Kriebel to receive sixth annual Earth Caretaker Award

The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) and the Alumni Association will jointly award the 2015 Earth Caretaker Award to 1977 UW-Green Bay graduate David Kriebel.

The award ceremony and reception will be held Monday, March 23, 2015 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the Phoenix Room of UWGB’s University Union.

Kriebel has been on the faculty of the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell since 1988, where he teaches introductory and advanced courses in epidemiology, risk assessment, and research synthesis.

As a researcher, Kriebel focuses on the epidemiology of occupational injuries, cancer, and non-malignant respiratory disease. He has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees on environmental health, along with writing and lecturing on the role of epidemiologic evidence in science policy decision making.

He also serves as the Director of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, which collaborates with industries, government agencies, unions, and community organizations on the redesign of systems of production to make them healthier and more environmentally sound.

Kriebel graduated summa cum laude from UW-Green Bay in 1977 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Biology. He completed a master’s degree in physiology and occupational health in 1983 and a doctorate in epidemiology in 1986 at the Harvard School of Public Health. Kriebel worked for famous environmentalist and author, Barry Commoner, for several years at Washington University in St. Louis.

Kriebel said he left his hometown of Philadelphia to study at UW-Green Bay because he was a “high school eco-freak, and determined to devote his life to improving the planet and reducing human suffering.” As a student, Kriebel was highly involved in the environmental movement helping to organize the Union of Young Environmentalists, a national student organization, as well as lobbying the state legislature for a special designation for UW-Green Bay as having an environmental mission.

Kriebel returned to UWGB to deliver the 2008 commencement address, in which he told graduates that “No matter what your career path, act as if you live on a small and very finite planet — think of her as you walk through life, choosing in 10,000 small ways the mark you will make and the legacy you will leave your children and their children.”

The Earth Caretaker Award honors UW-Green Bay graduates who have distinguished themselves in their professional field and are widely recognized for their career accomplishments in the areas of sustainability, environmental management, environmental policy, or other closely related areas.

#15-35

UW-Green Bay names alumnus Linzmeyer as Earth Caretaker Award winner

Paul Linzmeyer
Paul Linzmeyer
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay alumnus Paul Linzmeyer ‘78 recently was named the fifth recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on regional and international sustainability. He accepted the award Monday, April 21 during a joint Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) and Alumni Association reception held in UW-Green Bay University Union.

Linzmeyer is the Sustainability Leader at ThedaCare, which has five hospitals and 25 clinics, making it the largest employer in Northeastern Wisconsin. He is well known as an international strategist and speaker on business innovation and sustainability principles, and has more than three decades of experience as a business activist and proponent of “triple bottom line” thinking — an approach that incorporates the importance of sustainability into business practices.

Linzmeyer has served as a U.S. delegate to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OCED)’s Sustainable Manufacturing and Eco-Innovation Committee. He is past chair of the Wisconsin Workforce Investment Council, the Bay Area Workforce Development Board and the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce.

Since its inception in 2010, the Alumni Earth Caretaker Award has recognized a UW-Green Bay graduate who has gone on to make contributions to the environment and in his or her field of study. Award-winners are alumni who are highly regarded for their accomplishments in sustainability, environmental management, environmental policy or other closely related areas. Award recipients must hold an undergraduate or graduate degree from UW-Green Bay and have at least 10 years of experience beyond the University.

Past recipients of the Alumni Earth Caretaker Award are Ryan Stockwell (2013), Agriculture Program Manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Madison; Victoria Harris (2012), Water Quality and Habitat Specialist, UW Sea Grant (retired), Green Bay; Paul Wozniak (2011), environmental historian and educator, Chicago; and Paul Tower (2010), President and CEO of Applied Filter Technology, Snohomish, Wash. More information about the award and about EMBI are available online.

#14-86

Go Green: Linzmeyer receives UW-Green Bay’s Earth Caretaker Award

Earth Caretaker AwardUW-Green Bay’s Environmental Management Business Institute (EMBI) recognized UW-Green Bay alumnus Paul Linzmeyer ’78 April 21 as the fifth recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on regional and international sustainability. (See full press release online.)

Linzmeyer is the Sustainability Leader at ThedaCare, which has five hospitals and 25 clinics, making it the largest employer in Northeastern Wisconsin. He is an international strategist and speaker on business innovation and sustainability principles. Linzmeyer has served as a U.S. delegate to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OCED)’s Sustainable Manufacturing and Eco-Innovation Committee. He is past chair of the Wisconsin Workforce Investment Council, the Bay Area Workforce Development Board and the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce.

Linzmeyer accepted the award Monday (April 21) during a joint EMBI and Alumni Association reception held in the University Union.

Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view. Photos by Mike Arendt
UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014UW-Green Bay, Earth Caretaker Award reception, April 21, 2014

Reminder: Linzmeyer ’78 to earn alumni environmental award

UW-Green Bay alumnus Paul Linzmeyer ’78 will receive the University’s Earth Caretaker Award today (Monday, April 21) at a presentation ceremony at 6 p.m. in Phoenix A/B of the University Union. Linzmeyer is the Sustainability Leader at ThedaCare and a longtime corporate and private advocate for environmentally friendly solutions. EMBI and the Alumni Association are co-sponsoring the event. Details in our previous post.

