Tag: research

Hutchison caps ’21st Century City’ conference in Florence

top-story-italySociology Prof. Ray Hutchison of Urban and Regional Studies recently returned from Florence, Italy and the Everyday Life in the 21st Century City conference he organized for the Del Bianco Foundation.

Hutchison presented one of the three keynote talks, addressing the topic “When Austerity Came to the United States.” The other keynotes were by Derek Hyra, director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University, and Circe Monteiro, chair of Architecture and Planning at the Federal University Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil.

The three-day conference included some 45 speakers from more than a dozen countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, England, Israel, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Taiwan and the United States.  Sessions were organized around the themes of The Right to the City, The Well-Being Challenge, Neoliberal Urban Policy, Suburbanization and New Communities, and Urban Night Life.  Speakers included four persons who had presented papers at the first Everyday Life conference (Everyday Life in the Segmented City) in 2010.  Hutchison is currently working with the Del Bianco Foundation to plan a conference in June 2016 on the topic of Immigration: Crisis, Policies, and Remedies.

The snapshots here show 1) Participants en route to Capella Medici (the conference provided passes to Florence museums); 2) a tour of the Palazzo Coppini and the offices of Del Bianco Foundation; 3) Simone Giometti, secretary general of the Foundation, introducing one of the sessions; 4) Corinna Del Bianco at the opening plenary session, with Hutchison and Hyra at the table; and 5) Hutchison making a point.

(Click thumbnails to enter slideshow view.)
 Conference: Everyday Life in the 21st Century City, July 17-20, 2015, Florence, Italy Conference: Everyday Life in the 21st Century City, July 17-20, 2015, Florence, Italy Conference: Everyday Life in the 21st Century City, July 17-20, 2015, Florence, Italy Conference: Everyday Life in the 21st Century City, July 17-20, 2015, Florence, Italy Conference: Everyday Life in the 21st Century City, July 17-20, 2015, Florence, Italy
Photos submitted by Ray Hutchison

Faculty note: Warner publication

Associate Prof. Lora Warner of Public and Environmental Affairs is the author of the article “Catalytic Funding, Partnership, Evaluation, and Advocacy: Innovation Strategies for Community Impact,” published in The Foundation Review: Vol. 7: Iss. 2, (Article 8). You can read a summary at the journal archive.


Undergraduate researchers honored and recognized

research-top-storyThe experience is worth celebrating, but so is the recognition.

A number of UW-Green Bay undergraduates had a fantastic opportunity to participate in graduate-level research this year and were honored among the winners of the outstanding presentation awards at the 14th Annual UW-System Symposium for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity.

Their research and presentation was one of 16 finalists selected from among 400 presentations representing undergraduate research from across the UW System.

Their presentation — “Phoenix GPS: A Wholistic College Transition Approach for Underrepresented Students” — reports on the year-one results of an intensive, year-long enrichment program for first year students at UW-Green Bay. Team members were Hannah Blum, Ashley Grant, Jordan Grapentine, Sarah Londo and Alex Wilson. Serving as their mentor was Denise Bartell, UWGB professor of Human Development.

“These students are a shining example of the value of undergraduate research experience for students from all majors,” said Bartell. “Despite coming into the project with very different levels of prior research experience, all developed graduate-level research and group work skills, had the opportunity to present at a national professional conference, and are currently working with me on a manuscript for publication of this data.”

Like her fellow student researchers, Alex Wilson served as a peer mentor in the program. She said the new challenge helped her to grow in ways unexpected: “I came to the realization that the project had a positive effect on my attitude and academics, and that I now place a greater perspective on empathy.”

“I wasn’t sure what to expect, but after the first semester, I found that I was providing to students what I haven’t always had in my life,” she said. “As a low income, first-generation college student, I understand that there are different barriers for every student. Providing opportunities for first-year students to succeed, despite the barriers, became something that I believe in. The types of experiences that the GPS students are having during their first year acts as an equalizer. Our data shows that many of the opportunities that we provide, such as tutoring, relationship building and service learning will create a learning environment that a student is more likely to want to stay in.”

