities), and may include expert speakers.

Given the current COVID-19 pandemic, a BHTP training that has recently moved to synchronous delivery using Blackboard Collaborate Ultra is Ethics and Boundaries: Stepping Forward When Colleagues Cross the Line, a four-hour session which was delivered for the first time on April 3, 2020 for approximately 45 participants from remote locations, primarily their homes. Another training, Crisis Services Overview, was delivered for the first time April 7-9 for 25 participants, who accessing the training primarily from their homes. The training, typically delivered as a six-hour one-day workshop, was changed to two-hour synchronous sessions over three days.

Jessica Delzer, Director of BHTP, initially expressed some concern about possible lower feelings of connectedness and interactivity by participants in planning for the new training format. These concerns turned out to be far from a barrier, but rather, became an opportunity to connect in a new way. Participants in the training appreciated the move to the new format, as well as BHTP’s ability to transition to a virtual format seamlessly and without interruption to their work schedule. Participants shared their feedback via course evaluations, and several reached out via email to the BHTP team after the session.  One participant wrote: 

I want to let you know how impressed we were with the training itself—presenter and topic—as well as how wonderfully the Blackboard program worked and how quickly you all pulled that together. It truly seemed to go off without a hitch, at least for us watching it on the large video screen, both in the big main group and the individual breakout sessions [in the distance course]!

Another participant commented that the training “worked beautifully and we were able to even do break-out sessions” via distance.

See a short video clip during one of the trainings.

Reminder: Retirement reception for Liz Hessler this Wednesday (Dec. 12)

After a 29-year career with the state and 19 years with UW-Green Bay, Liz Hessler will be retiring from her position in Behavioral Health Training Partnership (BHTP) at the start of the new year. BHTP invites you to join them as they celebrate Hessler’s career and wish her well in retirement. The reception will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018 in Rose Hall 315 from Noon to 2 p.m. Cake and refreshments will be served.

Reminder: Retirement reception for Liz Hessler, Dec. 12

After a 29-year career with the state and 19 years with UW-Green Bay, Liz Hessler will be retiring from her position in Behavioral Health Training Partnership (BHTP) at the start of the new year. BHTP invites you to join them as they celebrate Hessler’s career and wish her well in retirement. The reception will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018 in Rose Hall 315 from Noon to 2 p.m. Cake and refreshments will be served.

Crisis Grant Dementia Kickoff

UW-Green Bay Dementia advocates hope to train more trainers: have a ripple effect of dementia-friendly communities around the state

More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimers. Every 66 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops the disease. In 2016, Alzheimer’s and dementia will cost the nation $236 billion. UW-Green Bay is helping lead the way in dementia crisis care.

In November, champions of dementia care from nine Wisconsin counties and from a number of agencies met at UW-Green Bay in mid-November to begin training and support to counties and their providers in an effort to improve crisis interventions for persons with dementia. UW-Green Bay’s Behavioral Health Training Partnership www.uwgb.edu/bhtp/ is leading the effort with a grant from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services/Division of Care and Treatment Services. More than 50 county crisis workers, adult protective services workers, people who work in aging disability and resource centers, and family-managed care organizations, nursing home directors and activity coordinators, law enforcement and the Alzheimer’s Association were invited.

The first meeting was to identify task force members, trainers, and county champions to facilitate up to 10 trainings by June 30, 2017 around the state and continue to provide training to crisis responders after the grant expires. Secondly, the grant will help build a dementia-friendly community, using a toolkit designed to guide the process.

BHTP receives grant for closer look at dementia

The Behavioral Health Training Partnership (BHTP) at UWGB has received a $95,661 grant to improve understanding and crisis response to individuals living with dementia. The BHTP team, Sharon Locklin, Jessica Delzer and Gail Trimberger, will work with community partners over the next nine months to develop and implement regional trainings related to this important topic. The mission of the Behavioral Health Training Partnership is to collaboratively inform, encourage and assure regional best practices in behavioral health services. See the BHTP website for more.