Alumnus Linzmeyer is recipient of fifth Earth Caretaker Award

UW-Green Bay alumnus Paul Linzmeyer ’78 recently was named the fifth recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on regional and international sustainability. Linzmeyer is the Sustainability Leader at ThedaCare, which has five hospitals and 25 clinics, making it the largest employer in Northeastern Wisconsin. He is an international strategist and speaker on business innovation and sustainability principles. Linzmeyer has served as a U.S. delegate to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OCED)’s Sustainable Manufacturing and Eco-Innovation Committee. He is past chair of the Wisconsin Workforce Investment Council, the Bay Area Workforce Development Board and the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce. Linzmeyer will accept his award Monday (April 21) during a joint Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) and Alumni Association reception held in the University Union.
 

Wildlife Federation’s Stockwell selected for Earth Caretaker Award

Ryan Stockwell, Class of 2001, recently was named the recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on renewable energy opportunities and his promotion of using no-till farming techniques. He will accept the award Wednesday, April 24 during the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI)’s Green Innovations Symposium at UW-Green Bay. A Social Change and Development and History grad, Stockwell earned a master’s degree in history at Miami University and a Ph.D. in history at the University of Missouri. In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. Learn more.

EMBI award winner strives to make farming sustainable for generations

Ryan Stockwell featureRyan Stockwell desires to help create a sustainable agricultural system that farmers can be proud to pass on to future generations. Stockwell, a 2001 University of Wisconsin-Green Bay graduate will be presented with the Alumni Earth Caretaker Award, at the Green Innovations Symposium, April 22-24, for his work on renewable energy opportunities and practice using no-till farming techniques.

Ryan Stockwell
Ryan Stockwell

In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. He also provides strategic leadership in eliminating barriers to farmer adoption of cover crops.

For more than five years, Stockwell has worked on environmental issues in various capacities. Prior to his current position, he was a legislative assistant in the Missouri House of Representatives working on renewable energy legislation where he said he became “immediately hooked on addressing environmental problems through policy and education.”

Stockwell was also a community organizer in Montana and other western states for the Western Organization of Resource Councils where he worked to organize landowners and residents around climate change. And he worked as a program director for the Minnesota Project, a non-profit organization educating farmers, community leaders and policy makers about renewable energy opportunities through anaerobic digesters.

An interest in environmental issues started in history class at a young age for Stockwell.

“I still recall seeing for the first time pictures of frontier folk standing proudly in front of mountains of buffalo skulls,” Stockwell said. “I felt cultural shock when thinking how absolutely different such a spectacle would be viewed today.”

Cultural ideas from formative periods in American history are what Stockwell said have long-lasting political consequences.

Stockwell, who grew up on his parents’ farm, lives in Medford, Wis., where he, his wife Stephanie, and their three sons farm using no-till and cover crop practices.

“I use no-till and cover crops for many reasons,” Stockwell said. “First and foremost is my hope to pass on farming to my three sons.”

Using practices that preserve and naturally build the productivity of the land is important to Stockwell. By combining no-till and cover crops, Stockwell said nutrient pollution to waterways is reduced.

“Meanwhile, these practices improve farm profitability, and in many cases, increase yields,” Stockwell said. “It is the classic win-win opportunity.”

Stockwell will be a guest speaker at the Environmental Management and Business Institute’s (EMBI) Green Innovations Symposium (www.uwgb.edu/embi/symposium/), April 22-24 at UW-Green Bay. The symposium features topics on urban agriculture and community stability, with noted sustainability speaker David Orr, sharing his experiences with the “Oberlin Project” and a screening of Jeremy Seifert’s new film “GMO OMG.”  It will also include a panel discussion on genetically modified organisms and a focus on the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Project.

Stockwell majored in Social Change and Development and History at UW-Green Bay before earning a master’s degree in History at Miami University and a Ph.D. in History at the University of Missouri.

— Story by Michael Duenkel, editorial intern, Marketing and University Communication

UW-Green Bay names alumnus Stockwell as Earth Caretaker Award winner

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay alumnus Ryan Stockwell recently was named the recipient of the University’s Earth Caretaker Award for his work on renewable energy opportunities and his practice of using no-till farming techniques. He will accept the award Wednesday, April 24 during the Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI)’s Green Innovations Symposium at UW-Green Bay.

Ryan Stockwell
Ryan Stockwell
Stockwell, a 2001 UW-Green Bay graduate, majored in Social Change and Development and History. He earned a master’s degree in History at Miami University and a Ph.D. in History at the University of Missouri.

In his current position as agriculture program manager for the National Wildlife Federation, Stockwell conducts outreach on agriculture policy and performs policy analysis on agricultural legislation impacting wildlife and natural resources. He also provides strategic leadership in eliminating barriers to farmer adoption of cover crops.

For more than five years, Stockwell has worked on environmental issues in various capacities. Prior to his current position, he was a legislative assistant in the Missouri House of Representatives working on renewable energy legislation; and also served as a community organizer in Montana and other western states for the Western Organization of Resource Councils, working to organize landowners and residents around combating climate change. He also was a program director for the Minnesota Project, a nonprofit organization educating farmers, community leaders and policymakers about renewable energy opportunities through anaerobic digesters.

Stockwell, his wife Stephanie and their three sons live in Medford, where they farm using no-till and cover crop practices.

Stockwell will be a guest speaker at the EMBI conference that will be held April 22-24 at UW-Green Bay. The EMBI conference will include a panel discussion on genetically modified organisms, a focus on the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Project and a conference on food and local sustainability. For more information, visit www.uwgb.edu/embi.

#13-52