The Gateways to Phirst Year Success (GPS) program provides historically underrepresented students with an engaging learning community experience, a network of mentors, and opportunities to develop academic agency and connections to campus and community.

GPS students earned significantly higher GPA’s, engaged in high impact experiences at higher rates, and were retained at significantly higher rates than similarly situated students who did not participate in GPS, and these results were strongest for students of color.

Underrepresented students who participate in GPS are 17.6% more likely to be retained at UWGB into year two (92.2% vs. 74.6%) and 13.1% more likely to be retained through the end of the second year (81.3% vs. 68.2%), as compared to underrepresented students who don’t participate in GPS.

Underrepresented (UR) GPS students earn significantly higher GPA’s than other underrepresented students in the first year (3.07 vs. 2.74), are significantly more likely to have declared a major (60.9% vs. 49.0%), and report participating in almost twice the number of high impact experiences during their first year (5.4 vs. 3.0). They are also significantly more likely to utilize campus resources in their first year when they need help, and participate in significantly more co-curricular activities, as compared to other UR students.

The GPS program also eliminates the equity gap for UR students in UWGB’s Human Biology 102 course — GPS students performed as well as represented students in this course.

Researching and quantifying the data was only one step in the process for the student researchers. Presenting their data to larger audiences presented a learning curve as well.

“The first few times we presented, we relied heavily on our peer mentor to paint a picture, but we’ve all gotten really comfortable with the numbers and data collection,” Wilson said. “The statistics demonstrate the successes that we saw during the time spent with students.”

Wilson also found that the lessons she learned translated well to outside the project… even outside the University.

“I talk about this program quite a bit,” she said. “The challenges I experienced as a peer mentor come up regularly in my work environment and I have a better idea how to manage. The knowledge I’ve gained as a research assistant is incredibly valuable. It was unexpected, but the growth I’ve witnessed through involvement has been obvious and important in my everyday life.”

Bartell said the program speaks volumes about the power of students’ commitment to helping others maximize their success in college.

“This group of research students represent a diverse set of majors, from Human Development to Spanish to Human Biology,” says Bartell. “They all chose to participate in the research project in order to continue their service to the University and to the underrepresented first-year students who are served by the GPS Program.”
(Pictured in the photo at the top: From left to right, Jordan Grapentine, Ashley Grant, Hannah Blum, Prof. Denise Bartell, Alex Wilson and Sarah Londo at the National Resource Center’s First-Year Experience Conference in Dallas, February 2015)

Profs. Currier and Luczaj and students take research on the road

UWGB Professors Ryan Currier and John Luczaj of Natural and Applied Sciences along with 12 students attended the North Central Section of the Geological Society of America meeting in Madison at the end of May. Summaries of the presentations are linked, below. Three of the students presented posters related to their own classwork with Prof. Currier:

Undergraduate Student (Geoscience Major) Zach Ashauer: “The Lashly Mountains of Southern Victorialand, Antarctica: Investigating a Possible Ancient Volcano.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255474.html (independent research).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Sarah Faga: “Using GIS to Uncover the Link Between Radon Potential and Geology in Wisconsin.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper256015.html (master’s thesis).

Graduate Student (ES&P Program) Brian Yagle: “Experiments on the Evolution of Laccolith Morphology: The Maturation from Elliptical to Circular Shaped Intrusions.”
https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2015NC/webprogram/Paper255751.html (Capstone in Environmental Science Course). Most of the data for the poster were collected by students as part of a student-based research project in the class. Coauthors were Dr. Patrick Forsythe (the lead instructor for the course) and Yagle.

In addition, Prof. Luczaj, who serves as UWGB’s Geoscience Chair, gave an oral presentation, “Modern Aquifer Chemistry as a Function of Water-Rock Interaction: A Case Example from Eastern Wisconsin.”

Lones, Blake pursue competitive summer research opportunities

lorenzo-top-storyWhile some students will spend summer in relaxation mode, UW-Green Bay’s Lorenzo Lones will be working in a lab at one of the top research programs in the nation.

Likewise, UW-Green Bay junior Tresavoya Blake, a History and Democracy and Justice Studies major, will be interning at Loyola University Chicago in its Multicultural Affairs Division this summer as part of a National Undergraduate Fellowship Program.

Each are mentored and encouraged by Justin Mallett, the director of UWGB’s American Intercultural Center.

Lones, a double major in Psychology and Human Biology, will be participating in the University of Iowa Summer Research Opportunity Program throughout June and July. The eight-week program is designed to prepare participants for future doctoral studies through involvement in research and other scholarly activities.

While at the University of Iowa, Lones will be working with Dr. Andrew Pieper, MD, Ph.D. and Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Radiation Oncology.

“One of the things that interested me is that the professor I will be working has a very diverse lab team,” said Lones, “He has women, Latinos, African-Americans, so it is just a very diverse team. Also, his research is closely aligned with the type of research I want to do in my career.”

Lones will be working with Pieper to study the effects of two chemicals on mice: One that helps create new brain cells in the memory center of the brain and one that helps stop cell death.

“We have a lot of psychiatric medication that deals with symptoms, but his lab is actually looking at what is causing the symptoms and trying to change the course of the disorder in the brain instead of just alleviating symptoms,” Lones said.

This experience will be a first for Lones who says he has never worked directly in a lab such as this before.

“This will be the first time I’m in the lab actually manipulating things,” he said, “As far as animals are concerned too, I’ll be working with the rats. So that will be a pretty nifty hands-on experience for me.”

Entering UWGB, he thought he would someday be a school psychologist. “I took Prof. Dennis Lorenz’s physiological psychology class and started studying the nervous system and then realized I really like understanding how the brain works.”

He followed that with a molecular biology course with Prof. Uwe Pott, and is honing his career path to research.

“What I want to study is not necessarily the act of giving treatment, but looking at what is the course of treatment… instead of of being a doctor, doing medical research that doctors can benefit from.”

Blake-storyFor Tresavoya Blake, the fellowship is an extension of involvement at UW-Green Bay. She laughs as she begins her list… “Women of Color, Black Student Union, the Diversity Taskforce…”

Her involvement provided a strong case for acceptance into the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program through the National Association for Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), and the benefits associated with it — such as the eight-week fellowship at Loyola.

“I’ll be actually working with the different staff in different departments, working on any projects they might want me to do,” she said, “Basically learning more about the student affairs field and narrowing down which department or division of student affairs I would be most interested in pursuing when I go to graduate school and eventually start my own career in student affairs.”

Both Lones and Blakes said they understand the need for mentoring and appreciate the faculty and staff who support and encourage them.

“After my experiences here at Green Bay, especially in the American Intercultural Center, and seeing how they helped me just stay here and become more comfortable in the university, that’s the kind of impact I want to make on students in general,” Blake said. “In my future, I want to be the person that helps students of color, underrepresented students, and students in general, navigate through college.”

Lones said he is grateful to the faculty and staff that have helped him prepare for this opportunity, including Prof. Kris Vespia, who worked with him over winter break to help prepare his personal statement.

“The multicultural advisors, Crystal, Justin, and Mai, they do a really good job at keeping me on a straight path,” he said, “The faculty here at the school have been tremendous. They’ve been extremely supportive. I don’t know where I’d be without them.”

Story by Katelyn Staaben, editorial intern

Healing habitats: Grant to build comprehensive plan for fish, wildlife

wolf-howe-top-storyMore than a dozen undergraduate and graduate students have a tremendous opportunity to work alongside UW-Green Bay Professors Bob Howe and Amy Wolf on a comprehensive plan to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the region.

Howe, Wolf and UWGB staff, in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC), are the recipients of a $471,000 Environmental Protection Agency/Department of Natural Resources grant to study fish and wildlife conditions and threats in what is termed the “Lower Green Bay and Fox River Area of Concern” and its immediately contributing watershed.

“This project is important for our region because it will yield one of the most, if not the most, specific plans for improving fish and wildlife habitat in the lower Bay and Fox River,” said Howe.

Howe considers the assessment, and the recommendations vital to the future regional economy and quality of life.

“Although the AOC is clearly degraded, more and more evidence has shown that this is a ‘world class’ site for freshwater fish, colonial and migratory birds, and other wildlife species,” said Howe. “I view Green Bay as comparable to Chesapeake Bay on the East Coast and San Francisco Bay on the West Coast — places where natural resources have experienced degradation, but places where these resources are still very much alive and are vital to the future local economy and quality of life,” he said.

Lower Green Bay and the Fox River below the DePere Dam comprise one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC’s) designated in 1987 by the International Joint Commission of Canada and the United States through the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The ultimate goal of the UWGB/TNC project is to help develop a strategy for improving conditions in the AOC so that it can be removed or “de-listed” from its impaired status.

Loss of fish and wildlife habitat is one of the most significant reasons why the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC was designated as an AOC. Documented (WDNR) causes of ecological and economic impairment of the Lower Green Bay and Fox River AOC include:
• habitat destruction and fragmentation due to urban and industrial development and stream channelization;
• dredging and filling of aquatic habitats along the Fox River corridor;
• wetland degradation from human activity and changing water levels;
• disruption of hydrologic connectivity by road construction and other human activities;
• loss of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Duck Creek delta area of the lower Bay because of turbid water and hyper eutrophication;
• destruction of barrier islands in the Cat Island Chain by high water and storms;
• reduction in underwater plants and littoral vegetation by invasive carp;
• silt deposition and re-suspension of sediments in the Lower Bay; and
spread of invasive plant species.

Alongside UWGB staff members Erin Giese, Michael Stiefvater, Kimberlee McKeefry, and Bobbie Webster, Howe and Wolf are working with students on this two-year, two-phase project to comprehensively assess existing habitat conditions and formulate a protection and restoration plan in the affected areas.

In each phase, UW-Green Bay students will be able to assist the faculty and staff members and Wisconsin DNR and TNC collaborators in their comprehensive research and development of the plan.

Phase One, the assessment portion of the project, will focus primarily on finding, organizing and evaluating existing data related to fish and wildlife populations in the AOC. Information will be compiled from a wide variety of sources, including local experts, on historical conditions, habitat dynamics, restoration opportunities and threats in the lower Bay and Fox River.

Phase Two goals include synthesis of the information, creating a blueprint for protection and restoration activities; identifying specific opportunities for protection, restoration and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife habitat; cataloging past projects to assess their contribution towards delisting thresholds and developing monitoring protocols for measuring the status of fish and wildlife habitat to document the success or failure of specific remediation projects.

Proposers say the project will “test the utility of objective metrics for the ultimate purpose of informing decision-makers at local, regional and national levels, particularly those making decisions involving the status, protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in other Great Lakes Areas of Concern.”

Work began in fall of 2014 and will continue through August of 2016. This project is particularly significant because it adds to a long-standing and growing involvement of UW-Green Bay scientists and students in solving problems of water quality, ecological health, and economic viability of Green Bay and the Great Lakes in general. Other recent grants by UWGB Natural and Applied Sciences professors Kevin Fermanich, Mike Zorn, Matt Dornbush, Patrick Forsythe and others, demonstrates the important role of UWGB in helping improve environmental quality in the Green Bay ecosystem.

Feature story: Grad students host visit by US Fish and Wildlife Service VIP

Two graduate fisheries researchers (Rachel Van Dam and Angelena Koosmann) are featured on the regional website of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Deputy Regional Director for the Midwest Charlie Wooley visited the Green Bay area to check out the combined impact of federal, state and local restoration efforts in the Green Bay watershed. He spent time with Van Dam on the west shore checking restored northern pike spawning wetlands, and helped Koosmann evaluate and release two large muskies (and other fish) at Wequiock Creek not far from campus. Read more.

Rosewall returns from Pacific Northwest, continues case-studies tour

Prof. Ellen Rosewall of Arts Management has just returned from the Pacific Northwest, where she presented a session on “The Future of Arts Management Education” to the Association of Arts Administration Educators conference in Portland. She also spent three days teaching and conducting faculty development workshops at the University of Oregon in Eugene, and was honored at an author reception and book signing at Seattle University. As a part of her sabbatical research project, she met with arts organizations and administrators in Portland, Eugene and Seattle who are engaged in innovation and change, including the Pacific Northwest College of Art, Oregon Ballet Theater, ADX Portland, the Hult Center for the Performing Arts (Eugene), the Gallery at the Watershed, and the Frye Museum of Art in Seattle.

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Profiling the innovative arts organization – Prof. Ellen Rosewall visited several dozen arts organization across the country this semester. Rosewall says that, following publication of her book Arts Management in 2013, her next project will be to present case studies of organizations coping with the changing arts landscape of the 21st century.

List of student exhibitors at Academic Excellence Symposium 2015

The 14th annual Academic Excellence Symposium, showcasing the talent and research ability of some of UW-Green Bay best students, took place April 7. The list of Academic Excellence Symposium projects, students, faculty advisers:

Reaching Out Through Girl Scouts 

Brittany Pyatt
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

Western Policy and Influences on Middle Eastern Terrorism: Al-Qaeda
Alexander Girard
Eric Morgan, Democracy and Justice Studies

Funding the Southern Door County School District: A Policy Analysis 

Jared Spude
David Helpap, Public and Environmental Affairs

Assessing the Effects of Media Exposure
Shelby Vanhouten, Meghan Baker, Kayla Blochowiak, Sarah Wick
Regan AR Gurung, Human Development

Freedom House: Early Childhood 

Morgan Bolli
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

A Policy Analysis: Phosphorus Loading 
the Bay of Green Bay
Gina Vlach
David Helpap, Public and Environmental Affairs

Maternal Education and SES Effects on Creativity During Joint Engagement Reading
Cassandra Bartlett
Sawa Senzaki, Human Development

London Post-War Housing and the 
Festival of Britain
Joseph Taylor, Benjamin Dudzik, Hannah Giesick
Caroline Boswell and Heidi Sherman, Humanistic Studies

In-home Therapy with Children on the Autism Spectrum 

Kelly Berth
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

The Lost Connection: Benefits of Being a Bilingual Professional in the U.S. Healthcare System
Julia Rose Shariff
Cristina Oritz, Humanistic Studies

Efforts Directed Toward the Synthesis of Obolactone
Lauren Anderson, Noel Craig, Kristin Short
Julie Wondergem, Natural and Applied Sciences

Improving Engagement within the Psychology and Human Development Majors
Kortney Krajewski, Kathryn Doll, Michelle McChesney, Chad Osteen, Amanda Schartner
Jenell Holstead, Human Development

Attitudes and Perceptions of Mental Illness
Olyvia Kuchta
Ryan Martin, Human Development

Positive Body Image Program Analysis
Mackenzie Wink, Haily Hummelmeier
Kristin Vespia, Human Development

15 Locus of Control and the Stress Response
Sarah Londo
Ryan Martin, Human Development, Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Effects of Coping Style and Age on Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention Behaviors
Hollis Reynolds
Dean VonDras, Human Development

A Meta-analysis of Mindfulness Training as a Therapeutic Intervention for Externalizing Disorders
Destany Calma-Birling, Emily DiNatale
Dean VonDras, Human Development

On Broadway District Neighborhood Master Plan
Rebecca Ellenbecker, Sadie DiNatale
Marcelo Cruz, Urban and Regional Studies Ashley Heath, Center for Public Affairs

Children’s Edible Garden Intern with the Brown County Central Library
Sarah Tomasiewicz
Sara Schmitz, Human Biology

Meme Impressions
Chad Osteen
Kathleen Burns, Human Development

Science of Sexy? An Empirical Test of 
Dressing Recommendations
Sarah Wick, Meghan Baker, Kayla Blochowiak, Shelby VanHouten
Regan AR Gurung, Human Development

Emotions in Sports Performance 

Kayla Hucke
Ryan Martin, Human Development

Impact of Phonology and Number on Children’s Novel Plural Productions 

Katharine Bright, Kayla Hucke
Jennifer Lanter, Human Development

Exploring the Significance of Faults and Fractures in the Confined Aquifer in Northeastern Wisconsin (Brown and Outagamie Counties): Insights From Stable Isotope Patterns 

Amanda Hamby
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences

Comparison of Analytical Methods for 
the Determination of Chlorophyll a 

Ryan Badeau
Michael Zorn, Natural and Applied Sciences

Extracurricular Group Impact 

Kathryn Doll
Jenell Holstead, Human Development

The Physiologic Effects of Video and Audio Stimuli on the Human Body

Ryan Hass, Travis Ladwig, Mary Pappas, Kaitlyn Pilarzyk, Crystal Remsza, Aimee Schaefer, Bridget Schedler
Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Impact of Music Tempo on Perceived Exertion During Exercise
Katrina Schumann, Alisha Maciejewski, Hailey Mohrfeld
James Marker and Craig Hanke, Human Biology

Decisions and Personality: Self-Regulation and the Big Five
Kari Kovacs
Kathleen Burns, Human Development

Perceptions of Abuse
Monica Wysocki
Kathleen Burns, Human Development
Emergence of Cross Cultural Difference in Moral Development in Infants
Keegan Eggert
Sawa Senzaki, Human Development

Revealing Green Bay: Industry and Development in Print
Gena Selby
Chris Style, Art and Design

Vocalissimo: Creative Activities in Florence, Italy with a Musical Performance
Ashley Gutting, Evan Ash, Tori Schuurmans
Sarah Meredith-Livingston, Courtney Sherman. Music

Drawdown of the Potentiometric Surface in the Cambrian-Ordovician Aquifer in Marinette County, Wisconsin
Christa Kananen
John Luczaj, Natural and Applied Sciences

Senior Show Portrait Paintings
Laura Schley
Kristy Deetz, Art and Design

High schools to share research at Tuesday’s watershed symposium

Nearly 100 students and teachers from participating Northeastern Wisconsin high schools will spend the day on the UW-Green Bay campus Tuesday (April 14) for the 12th annual Student Watershed Symposium. The symposium brings together the high schoolers and UW-Green Bay faculty researchers who partner on monitoring the health of the Fox River basin through the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program. The day’s activities run from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with the morning presentations in the Phoenix Rooms of the University Union free and open to the public. In the afternoon, participating students will have the opportunity to tour the Richter Museum and Fewless Herbarium, take part in a frog-monitoring workshop, and compete in a quiz bowl.

Among the featured high school presentations:
Duck Creek Team: Website — Students from Green Bay Southwest H.S. have created a website for their science club that showcases their involvement with LFRWMP.
Trout Creek Team: Public Awareness — Students from Pulaski H.S. have created videos promoting public awareness on issues such as nutrient pollution, dead zones, PCB cleanup and northern pike restoration.
Spring Brook Team: Nitrates by the Stream — Students from Oshkosh North H.S. have investigated the cause of high nitrate levels in “their” stream, and contacted landowners near the brook to identify potential sources.
Ashwaubenon Creek: Frogs, Their Importance and Why We Monitor — An introduction to frogs and their importance to watershed ecosystems by Green Bay East H.S. student Jermaine Toliver-Marx.

For more, see the full news release.